U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 02:06 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,549 posts, read 1,967,786 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Well OJT can never completely go away...Companies these days have such proprietery systems and databases, and no 2 corporate cultures are alike anymore...that OJT is a must in some aspects, you can have a Masters degree in your field and come into a company in your field and be completely clueless on how things get done. I've seen it.
Yeah there are a lot of software programs on my resume that are specific to previous employers that I have worked for. This is the reason why it always kills me when I read a job description and one of the requirements are that the person be *proficient* in x,y,z company software programs!

How on earth can a new hire be proficient in your companies software if they have never worked for you before?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 05-30-2011, 02:17 PM
 
Location: New York City
3,155 posts, read 2,103,384 times
Reputation: 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkybumpkin View Post
Our country is out of touch with reality. The vast majority of jobs require a degree, but in actuality, none of the degrees have anything to do with the jobs. They are all positions that one can learn in a few days to a couple of weeks, from what I have seen. Who benefits? I'm not sure. The cost of being educated, in America, is such a steep one. There's so much injustice in our system. The recession has magnified these injustices as well...
Quote:
Originally Posted by grimace8 View Post
the student loan industry benefits. one of the main entities within that industry had a wine tasting event in napa valley under the veil of how can we improve the industry? (yeah right. i bet it was more like how can we pump more money OUT of american youth and families?)
Not to mention the Colleges and Universities themselves. It's easy to see the cause and effect relationship between the easy money for students and the steadily rising tuition costs the past couple of decades. They've been charging more and more simply because they can, and nowadays they've got all the fancy new buildings and facilities and 7-figure-salaried university presidents to go along with it.

Not hard at all to see what's happening with the state of higher education in America today; an enormous wealth transfer to the Universities and student loan lending banks from students and middle/working class families. There's an education "bubble" that hasn't popped yet, but it will.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 02:35 PM
 
Location: New York City
3,155 posts, read 2,103,384 times
Reputation: 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by florida_boy View Post
We already have "for profit" colleges and university that are publicly listed. I think one recent article said that these schools only enroll about 10% of all students nationwide, but that 25% of all financial aid goes to students of these for profit institutions. Many will not have the ability to repay their loan upon graduation. It's probably the next major financial crisis just waiting to happen

For-Profit College Stocks Plunge on Lower Enrollment - Heather Struck - Market Pulse - Forbes
Oh yeah. See ticker symbol "APOL" for the most notable one. (Then prepare for your daily dose of outrage.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 02:36 PM
 
3,109 posts, read 2,255,548 times
Reputation: 1189
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanAdventurer View Post
There's an education "bubble" that hasn't popped yet, but it will.
that would be cool (for it to pop), but as long as corporations continue to demand 4-year degrees for simple jobs, the bubble will remain strong, sadly. let's also include the corporations as residual beneficiaries because they know it's easier to manipulate/exploit an employee who is up to his/her eyeballs in student debt. such an employee will take alot of abuse because he/she feels stuck between a rock and a hard place. i wouldn't say i'm a conspiracy theorist but, c'mon, look at all the pieces.

(the human tendency to exploit can get effin' NASTY, would you all agree?)

Last edited by grimace8; 05-30-2011 at 02:45 PM.. Reason: added the word "sadly"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 04:40 PM
 
Location: New York City
3,155 posts, read 2,103,384 times
Reputation: 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by grimace8 View Post
that would be cool (for it to pop), but as long as corporations continue to demand 4-year degrees for simple jobs, the bubble will remain strong, sadly. let's also include the corporations as residual beneficiaries because they know it's easier to manipulate/exploit an employee who is up to his/her eyeballs in student debt. such an employee will take alot of abuse because he/she feels stuck between a rock and a hard place. i wouldn't say i'm a conspiracy theorist but, c'mon, look at all the pieces.

(the human tendency to exploit can get effin' NASTY, would you all agree?)
Big corporations also are 2nd tier benefactors to that madness, because of the "indentured servant who'll do anything" effect it has on it's younger employees who are buried in debt. Unless of course you are a big corporation hawking college as a cure-all (such as Phoenix), then you move back up to a 1st tier benefactor and your scumbag score rises respectively.

