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Old 12-13-2011, 12:50 PM
 
19 posts, read 41,183 times
Reputation: 13
Default Oil to gas conversion. Rip off or not??

So i want to to do an oil to gas conversion in my house. I already have gas coming into my house that supplies the hot water and stove. I had a plumber come in to look at the work and he said that he would need to run a new pipe from the main gas line in the street to my basement. He said that my current pipe is 1-1/4" and it needs to be 1-1/2". Seems a bit much. Also he is trying to convince me to stick with oil, as he said it would be better to get a new boiler. Any one have any specifics on this kind of job? I'msick and tired of oil deliveries and their prices.
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Old 12-13-2011, 02:27 PM
 
8,752 posts, read 8,611,515 times
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I don't have an answer on this, but depending on the size of your home and the gas requirement, you will likely need to get a larger pipe to handle the increased requirement. But that is speculation. The future is not great for oil or oil prices, and with shale gas expanding greatly, prices continue to slide for gas even during these winter months, and for the foreseeable future.

The bottom line is this: If you plan to live in your home for the long term, then I would agree to switch to gas. If you are planning to stay less than 10 years, I would say just get a new, more efficient oil furnace.
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Old 12-13-2011, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
6,368 posts, read 10,272,940 times
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Is this plumber "affiliated" with an oil company? Is this plumber certified to install and service natural gas appliances ? Many aren't or are afraid or don't want to deal with gas.

The arguments in favor of gas v. oil are so strong that I would automatically be very suspicious of the motive of a plumber who tried to persuade me otherwise.

Aside from being cleaner and usually cheaper,gas burners are almost maintenance free compared to oil burners.Perhaps the plumber would rather have the maintenance contract on the oil burner ?

Check and see if there are currently any tax breaks and rebates on purchasing and installing/converting to gas.Often the gas supplier will absorb most of the costs of a switch.
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Old 12-14-2011, 07:14 AM
 
19 posts, read 41,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
Is this plumber "affiliated" with an oil company? Is this plumber certified to install and service natural gas appliances ? Many aren't or are afraid or don't want to deal with gas.

The arguments in favor of gas v. oil are so strong that I would automatically be very suspicious of the motive of a plumber who tried to persuade me otherwise.

Aside from being cleaner and usually cheaper,gas burners are almost maintenance free compared to oil burners.Perhaps the plumber would rather have the maintenance contract on the oil burner ?

Check and see if there are currently any tax breaks and rebates on purchasing and installing/converting to gas.Often the gas supplier will absorb most of the costs of a switch.

thanks bluedog, the guy was a licensed plumber. However I've had my suspicions that he was affiliated with an oil company as he kept pushing the issue. I will call national grid now and see what kind of incentives are available.
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
10,581 posts, read 9,017,907 times
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I've got an engineering background and I can state with assurance that the difference in flow resistance between 1.25" and 1.5" is very slight.
Running a new line to the street mains sounds like he is trying to get himself a nice fee.

That said, there MAY be some City regualtions demanding a certain pipe size for new gas hookups...call the City.

Anyone who does NOT heat his house with gas is a fool given the costs and future expectations of alternative fuels (oil and electricity.) Of course if you can stick a solar heater on the roof, go for it.
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Old 12-21-2011, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
243 posts, read 144,996 times
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Anyone who does NOT heat his house with gas is a fool given the costs and future expectations of alternative fuels (oil and electricity.) Of course if you can stick a solar heater on the roof, go for it.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Call me a fool if you will, but OIL doesn't blow up a house like GAS will. I'll gladly pay a little more for a safe fuel.
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Old 12-21-2011, 05:38 PM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,901 posts, read 4,120,956 times
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First, where are you from? "National grid"? You must be a foreigner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johan85 View Post
So i want to to do an oil to gas conversion in my house. I already have gas coming into my house that supplies the hot water and stove.
So does virtuall everyone else in NYC. Gas for cooking and hot water is the standard.

Quote:
I had a plumber come in to look at the work and he said that he would need to run a new pipe from the main gas line in the street to my basement. He said that my current pipe is 1-1/4" and it needs to be 1-1/2". Seems a bit much.
Much for what?

