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Old 05-25-2011, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
6,667 posts, read 11,634,633 times
Reputation: 4249

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkybumpkin View Post
I guess it depends on what you're looking for.

I have lived in several places outside of NYC and I did have an easier time there vs. NYC. The only place that was not as great was SoCal, but I still consider the quality of life much better because you have awesome weather and beaches..which are free!--and they make up for a lot lol. Otherwise, it's expensive and the pay is crap as well.
Well,we agree on that.Southern California is one of the places I could never live in.I cringe at even visiting.
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Old 05-25-2011, 11:58 AM
 
187 posts, read 247,548 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
Well,we agree on that.Southern California is one of the places I could never live in.I cringe at even visiting.
I would actually LOVE to move to Los Angeles. I was all set to go, but then my father was diagnosed with cancer and I decided it was important to stay and be close to my family. Now that he has passed away, I don't see how I can move that far away from my mother. I'm left with trying to find happiness here.
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Old 05-25-2011, 12:03 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,555 posts, read 2,212,294 times
Reputation: 908
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizfromtheBronx View Post
@ NYBorn - what dept in Pfizer did you work for? I've been here on and off for 10 years, also at HQ.
Small world! I worked at Pfizer HQ in two departments: My first year with Pfizer was spent working in Marketing Operations, then I worked in PPG Europe Medical & Regulatory Affairs.

You have brought back some good memories. Do they still have the all you can eat buffet on the second floor down the hall from the cafeteria? Loved going there on Wednesdays for Italian day. The company store was another great thing....but heard from friends that they closed it. Also funny that you have the Bronx in your screen name......I used to live on Pelham Parkway in the Bronx a few blocks from the Bronx Zoo. Another lady that I know worked in Pfizer's legal division and also lives in the Bronx.

What department are you in? PM me.
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Old 05-25-2011, 12:11 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,555 posts, read 2,212,294 times
Reputation: 908
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
The problem with this calculator thing is that you have to be willing to live in a lot of these places.It does me no good to calculate and compare my cost of living with someplace like South Carolina because I wouldn't even think about living there under any circumstances,including a substantially higher salary.And yes,I have been there and I have been to most of the US so it's not like I'm talking off the top of my head.Spending a weekend in some places in the US is what would make me want to run for the hills.

There are 4 or 5 places in the US that I could consider living in( like SF,Boston and a few others) but the cost of living in those places is pretty much the same as NYC.

I think it would be great though if everyone who wants to leave NYC and would have no problem settling in places like South Carolina, Texas, Atlanta,etc would leave.It would free up jobs and apartments for everyone else.It might even create upward pressure on salaries and downward pressure on rents if everyone would leave at the same time.
I am so with you on this.....cut the demand to live here and the prices for apartments, houses and everything else will go down. Problem is that those who would be willing to live in other states would have to be retired.

Otherwise when they see how limited the job opportunities and the low wage pay is in the southern states they will run right back to NYC like I did.
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Old 05-25-2011, 12:43 PM
 
1,093 posts, read 1,691,257 times
Reputation: 515
Jobs and housing etc etc are all tied to supply & demand made available by local and international forces which all affect one another. I'm neither supply side or demand side but I believe it's somewhere between both.

Anyhow, paycut isn't just NYC thing or job industry thing. It's tied to current economy and changing model of different industries. Here's one for lawyers...

At Well-Paying Law Firms, a Low-Paid Corner - Yahoo! Finance (http://finance.yahoo.com/news/At-WellPaying-Law-Firms-a-nytimes-1899956294.html?x=0&.v=1 - broken link)

There's already some movement of folks are returning from southern or midwest states that couldn't find a job and hope they can find one in bigger cities. Census 2020 will pretty surely reflect this... Not to mention, some jobs and creme de creme of 'em won't leave certain areas.
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Old 05-25-2011, 02:21 PM
 
Location: New York City
3,487 posts, read 2,790,742 times
Reputation: 2639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephanie1990 View Post
I just wanted to say that I am in the same boat, here in NYC. I moved here a couple of years ago, thinking there would be opportunites abound and great pay to boot. I was wrong. The comment about standing in the subway, all dressed up and wanting to cry was me yesterday, at about 6:00 p.m after yet another interview that went nowhere. I don't expect to hear back from them and quite frankly don't care if I do. I am currently working in in Brooklyn, but not making near enough to live on in NYC while interviewing with companies in the city hoping to get a better paying job. They are all admin jobs, not paying much more, unfortuately.

My lease is up on my way overpriced shoebox apt. in Park Slope in August. If I don't get the job I am interviewing for tomorrow (third interview), which actually pays enough that I could justify staying here, I think I am going to move on. The stress of living here and the high cost of living is simply not worth it. Two years of being here has proven that point.
It's a personal decision obviously, but If you're contemplating going back "home", I'd encourage you to take a week off if you can and go back for a visit. Put everything in the most realistic perspective as possible before you make any big decisions. You may find yourself magically remembering all the reasons you left in the first place once you're back in that environment. Obviously you're making ends meet if you've managed for two years already, and as long as your job isn't horrible and you don't hate it you may regret throwing it all away sometime down the line if you pack up and leave out of frustration.

