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Old 06-11-2010, 08:06 AM
 
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I was at the Time Warner Center the other night for Jazz at Lincoln Center. I thought I was in Las Vegas, with the piped in music and general cold atmosphere.

I bemoan the loss of the specialty store, mom and pop places and corner diners. But New York is always changing, you can't fight that.
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Old 06-11-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Do you guys get the feeling that although NYC is safer than it's been in decades that people are extremely fixated on safety here? Just about every thread raises the issue of safety. What gives? Didn't the cleanup of the early 2000s drive crime down? I have a hard time answering these questions because the City is generally safe. There are pockets to watch out for but even those are much safer than they were in the 80s. I guess it's all relative you one's personal experience.
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Old 06-11-2010, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by queensgal123 View Post
I bemoan the loss of the specialty store, mom and pop places and corner diners. But New York is always changing, you can't fight that.
Don't you still have that in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx though? NYC is so ridiculously gigantic that I can't imagine the whole city being taken over by Yuppies, Starbucks and Duane Reades. DC, on the other hand, is so small that I can see the entire city being sterilized by big chain stores and trust fund babies.
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Old 06-11-2010, 02:51 PM
 
Location: NYC
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Don't you still have that in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx though? NYC is so ridiculously gigantic that I can't imagine the whole city being taken over by Yuppies, Starbucks and Duane Reades. DC, on the other hand, is so small that I can see the entire city being sterilized by big chain stores and trust fund babies.
The whole city isn't being taken over by yuppies. Starbucks, maybe and definitely Duane Reade ... and banks.

Seriously, though ... these places could pay the rent and the mom & pop stores were pushed out.

I do miss places like the Italian bakery and the bagel shop in my old neighborhood that were family run and operated. That whole block was torn down and a Burger King went up, then that was torn down and now there's a Duane Reade. I'm all for progress but Burger King and Duane Reade are dime a dozen, places you can find in any suburban American town. It's the old, charming places that made things unique and special. Old timers like me aren't resistant to change. I think you're misinterpreting nostalgia for resitance.
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Old 06-11-2010, 03:27 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Don't you still have that in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx though? NYC is so ridiculously gigantic that I can't imagine the whole city being taken over by Yuppies, Starbucks and Duane Reades. DC, on the other hand, is so small that I can see the entire city being sterilized by big chain stores and trust fund babies.
The entire country has been homogenized. New York has it bad, but it's far, far worse in any other city. And in the suburbs? There are no independent stores or restaurants anymore, anywhere, period.

In New York at least we have a few, old New York institutions but they're nearly all high-end: Bergdorf's, Barneys, Lord and Taylor, Zabars, Peter Lugar, etc. Only the rich can afford to go to these places. Frankly, it's the poor who go to chains the most. Manhattanites don't eat at Applebee's.

Yes, it's sad that the chains are encroaching, but that's one trend that cannot be blamed on yuppies and hipsters. They go the greenmarket and shop in boutiques. In fact, they're the only thing preventing the city from being turned into a Jersey mall with subway service.
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Old 06-11-2010, 03:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by queensgrl View Post
The whole city isn't being taken over by yuppies. Starbucks, maybe and definitely Duane Reade ... and banks.

Seriously, though ... these places could pay the rent and the mom & pop stores were pushed out.

I do miss places like the Italian bakery and the bagel shop in my old neighborhood that were family run and operated. That whole block was torn down and a Burger King went up, then that was torn down and now there's a Duane Reade. I'm all for progress but Burger King and Duane Reade are dime a dozen, places you can find in any suburban American town. It's the old, charming places that made things unique and special. Old timers like me aren't resistant to change. I think you're misinterpreting nostalgia for resitance.
I miss candy stores too. They have disappeared.

The national chain phenomena is just a product of changing times. There's good things and bad things about it. However, New York City really was one of the last places in the country to get large national chains. An economist once explained to me why it was this way. Not only did corporate chains come into the city, but New York institutions like Macy's, Bloomingdale's, and FAO Schwartz became "corporatized" and also became national retail outlets.

There is one exception - Woolworth's. That was a chain retailer that was all over for a very long time.
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Old 06-11-2010, 07:47 PM
 
Location: NYC
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In my old neighborhood, Woolworth's was replaced by a dollar store. Woolworth's pretty much sold the same stuff as the dollar store. We also had a Kress when I lived in Rochdale Village. Funny, we called these the five-and-dime store. I miss the candy store too. For those of you who don't understand my nostalgia, read through the posts on this site, Memories of Laurelton. Hopefully it'll give you a better idea of the way things used to be
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Old 06-11-2010, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Central Virginia
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Do you guys get the feeling that although NYC is safer than it's been in decades that people are extremely fixated on safety here?
Because safety is fleeting. A city can quickly change to unsafe. It's easy to forget the the high crime parts of the city in the 70's and 80's were not always like that. I had family in Brooklyn. My parents said in the 40's and 50's you never, ever felt unsafe. My dad's grandmother lived alone and was never scared. That started changing in the 60's and by the 70's it became as safe as a warzone. Things change and anyone who is old enough to remember the days of crime doesn't want to see that happen again.
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Old 06-11-2010, 10:00 PM
 
7,551 posts, read 7,981,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by queensgrl View Post
In my old neighborhood, Woolworth's was replaced by a dollar store. Woolworth's pretty much sold the same stuff as the dollar store. We also had a Kress when I lived in Rochdale Village. Funny, we called these the five-and-dime store. I miss the candy store too. For those of you who don't understand my nostalgia, read through the posts on this site, Memories of Laurelton. Hopefully it'll give you a better idea of the way things used to be
Yes, you can find many of the products sold in the old Woolsorth's at a dollar store. Many Woolworth's also had a lunch counter. Does anyone remember popping the balloon to get your meal for a penny? Woolworth's sold sewing patterns and sewing notions, as well as yarn and knitting/hooks/crochet/crewl supplies. The dollar store doesn't carry that. They also sold cheap clothes, socks, cheap sneakers, etc. Lamston's and McCrory's were similar to Woolworths, but Woolworths was a much bigger retailer. Oh and Woolworths, and McCory's also had pet departments, selling fish, hansters, and birds.
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Old 06-11-2010, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,141 posts, read 2,783,818 times
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Originally Posted by Yankeerose00 View Post
Because safety is fleeting. A city can quickly change to unsafe. It's easy to forget the the high crime parts of the city in the 70's and 80's were not always like that. I had family in Brooklyn. My parents said in the 40's and 50's you never, ever felt unsafe. My dad's grandmother lived alone and was never scared. That started changing in the 60's and by the 70's it became as safe as a warzone. Things change and anyone who is old enough to remember the days of crime doesn't want to see that happen again.
Well said and it is only worsened by the fact that crime in NYC unlike many other areas of the country is "block by block".
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