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Old 05-22-2011, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
6,624 posts, read 11,578,423 times
Reputation: 4216

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hershey48 View Post
I read that on the nyc teaching fellows website.

This is what I found at the NYC teaching fellow's website. For someone with just a bachelors they start at $43K then with a masters you start at around 55K.

NYCTF - What is the Fellowship - Salary & Benefits (http://www.nyctf.org/the_fellowship/salary.html - broken link)


I spoke with someone this week who told me that NYC just hired 5,000 more teachers.
You could not have "read that NYC teachers start at 60,000 on the NYC teaching fellows website" because the teaching fellows website doesn't say that. Nowhere, under any circumstances,including a masters plus 30 credits toward a phd does a NYC teacher START at 60,000.

Teaching fellows are paid the same as the regular NYC teachers.This salary schedule NYC Teachers Salary Schedule | United Federation of Teachers
is the official NYC teachers salary schedule,not the teaching fellows interpretation of the salary schedule.The left hand column are the steps,or years teaching.If you read the chart you will see that the earliest one can achieve a 60,000 NYC teaching salary with a masters is is after 6 years with differentials C2+ID+PD.

The teaching fellows program gives little, if any support to fellows and most of the fellows "graduates" in the last few years have been unable to find permanent teaching positions.Getting accepted into the teaching fellows program is not the same as getting a teaching job.

Anyone who told you that NYC "just hired 5,000 teachers" is misinformed at best,maybe a bit loony.
http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dai...-teachers-axed

Last edited by bluedog2; 05-22-2011 at 07:25 PM..
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Old 05-22-2011, 07:30 PM
 
863 posts, read 855,333 times
Reputation: 645
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
You could not have "read that NYC teachers start at 60,000 on the NYC teaching fellows website" because the teaching fellows website doesn't say that. Nowhere, under any circumstances,including a masters plus 30 credits toward a phd does a NYC teacher START at 60,000.

Teaching fellows are paid the same as the regular NYC teachers.This salary schedule NYC Teachers Salary Schedule | United Federation of Teachers
is the official NYC teachers salary schedule,not the teaching fellows interpretation of the salary schedule.The left hand column are the steps,or years teaching.If you read the chart you will see that the earliest one can achieve a 60,000 NYC teaching salary with a masters is is after 6 years with differentials C2+ID+PD.

The teaching fellows program gives little, if any support to fellows and most of the fellows "graduates" in the last few years have been unable to find permanent teaching positions.Getting accepted into the teaching fellows program is not the same as getting a teaching job.

Anyone who told you that NYC "just hired 5,000 teachers" is misinformed at best,maybe a bit loony.
Bloomberg's Budget: 6,000 NYC Teachers Axed | New York Daily News
Ok. Not trying to argue. I guess you are in the education field so you know best.
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Old 05-22-2011, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
6,624 posts, read 11,578,423 times
Reputation: 4216
Quote:
Originally Posted by hershey48 View Post
Ok. Not trying to argue. I guess you are in the education field so you know best.
Sorry if a little heavy.I guess I'm a little sensitive because I am a teacher and it's bad enough as it is with so many people thinking teachers are overpaid.The last thing NYC teachers need is people thinking their starting salaries are 30% more than they actually are !
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Old 05-22-2011, 07:55 PM
 
863 posts, read 855,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
Sorry if a little heavy.I guess I'm a little sensitive because I am a teacher and it's bad enough as it is with so many people thinking teachers are overpaid.The last thing NYC teachers need is people thinking their starting salaries are 30% more than they actually are !
Ok gotcha.
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:44 AM
 
1,128 posts, read 1,745,131 times
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How do you get a bachelors in journalism and a masters in teaching? It seems to me that doing so means skipping a lot of important steps, seeing as an undergrad student learns a lot of necessary information about teaching through obtaining his/her bachelors degree in education.
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Old 05-26-2011, 08:42 PM
 
59 posts, read 80,982 times
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A lot of people in my classes had other careers before switching. Some were flight attendants, some were finance executives, some were executive assistants. I had to take some pre-requisite classes before starting the program.

The reason I had so many jobs was because all of them except paralegal and telemarketing, were seasonal/temporary work. I would work for a specific amount of time and then have to look for another job.

When I left college, I interviewed at many media places (magazines, tv stations, online publications), but I didn't get the job. I was so focused on getting a tv job, but not getting that important first job, unlike some of my classmates, who work at FOX Business News and TLC. So I ended up taking what I could get, which was first paralegal, then telemarketing, then working at a group home, holiday retail, etc.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:51 AM
 
1,090 posts, read 1,731,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by butterfly95 View Post
I have a Bachelor's degree in journalism and graduated in 2007. Since then I have been doing many different kinds of jobs, mostly temp. I have been a paralegal (the job ad said they would provide training, however I got no training and it's a very precise job), a bag checker at a college, a telemarketer, a tutor, a caretaker at a home for the mentally disabled, a substitute teacher (I'm trying to renew my sub license but principals don't want to give nominations anymore), a canvasser (handed out election literature to voters during election time), a holiday retail worker, and most recently, a tutor/teacher at an after-school program for 15 hours a week, where I was a temporary floater. None of these jobs provided benefits or decent income.

I would like to find a job that pays well for entry-level (over $24k/year) and has benefits like vacation time, sick time, etc. I see company websites that say they offer all that stuff, but they're very competitive to get into. Maybe having a liberal arts degree hurt me in regards to getting competitive jobs, i don't know.

Right now I'm getting my masters in elementary education, I really enjoy teaching kids and working with them. I want to teach grades k-8.

Has anyone here had stable work with a good salary since leaving college? How did you obtain it? What field is it in?
Nope, not really. Unless you have a HIGHLY specialized degree--we're ALL on the same boat. I worked at an agency that was throwing BSBA/MBA resumes in the trash by the dozen. These people graduated from GOOD schools too. That's just NYC for you. It's not going to change. It's only going to get worse. Make a move...elsewhere. Don't sit around here broke. Spread your wings.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:19 AM
 
17 posts, read 23,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by butterfly95 View Post
Has anyone here had stable work with a good salary since leaving college? How did you obtain it? What field is it in?
Healthcare.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:30 AM
 
1,090 posts, read 1,731,350 times
Reputation: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by the expat View Post
Healthcare.
WRONG. Health care is NOT a great field at ALL. Unless you're a M.D. or some kind of Therapist--forget it. It's not the highest paying either and it's completely flooded.

I know over a dozen BSN RNs who have been unemployed for over a year. I left nursing and I couldn't be happier. Glad it didn't take me years to figure it all out. I stopped listening to the government, media and society and figured it all out on my own--healthcare/nursing is NOT where it's at.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
1,415 posts, read 1,596,633 times
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I wouldn't bank on finding a teaching job either, whether its in NYC or the suburbs like Westchester or Long Island. The field is extremely saturated and many school districts are firing teachers or consolidating schools with existing staff so that class sizes are bigger. You have a better chance of landing a job in religious school (ie Catholic elementary schools) but I heard the salaries for those positions are dreadfully low.

FWIW, "high salary" jobs are usually NOT given to entry level people. Just recalling my own experience and those of my friends, many started out in crappy paying positions (as in $30-50K range) and after gaining 1-3 years of experience in that area, either demanded promotions or found jobs elsewhere. For example: my company starts new Insurance Company Claim Reps at around $ 60K-75K however the majority of them were hired because they proved their worth at lower paid positions elsewhere..so unfortunately, I dont really think there are "high paying entry level" positions in this market. You either take a lower paying job and work your way up, or try to get as much relevant experience for the field you want in order to negotiate a higher salary somewhere else.
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