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Old 07-01-2013, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,971 posts, read 17,517,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
Bloomberg is a social liberal/fiscal conservative who was traditionally a Democrat but changed his ticket in order to run for the Republican party and eventually announced independent status.

Guliani was not your traditional Republican either.

NYC is very liberal on a national scale. Manhattan, North Brooklyn, the Bronx, and West Queens are probably the most liberal areas in the US. The most conservative areas like SI, East Queens, and South Brooklyn are still left of center rather then right wing. Even our suburbs lean left. There is absolutely no comparison to conservative America.

I do agree that most cities lean Liberal and Democratic nationwide. But NYC would be more extreme, far left on a national scale.
True, true. Henry 10 had it all wrong.
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,137 posts, read 9,374,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ishmael27 View Post
I looking forward to move from NYC Bronx to Houston..Can I afford to buy a home with a maiden of $40,000?What are the best part of Houston to reside.
A 40k downpayment will give you entry into the better areas of Houston. Unfortunately, I live in the Austin area so I can't really comment about Houston neighborhoods. Houston is a good city for jobs and has a lot of the big city stuff. You might also want to consider Austin -- it is moderate, pretty, has decent nightlife, and is near San Antonio when you want the "big city" stuff. It is pricier than a number of areas in Texas, so be forewarned. You will not find a large home for $150,000 unless it's way out in the boonies.
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:55 PM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,636,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry10 View Post
No one is comparing NYC to the rest of the country. We are however comparing NYC to other large/substantial cities, in terms of its policies.

Repeating again -- in comparison to other large cities (LA, Boston, Chicago, SF, etc), NYC policies are relatively conservative. At least for the last 20 years. Heck, even welfare enrollment has dropped; read the Torah http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/17/ny...fare.html?_r=0
Liberalism is more then the current official city policy or an elected official. It's the mindset of the people. The people in NYC more often then not have very liberal outlooks on things. Comparable to SF/Portland/Ann Arbor/Seattle/ect. It's hard to state who is more liberal with absolute certainty. These places are just very Liberal.

Another thing, a lot of New Yorkers are not politically involved (in terms of elections not opinions), or there are many fractured groups for different movements (from ethnic groups to political stances). Certain areas are much more politically united (DC for example).

Who's more conservative? Rural Alabama or Missouri?
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Ubique
4,091 posts, read 2,949,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
True, true. Henry 10 had it all wrong.
You need to travel and learn some more. If you think you are escaping liberalism by going to another large city, you'll be in for a huge surprise.

I deal with municipalities throughout the country. I was shocked when I learned that in many medium or even small cities their bureaucracy is worse than our City Hall. And I know CH inside out.

For example, a part of North Atlanta just broke away from DeKalb County and they are calling themselves City of Brookhaven. Talk about regulation, red-tape, and mandates.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Ubique
4,091 posts, read 2,949,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
Liberalism is more then the current official city policy or an elected official. It's the mindset of the people. The people in NYC more often then not have very liberal outlooks on things. Comparable to SF/Portland/Ann Arbor/Seattle/ect. It's hard to state who is more liberal with absolute certainty. These places are just very Liberal.
You do understand that those liberal mayors were not elected there by a conservative electorate. The electorate in those cities is liberal, a lot more than you would think for a city where the Confederate flag still stands.

I am not talking about the 2-3 last years when Bloomie has turned upside down. Unlike you, I wasn't born yesterday and just learned NYC.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,971 posts, read 17,517,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry10 View Post
You need to travel and learn some more. If you think you are escaping liberalism by going to another large city, you'll be in for a huge surprise.

I deal with municipalities throughout the country. I was shocked when I learned that in many medium or even small cities their bureaucracy is worse than our City Hall. And I know CH inside out.

For example, a part of North Atlanta just broke away from DeKalb County and they are calling themselves City of Brookhaven. Talk about regulation, red-tape, and mandates.
I do travel often and take in the the strife of life. Its not about escsping liberalism its about the aesthetics of it which I encounter that throws me off. Any way thats good that or you managing different cities. Overall I dont care what you do and for you love of this city. Ovrall good for you.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Ubique
4,091 posts, read 2,949,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
Overall I dont care what you do and for you love of this city. Ovrall good for you.
Not sure where you got the idea that I would care where you'd go or stay.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:30 PM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,636,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry10 View Post
You do understand that those liberal mayors were not elected there by a conservative electorate. The electorate in those cities is liberal, a lot more than you would think for a city where the Confederate flag still stands.

I am not talking about the 2-3 last years when Bloomie has turned upside down. Unlike you, I wasn't born yesterday and just learned NYC.
I've been to all of those cities mentioned. I've traveled to every almost every part of the United States due to my previous occupation and just moved back to NYC only a few years ago.

My argument is that policy does not necessarily dictate a city's liberal stance. Voter turnout varies between cities and the people of NYC are definitely as liberal at the very least when compared to places like SF, Portland, Seattle, ect.
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Old 07-01-2013, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Ubique
4,091 posts, read 2,949,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
My argument is that policy does not necessarily dictate a city's liberal stance.
That's circular reasoning.

However, since the bottom fell out many political and social changes have happened. I tried to give clarity by expanding my reference to 20 years, but I am not sure myself it is indicative any more. Things are changing fast.
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Old 07-02-2013, 05:09 AM
 
23,306 posts, read 16,175,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twist07 View Post
Yeah back in the late 80's and don't forget Crown Heights in '91. But aside from police brutality, I can't think of a recent NYC incident that is comparable to things in recent LA history, the Mexican Mafia actually decreeing the purging of blacks from their neighborhoods which resulted in the killing of innocent people, even young children and not by accident. Black gangs in Compton who killed an older Mexican man in his car setting the whole community against each other. All these things happened within the previous decade. Whatever racial tension we have had here in recent years doesn't compare to what has happened in LA.
Compton, Watts, South Central, etc are pretty bad ghettos, and areas you just don't go to.

Not that NYC doesn't have very bad ghettoes, either.
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