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Old 07-21-2010, 12:25 PM
 
9,341 posts, read 24,676,301 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
The Giants also left for San Francisco while the Athletics left for Oakland.
The Philadelphia Athletics first moved to Kansas City, and then, later, to Oakland.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:28 PM
 
Location: NYC
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Here's another interesting NYTimes piece that described an event in March 1974, sponsored by the Jewish Council of Laurelton, to attract more white families to the "picturesque, tree-lined, middle-class community," which was 50/50 at the time. The average house was $38K (DANG, now they're 10x that.). About 250 young white couples attended.

According to the article, Laurelton residents were fighting to keep the nabe racially balanced. "They've been fighting since the middle 1960s, when blacks first arrived, prompting what they said were block-busting attempts by some real estate brokers. Those efforts were squelched when Laurelton residents established their own free listing service. However, "The residents say that brokers still engage in a practice called 'racial steering,' guiding prospective white buyers to predominantly white, northern Queens.

Unfortunately, Laurelton had reached the tipping point by then and the whites left shortly after this was published. They probably didn't succeed in getting enough people to move in and they tossed in the towel.

Sorry I can't link to it directly, but here's citation.

Laurelton Owners Rally to Attract Buyers; Laurelton Owners Rally
By JUDY KLEMESRUD. New York Times . New York, N.Y.: Mar 31, 1974. pg. 399, 2 pgs. They came, they saw, they munched hamantash. They were even offered a free membership in a synagogue if they bought a house. And the homes they inspected were some of the best buys in New York City: Prewar Tudors, capes and colonials for $33,000 and UV.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Greenspan View Post
The Philadelphia Athletics first moved to Kansas City, and then, later, to Oakland.
You are correct. Oakland-related franchises certainly move around a lot.
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Old 07-21-2010, 01:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
You are correct. Oakland-related franchises certainly move around a lot.:cool:
There was one franchise that bucked the east-to-west trend, when the St. Louis Browns became the Baltimore Orioles.

Do you know what happened to the original Baltimore Orioles of Wee Willie Keeler fame?
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Old 07-21-2010, 02:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Greenspan View Post
There was one franchise that bucked the east-to-west trend, when the St. Louis Browns became the Baltimore Orioles.

Do you know what happened to the original Baltimore Orioles of Wee Willie Keeler fame?
Are they the ones that became the New York Highlanders who then became the New York Yankees?
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Old 07-21-2010, 02:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Are they the ones that became the New York Highlanders who then became the New York Yankees?
You got it.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
As for white flight and the burbs, there is no doubt that some did not want to live near blacks- indeed there are middle class blacks who do not want to live near poor blacks and Hispanics. However, it was probably more a desire to leave crampt dwellings (think of Ralph Kramden's abode) and move into larger, modern dwellings with yards. Not an unappealing picture for anyone. And the 1950s was the first time that common folk were able to do so. Factor in automobiles becoming standard items, cheap gas, and the general forward-looking mood of the times.
I'll add that the suburbanization movement in the post WWII period pretty much was limited to whites because a lot of the subdivisions excluded prospective black residents who would be otherwise eligible to live there. Levitowns were notorious for excluding blacks until about the 1970s.
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Old 07-22-2010, 07:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
I'll add that the suburbanization movement in the post WWII period pretty much was limited to whites because a lot of the subdivisions excluded prospective black residents who would be otherwise eligible to live there. Levitowns were notorious for excluding blacks until about the 1970s.
There is no doubt that is true.
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Old 07-22-2010, 08:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mekitor View Post
Yeah but selling like this is crazy if you think you can make a fortune. The property values go down. Then they sell for less. Less commissions. But who was buying then? The blacks and hispanics were for the most part renters in those days. Did they bought to rent to poor Black and Hispanic people? Crazy thinking if you ask me.
The first Blacks and Latinos who moved into predominantly white areas were NOT renters. They were homeowners. They were professionals, civil servant workers and entrepreneurs. They were not poor, renters, uneducated, criminals or uncivil people. Let's first remember that.

My family moved from Harlem in the 1960s to neighborhoods in SE Queens and parts of Brooklyn (such as Williamsburg). When they moved in, they were one of few black families living in the area. They worked hard, put their children in parochial schools and kept up the houses. Fear of losing property value and yes, racism, caused many of their neighbors to sell.

I am so glad this thread was brought up as so many misconceptions about Blacks and Latinos in NYC have been spreading rampant on this forum.
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Old 07-22-2010, 03:55 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,511,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vitalove View Post
The first Blacks and Latinos who moved into predominantly white areas were NOT renters. They were homeowners. They were professionals, civil servant workers and entrepreneurs. They were not poor, renters, uneducated, criminals or uncivil people. Let's first remember that.

My family moved from Harlem in the 1960s to neighborhoods in SE Queens and parts of Brooklyn (such as Williamsburg). When they moved in, they were one of few black families living in the area. They worked hard, put their children in parochial schools and kept up the houses. Fear of losing property value and yes, racism, caused many of their neighbors to sell.

I am so glad this thread was brought up as so many misconceptions about Blacks and Latinos in NYC have been spreading rampant on this forum.
Thank you, Vitalove. I keep trying to crank out a similar message.
My family sounds like yours. My folks bought a co-op in '64 and their house in '68 (both in Queens). They were a teacher and an administrator who raised two wonderful kids who attended specialized high schools and top tier colleges. I grew up surrounded by families like my own.

I have come to the conclusion that a lot of the posters on this forum were too young to experience the NYC that we experienced. And, I guess it's hard for them to imagine a good, all black, solidly middle-class, well-maintained neighborhood if they've never seen one. Most of my parents' peers and mine have left the city for the southeast and the burbs. For better or worse, my old nabe is definitely not what it used to be.
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