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Old 01-25-2013, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,947 posts, read 8,938,566 times
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Default Has New Orleans fully recovered from Katrina?

I don't live in New Orleans but visited in 2003 before Katrina. I really liked the unique vibe of it and the fact there is pretty much no other city in the US like it. I was saddened at the devastation caused by Katrina and the subsequent population loss. In 2009, I remember hearing quite a large portion of the city was still dilapidated from the hurricane. We are now in 2013...is New Orleans recovered? Is there still rough edges compared to pre-Katrina i.e. 9th ward? What about population wise? Is the city growing again? How would you compare 2013 New Orleans to 2005 New Orleans before the hurricane?
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:58 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
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It's a good question and one that has been debated often locally.

In some sense, yes, we have recovered- though still down from our peak population, the metro is growing quickly and has become a hotbed of entrepreneurism. We also set a tourism record last year.

However, for many of us natives, there still lingers a certain sadness- a sense that many people do not understand what we lost in the storm. How we had to convert our famous joie de vivre into an irrepressible sense that we would come back, and be better than ever. Even in politics, this can be seen- prior to the storm most locals put up with corruption because it was just seen as part of the charm of living here. In short, Katrina really made us put on our "serious faces".
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Old 01-26-2013, 05:31 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
108 posts, read 79,094 times
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Depends on what you mean by recovered. Housing prices (including renting) are twice the amount they used to be, without insurance. Insurance has sky rocketed. The price of food as gone up. Jobs are hard to find and pay little. The major groups for hotels (conventions) have mostly stopped booking their groups.

On the plus side, the musicians are starting to come back. Most of the physical damage has been fixed. Tourism has gotten much better but its still not what it was before Katrina.

Honestly, the city doesn't feel the same anymore. There used to be an intense magic to this city. The feeling is gone.
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Old 01-26-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: In the city
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I don't necessarily think "the magic is gone" but the city has been through a trauma. It will have lingering effects as long as the people who experienced it are alive and living here. Trauma changes the landscape, no matter where it happens.

To a visitor, I really doubt that you would notice an appreciable difference. You will probably spend a lot of time in the French Quarter which was very little affected by Katrina. The city is growing, though not at the level it was pre-storm. Isaac didn't do us any favors-- the damage to the city was minimal, but most people don't know enough about the LA landscape to understand that the places that really got hit were outside the city. I have relatives that still ask if I had flooding.

There are still rough edges; the city has always been a mix of the genteel and the gritty. I am seeing gentrification trickle in slowly but steadily to different neighborhoods as young professional transplants move here. I have heard complaints about jobs being hard to find with low pay: I work for the government and have not experienced the private sector job market. A friend who moved here last year had a $17/hr temp job that hired permanently at $20/hr within a few days of coming here, so I think it may depend on where you are looking, your resume, and how you network. That isn't a ton of money, but it was enough to get set up in a decent place. Service industry jobs seem plentiful but difficult to make a living wage doing. I know several people who work in hospitality and need two or more jobs to make ends meet.

It makes me sad when I hear people saying they think "the magic is gone!" I do think that the city is still mourning in some ways. But if we all focus on what is lost, the city will never regenerate. Its a difficult line to walk. New Orleanians are a tough and determined lot. They are NEVER going to give up on their home.
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:15 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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How are the current condition of the levees and what kind of infrastructure has been or will be constructed to prevent that kind of devastation on that kind of scale?
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Old 01-27-2013, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
How are the current condition of the levees and what kind of infrastructure has been or will be constructed to prevent that kind of devastation on that kind of scale?
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New Orleans District

The city is better now. I was younger when I would go to the city pre-storm but none of the growth and investment would have occurred otherwise.
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Old 01-27-2013, 06:31 PM
 
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I don't know how far along New Orleans is. To be quite honest, I never paid alot of attention to New Orleans until Hurricane Katrina hit. My concern was for my relatives. I have relatives there. From what I was told, New Orleans had issues with a corrupt police force. I had been to New Orleans long before Katrina hit.

I think for me, there was a certain kind of malaise that hit me after the hurricane hit. I haven't seen New Orleans since 1998. I expected the flooding and destroyed buildings. However, the magnitude of that destruction shocked me. The debacle with all levels of government from top to bottom put me in a malaise. It was like a sense of shock for me. My relatives survived the hurricane. However, watch the mess in the government, from the top to the bottom made me question alot of things. Seeing people in such desperate conditions that just blew my mind.

I think the hurricane exposed a side of New Orleans I had never seen before. I never knew how much corruption there was until after. I never new that New Orleans had such a high murder rate. I knew New Orleans had a high poverty rate, but I never knew what went on in New Orleans until after. I always envisioned New Orleans as being the big party city where Mardi Gras occurs, and where you have jazz bands and a strong French heritage.

I think the question for me is this. How is the city today?
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Mid-City, New Orleans, LA
805 posts, read 774,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
How are the current condition of the levees and what kind of infrastructure has been or will be constructed to prevent that kind of devastation on that kind of scale?
The hurricane protection system has been drastically improved from its condition when Katrina hit. All the outfall canals have floodgate protection at Lake Ponchatrain to prevent storm surge from entering the relatively delicate canals. There is also the new mile long 26ft high Lake Borgne surge barrier that will prevent storm surge from entering the industrial canal. The canals are what breached during Katrina and these new barriers prevent that.

If Katrina were to hit again, there would still be wind damage, but ZERO flooding. The city was given a good test during Hurricane Issac last year. The storm surge from Issac was ~13.5ft compared to Katrina's ~15.5ft. Everyone inside the levee system was well protected. Those on the outside, that was a different story.

Last edited by rburnett; 01-28-2013 at 07:44 AM..
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:15 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
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I'm not so sure about zero flooding. We still get flash floods.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Port St Lucie Florida
1,170 posts, read 1,091,232 times
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Whoa !! The 17th street canal pumping station is still the temporary station that was to last 3 years. Katrina was 2005!!!! Hummmm.

Corps of Engineers awards $630 million contract for permanent pump stations at outfall canals | NOLA.com

Levees.Org

Why do people trust government, seems like after Katrina no one should trust government, then again there is Hurricane Sandy as a good example inaction by the government.

Hurricane Sandy: New Jersey Rebuilding Ahead Of Thoughtful Decisions?
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