Anyway, it may be some regulated standard. I would ask the Gas company to come out and advise. Also, I'd check with the Gas company re any tax and/or financial incentives which are provided as an incentive to convert. I'd also ask them for reccomended contractors.

Quote:
Also he is trying to convince me to stick with oil, as he said it would be better to get a new boiler. Any one have any specifics on this kind of job? I'msick and tired of oil deliveries and their prices.
First, I w/h 3 or 4 diverse contractors provide estimates. Not just a single guy.

As for the boiler??? You do realize that you will NEED to purchase a GAS fired boiler!!!

Sure you could convert an oil burner to gas, but that w/b stupid and inefficient. The money you might save is short money, wasted in the long term, you'll wind up spending more. Pay the money upfront for new boiler, and it will pay for itself over time.

Also, with a new modern boiler you can eliminate the inefficient gas hot water heater, which is burning gas 24/7 keeping water hot all the time, even when you don't need hot water and no one is home.

The most efficient methond (in this area) are boilers which contain a very small tank with electric coils inside which will instantly heat water as it is needed---on demand!

So, the frank matter is you should do your homework BEFORE calling the contractors. There is lots of info on the Internet, and thru your gas company. They used to have exhibits which you could visit.

The contractor you called seems to be a 'Yo', rather than a professional capable of installing either gas or oil, and s/b indifferent to either. Though capable and willing to advise intelligently.

My family converted during the early 80s, a year or so after purchasing a new house. The house had an ancient abestos covered oil boiler with a separate gas HW heater. This during the high oil inflationary days of the 80s, we were burning hundreds of dollars per month in an old drafty Victorian. The conversion was part of a renovation, and frankly kept us from going under, cut our bill by 75%.

Luck!
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Old 12-21-2011, 05:57 PM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,901 posts, read 4,120,956 times
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Sorry, didn't realize Brooklyn Union which had been bought by Keyspan is now 'National Grid'.

Anyway, I would do this:

Conversion made easy
https://www.powerofaction.com/howdoiconvert/

Contractor Program
http://www2.nationalgridus.com/pshom...x_ny_kedny.jsp

Might not be the cheapest route, but certainly w/b the most worry free. You get what you pay for.

Also check into there rebate program:
http://www2.nationalgridus.com/pshom...s_ny_kedny.jsp

Luck!

Last edited by jcoltrane; 12-21-2011 at 06:05 PM..
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Old 12-24-2011, 01:54 PM
 
8 posts, read 16,135 times
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Your oil tank is under ground? I hope it did not leak. You could be looking at a big big bill for the clean up and disposal. Which will not be covered by insurance. I paid some guy to come dig my tank up. I was able to submit soil samples myself and luckily they came up really clean. Instant hots are garbage. Even the expensive ones are not popular for people in the know. Sometimes they are necessary. Your best bet would be to buy a new oil boiler. I would try and locate a oil tank in your basement, probably unlikely. Then I would put one above ground and use that. The price of natural gas will be going up in the years to come. It is I believe 51% undervalued right now. That shale is a lie. That will never take off. The deposits are much small than expected, there is also going to be a big back lash against fracking. Not sure this is the best forum for your questions.
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Old 12-24-2011, 03:07 PM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,901 posts, read 4,120,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paintdrying View Post
Your oil tank is under ground? I hope it did not leak. You could be looking at a big big bill for the clean up and disposal. Which will not be covered by insurance. I paid some guy to come dig my tank up. I was able to submit soil samples myself and luckily they came up really clean. Instant hots are garbage.
In NYC? Where in NYC did you have an underground tank?

Btw, what is "instant hot"?

Quote:
The price of natural gas will be going up in the years to come. It is I believe 51% undervalued right now. That shale is a lie. That will never take off. The deposits are much small than expected, there is also going to be a big back lash against fracking. Not sure this is the best forum for your questions.
Please expand.

Why is "shale a lie"? Why proof do you have re the deposits?

If shale oil is feasible, why not gas?

Let's say 'fracking', as it is presently executed, is indeed a problem, some other way will be determined to get the gas. The only question is, at what cost point?

Re fracking, why the backlash? Hasn't that already started?
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