Just sayin'
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Old 05-25-2011, 03:13 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,555 posts, read 2,212,294 times
Reputation: 908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephanie1990 View Post
I just wanted to say that I am in the same boat, here in NYC. I moved here a couple of years ago, thinking there would be opportunites abound and great pay to boot. I was wrong. The comment about standing in the subway, all dressed up and wanting to cry was me yesterday, at about 6:00 p.m after yet another interview that went nowhere. I don't expect to hear back from them and quite frankly don't care if I do. I am currently working in in Brooklyn, but not making near enough to live on in NYC while interviewing with companies in the city hoping to get a better paying job. They are all admin jobs, not paying much more, unfortuately.

My lease is up on my way overpriced shoebox apt. in Park Slope in August. If I don't get the job I am interviewing for tomorrow (third interview), which actually pays enough that I could justify staying here, I think I am going to move on. The stress of living here and the high cost of living is simply not worth it. Two years of being here has proven that point.
Sorry to hear that you are having a hard time. In a major city with over 8 million people living here there is definitely fierce competition for the better paying jobs. A lot of highly educated people here....bachelors and masters degrees are a dime a dozen here like breathing air. Very hard to stand out in a crowd where most around you have just as much education and experience as you do. NYC is not for everyone....this city can either make you or break you. Many of us who were born here have been chewed up and spit out on many occasions....a tough place for sure!
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Old 05-25-2011, 03:54 PM
 
1,259 posts, read 1,748,416 times
Reputation: 555
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizfromtheBronx View Post
I would actually LOVE to move to Los Angeles. I was all set to go, but then my father was diagnosed with cancer and I decided it was important to stay and be close to my family. Now that he has passed away, I don't see how I can move that far away from my mother. I'm left with trying to find happiness here.
here something my dad told me before he passed away in 2003 ..he told life is meant to be a great journry and go live it each day and now that your mother and i have pass do not think that you have to come back to area and live out your life..

go see what over the next hill and if you do not make it back here to be buried here then we meet on the other side and say our hello's there with the rest of the family that has left before us ..
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Old 05-25-2011, 04:11 PM
 
187 posts, read 247,548 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by henry1 View Post
here something my dad told me before he passed away in 2003 ..he told life is meant to be a great journry and go live it each day and now that your mother and i have pass do not think that you have to come back to area and live out your life..

go see what over the next hill and if you do not make it back here to be buried here then we meet on the other side and say our hello's there with the rest of the family that has left before us ..
If my parents had passed together, there would be no question. I'd be on the next flight. (Well, in the next moving truck...)

We're a very tightly knit family, though...and it's very important (and healing) to be able to spend time with my mother. I wouldn't say I spend significantly more time with her now than I did before he got sick (I go there for dinner 1x per week) but it's very important for me to know she is doing ok.

Don't get me wrong...I don't hate NYC...I've just never lived anywhere else. I'm lucky...I have a really good job that pays well with fantastic benefits, plus a nght job that also pays really well. I have family support if needed right here (by support I am referring more to emotional than financial, don't need financial support but if **** hit the fan I could always move home).

Who knows...maybe in a few years, once we've healed a little more (my dad only passed in Feb) I can re-consider. I kinda feel like I'll be too old then...I'm 32 now.
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Old 05-25-2011, 11:30 PM
 
21 posts, read 13,430 times
Reputation: 37
From an entrepreneurs perspective:

1. The first rule of hiring for us is about mitigating risk - how much is this hire going to cost me if it fails? So the initial offer is always smaller to lower the risk. In boom times, its more risky not to make that "debatable" hire.
2. Once the employee is up and running for six months, more often than not, their true worth would be known. Employees who have measurable jobs can demand and get better packages as we employers also do not have the time and its costly to recruit, train and hope for the best. Even a receptionist can create value and be proactive about making improvements.
3. Most people who just graduated from college know little about the business world - the sense of entitlement (I need 65K or else) does not work in todays market.

No matter how bad the "job" market is, entrepreneurs and department heads are always searching for solutions - how to sell more, how to reduce costs, how to increase margins, how to operate better, - so if you come into my office with a solution for a real problem I have, you will always have my ear and you will be worth more money since you have taken the time to research my industry and know about its inherent problems and bring fresh face ideas to the table.

To give an idea, if I am hiring a web marketer/ designer, the job probably goes to the person who researched my competitors web sites, found flaws in mine, had valid suggestions and had the skills to make the necessary fixes. Degrees wouldn't matter.

The jobs are out there - it just takes a little more drive and creativity to make yourself stand out. Getting in the door is important - maybe you can knock away a couple of under performing folks and get to the next level. My 2 cents.
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