The bubble will burst when enough people believe they've been taken for fools...paying huge sums of money for pieces of paper that guarantee them nothing, and enough of them will either start defaulting on their loans to make the debt systemically toxic to the lending institutions (somewhat like subprime mortgages did in 2005-08), or they will just end up foregoing college altogether and taking the demand away from the supply. Only then will you see a healthy amount of demand destruction for higher education, which will eventually lead to the price and relative value of the pieces of paper falling back in line with historical averages. I think we're very close to that point right now...people are becoming pissed. I'd sell my APOL or SLM stock right now if I had any.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 09:38 PM
 
3,109 posts, read 2,255,548 times
Reputation: 1189
well y'know what they say about ice cream trucks... that they're just fronts for selling weed, crack, etc.

colleges = ice cream truck

corporations = drug kingpin

when my nephews were around 7 and 8 i told them they "need college". i remember i drew them a diagram and everything while i lectured them at grandma's table. i guess i was sticking my nose where it didn't belong. but-- they didn't take my advice fully. they did do some post-high school education but from what i understand it wasn't y'know, college college.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 10:21 PM
 
1,044 posts, read 1,251,321 times
Reputation: 466
Few things about college.

Now days, Bachelor degree is a must for most jobs like High school diploma was a must for most jobs in old days. It's just the way it is since we're mature modernized and well educated country. Going to college is a standard now so if everyone has college degree, of course it'll be norm to have one. Also, we're not actually that bad off with over educated population. In some Asian countries like South Korea, about 90% of students end up with some collegiate degree, 4 year, 2 year or vocational. Let's not forget modern countries in Europe like Greece with same problem. Ton of over educated greeks can't find job because everybody has college degree and held out by going back to school. Which is also happening in US, many students going to MBA or MS program to ride out the bad job market.

College do cost helluva lot of money in US but that's because we as tax payers don't pay much of it or invest much into it compared to more social democracy orientated countries. I'm not saying we should or we shouldn't, just pointing it out. Also some private schools are pure bs in my opinion and you don't get your bang for your buck (aka your degree).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 10:33 PM
 
3,109 posts, read 2,255,548 times
Reputation: 1189
Quote:
Originally Posted by babo111 View Post
Now days, Bachelor degree is a must for most jobs like High school diploma was a must for most jobs in old days. It's just the way it is since we're mature modernized and well educated country. Going to college is a standard now so if everyone has college degree, of course it'll be norm to have one. Also, we're not actually that bad off with over educated population. In some Asian countries like South Korea, about 90% of students end up with some collegiate degree, 4 year, 2 year or vocational. Let's not forget modern countries in Europe like Greece with same problem. Ton of over educated greeks can't find job because everybody has college degree and held out by going back to school. Which is also happening in US, many students going to MBA or MS program to ride out the bad job market.
in the c-d colleges & universities forum, someone called it "credential inflation"

also:

Quote:
[Ohio University economics professor Richard] Vedder's work also yielded something surprising: The more money states spend on higher education, the less the economy grows — the reverse of long-held assumptions.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37136020...t-necessarily/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 05-30-2011, 11:27 PM
 
1,259 posts, read 1,449,418 times
Reputation: 531
Quote:
Originally Posted by deecbee View Post
OH, and don't get me started on the overuse of "interns"! There are a few regulations about the use of interns, but it's not usually enforced and a lot of industries, especially "coveted" industries in entertainment, fashion, advertising and marketing, etc use free labor from "interns". And no, they aren't always students getting credit (even though they're supposed to be). I've seen people in their 30's with families to support, working 20 hours for free at a big name company with the false hope that it'll jump-start their career into a well-paying position with them. There are legitimate, mutually beneficial internships out there but most of what I see is just a way to get out of hiring an employee.
that the one thing nice about my job is that we do not use the socalled interns personal it a by law of the business we are in that there is no unpaid personal on the jobsite by the state laws we have ..

plus i think the whole thing with them is a b,s type of work where you are worked like a dog then told at the end we are not hireing you and move onto the next person who step into there shoes and does the same thing to them ..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 06-03-2011, 09:18 PM
 
Location: BK
189 posts, read 556,048 times
Reputation: 87
Ugh, this has been my experience here too, I applied to over 100 jobs before getting a couple interviews, and settling for my one offer at $15.75 an hour/$28,900 a year. I might be content with it if I gained any worthwhile experience, but it's essentially just a call center type job, with little growth potential. The company actually offered a higher starting wage ($35,000) before the recession and didn't require a Bachelor's until recently. It's pretty disheartening after going to a good college and working hard all these years I am barely getting by and living in a crappy apt in a bad neighborhood. I once considered law school or grad school, but the risk of taking over $100k in loans with little improvement in job options makes it seem like a poor choice. Went to numerous temp agencies after graduating and they never found me anything. One of my regrets was working part-time my whole undergrad career, rather than taking some unpaid, but more marketable internships or even joining a frat to make some good connections, back then it seemed more responsible but in hind sight I feel like I shot myself in the foot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:11 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top