U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-11-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Glendale NY
4,841 posts, read 8,229,285 times
Reputation: 3523

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
This is what I have been saying for sometime. The economic. Slowdown forced many native new yorkers stay down for a while until things are in the clear including myself. Also many are stuck due to jobs and ill parents who they have to comfort and financially support.
I hear yeah. I was suppose to move to North Carolina last year, but didn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-11-2012, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,853 posts, read 7,631,032 times
Reputation: 1583
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
I hate the word "suburbanizing". I prefer integration into existing moderate and higher income communities. More accurate in reference to NYC.

Here is a article on Hispanic/Latinos in general and how with every generation the term becomes less relevant. This would further skew the stats on the PR experience.

Self-Identification among Hispanics Sociological Images
But aren't those "existing moderate and higher income communities" further away from the city center? They may not technically be outside the city limits, but they are generally further out, and more suburban in character than their old neighborhoods (i.e. rowhouses instead of apartment buildings)

Plus, the area might not necessarily be much better than the area they left, but it was cheaper. Somebody might move from say, East Harlem to Downtown Hempstead or something. Is it really much of a step up?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoomDan515 View Post
Actually it's more then that. 785,000 in 2000 vs 723,000 in 2010. Anyway, I believe that the PR decline, AA decline, and the White population decline has slowed down is due to the economy [many are stuck here]. I believe PR's will always has a solid presence in this city for a very long time, even though they will most likely be surpassed by other hispanic groups soon.
Don't forget that you still have the birth:death ratio (yes, I know you said it slowed and didn't stop, but I'm just pointing it out).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Bronx
16,204 posts, read 18,666,783 times
Reputation: 8162
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoomDan515 View Post
I hear yeah. I was suppose to move to North Carolina last year, but didn't.
Also May and June is around the corner you know what that is college! For many people graduating and is or from NYC will most likely leave the grity city for professional jobs in the sunbelt on the flip side many Transplants who are graduating this year will flock to NYC for jobs leaving behind suburbia! I too wanna move to NC I would move if I can find a suitable job and a suitable F and S girlfriend.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2012, 07:32 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,660,954 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmatechamp13 View Post
But aren't those "existing moderate and higher income communities" further away from the city center? They may not technically be outside the city limits, but they are generally further out, and more suburban in character than their old neighborhoods (i.e. rowhouses instead of apartment buildings)

Plus, the area might not necessarily be much better than the area they left, but it was cheaper. Somebody might move from say, East Harlem to Downtown Hempstead or something. Is it really much of a step up?

Don't forget that you still have the birth:death ratio (yes, I know you said it slowed and didn't stop, but I'm just pointing it out).
The destinations mentioned in the population study showed that the majority of moves are made within the city limits. I posted before where they're going, and they are neighborhoods that were formerly white, middle class, and suburban-like. In other words, a "step up." Southern Brooklyn & Staten Island were examples provided.

I also wrote a few times that the net loss includes death, due to the aging PR population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2012, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,853 posts, read 7,631,032 times
Reputation: 1583
Quote:
Originally Posted by queensgrl View Post
The destinations mentioned in the population study showed that the majority of moves are made within the city limits. I posted before where they're going, and they are neighborhoods that were formerly white, middle class, and suburban-like. In other words, a "step up." Southern Brooklyn & Staten Island were examples provided.

I also wrote a few times that the net loss includes death, due to the aging PR population.
Could you post a link to the study (or keywords I should be looking up)?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2012, 09:42 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,660,954 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmatechamp13 View Post
Could you post a link to the study (or keywords I should be looking up)?
Sorry, I can't. It was from a presentation I attended live. But I did post links to other info from the source. Scroll back to a post I made yesterday.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2012, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Helsinki, Finland
5,473 posts, read 9,549,271 times
Reputation: 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
This is what I have been saying for sometime. The economic. Slowdown forced many native new yorkers stay down for a while until things are in the clear including myself. Also many are stuck due to jobs and ill parents who they have to comfort and financially support.

True, as long as my uncle lives I'm stuck here I just can't leave him behind after all that his done for me. My sister left last August for greener pastures with her three kids after she found a suitable boyfriend who could provide her financial security. She has a college degree but she doesn't want or need to work, because the new boyfriend is financially secure. The only thing my sister don't like about this new arrengement is that the boyfriends mother who is atleast 80 lives in the same house. But she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's recently so my sister said that it's best to put her to a mental asylum next fall because she is mentally burdensome for her...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,660,954 times
Reputation: 1084
From some of the comments here, I'm sensing that there's quite a divide between middle class Puerto Ricans and those that are living in the inner city, projects, etc. It's as if you're speaking as if you know about them but that they're not really part of your lives ... hence the questions about where have they gone.

As I said in earlier posts, I went to HS with a lot or Puerto Ricans from the PJs and probably 95% of them have left NYC. No speculation there ... it's a fact. They joined the military, went to college, got good jobs and skipped out.

I'm wondering if you know people like this ... they would probably be the age of your parents, aunts/uncles, but their kids are in their 20s ...

Just wondering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2012, 09:10 AM
 
8,750 posts, read 16,048,945 times
Reputation: 4168
I think the same divide for middle class PRs and the destitute is the same as every other population...it is not unique to them. I will agree that in my personal observations and experience, PRs of every class have been exiting the city for decades, and although the economy is causing ALL groups to not move as much, PRs are still leaving.

And as the economy improves, they will no doubt resume their exodus, especially to places like Florida. However, I think we should also consider why many PRs will likely stay in NYC, or rather why NYC will have a significant PR presence for the foreseeablt future..ECONOMICS. And by that I mean, we have created a completely dependent class of people, who essentially live solely on a variety of safety nets which do not exist outside of the city. These people cannot leave, and likely will never leave, as they have all the comforts and conveniences, at a minimum level, which they could never enjoy outside of NYC. And why should they leave for that matter...their quality of life would be substantially worse...and therefore a fair number of PRs will never leave those housing projects or old tenement buildings so long as the government keeps paying for essentially all of their needs.

So while the population will still have a considerable presence here, the economic and political muscle is shifting to Central Florida, while NYC will simply be political poverty pimps making themselves rich by maintaining the population ignorant, poor, divided, and "victims." "The evil whites are out to get you, but I will take care of you...look I increased your section 8 voucher."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,660,954 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by SobroGuy View Post
I think the same divide for middle class PRs and the destitute is the same as every other population...it is not unique to them. I will agree that in my personal observations and experience, PRs of every class have been exiting the city for decades, and although the economy is causing ALL groups to not move as much, PRs are still leaving.

And as the economy improves, they will no doubt resume their exodus, especially to places like Florida. However, I think we should also consider why many PRs will likely stay in NYC, or rather why NYC will have a significant PR presence for the foreseeablt future..ECONOMICS. And by that I mean, we have created a completely dependent class of people, who essentially live solely on a variety of safety nets which do not exist outside of the city. These people cannot leave, and likely will never leave, as they have all the comforts and conveniences, at a minimum level, which they could never enjoy outside of NYC. And why should they leave for that matter...their quality of life would be substantially worse...and therefore a fair number of PRs will never leave those housing projects or old tenement buildings so long as the government keeps paying for essentially all of their needs.

So while the population will still have a considerable presence here, the economic and political muscle is shifting to Central Florida, while NYC will simply be political poverty pimps making themselves rich by maintaining the population ignorant, poor, divided, and "victims." "The evil whites are out to get you, but I will take care of you...look I increased your section 8 voucher."
I'll just offer some advice because I'm older and I have witnessed trends in lots of things -- not just population changes -- over the course of my 49 years.

You cannot predict the future looking in the rear view mirror. The Florida exodus happened for certain reasons with many ethnic groups. My parents and their civil servant African American friends went there too but my generation isn't going there. Jews went there before them but don't go there as much anymore either. In the blink of an eye, there could be another hot destination or destinations, that will emerge for reasons that we cannot determine today.

If I were you, I would not hold so tight onto the idea that most Puerto Ricans will populate Central Florida in the years to come. There's a lot of information that tells another story, and you just don't know what the future will bring.

As for those who remain here, trapped in the social welfare system, it's not only Puerto Ricans. There are lots of groups caught up in poverty. There has to be a willingness on their part to take the path out. It is possible but it takes a HUGE amount of self-discipline and a supportive social network, which is quite often what isn't present. There has to be dedication to education, making the most of the community even if it isn't the greatest. If we turn our neighborhoods into slums, we can turn them around too, just by deciding to have pride in where we live. I hate to have to think that the only way for places to become decent is for hipsters (regardless of race or ethnicity) to have to be the catalyst.

Like I said, I've lived in NYC a long time, and there was a time when being poor wasn't so associated with being hopeless.

Last edited by queensgrl; 04-13-2012 at 10:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top