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Old 01-28-2012, 02:12 PM
 
172 posts, read 325,843 times
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From what I have seen, it seems like there are three different kinds of neighborhoods in NYC. First you have super-urban places like Manhattan (which I personally find depressing), then you have places like Brooklyn or Bronx, which are very working-class but have a lot of charm, and then you have the rich suburbs, which are like their own world unto themselves. I think the rich suburbs are most unique. Ever since urban decay started 40 or so years ago, I think most of the "traditional" NYC people (especially Jews) who give NYC most of its character fled to these places. And I might have a rather broad definition of "Greater" NYC. Everything from New Rochelle to Great Neck to Stamford CT to Princeton to places like New Providence, Avenel, Pompton Lakes, Pluckemin, Bedminster, Bridgewater, maybe even Lambertville in NJ could be included in this description.
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Old 01-28-2012, 02:17 PM
 
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I grew up mostly in the 80s (not in New York). So what I knew about New York is crime. So for me, NYC culture is about any neighborhood you're likely to get mugged or stabbed just walking down the street. Not that I frequent any such areas.
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Old 01-28-2012, 03:53 PM
 
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Would anyone here agree that Bronx and Brooklyn almost have a rural feel in parts of them? And the design of modern Manhattan is based on the design of modern Chicago, not the other way around?
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Old 01-28-2012, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Helsinki, Finland
5,473 posts, read 9,189,733 times
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Bronx rural feel? No, maybe suburban in some areas and some White-Tailed Deer in Pelham Bay Park.
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Old 01-28-2012, 04:27 PM
 
400 posts, read 831,994 times
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The question is ambiguous.

Ill just say this, QUeens is in my opinion, the only place where you will find a balance of everything. Nothing too extreme in any end of the spectrum.

Poor, rich, white, black, immigrant, patriot, urban, suburban.

QUeens center mall and the area along QUeens boulevard is the greatest representation of New York City, minus the elite rich white liberal nonsense or the super full blown ghetto project bs mentality.
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Old 01-30-2012, 03:30 AM
 
951 posts, read 1,168,811 times
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combination of manhattan and tight knit blocks in the outer boroughs from all different ethnic groups. then mix them and see how they interact with one another. that's nyc's culture.
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Old 01-30-2012, 04:52 AM
 
Location: BK All Day
4,480 posts, read 8,315,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicoz View Post
Would anyone here agree that Bronx and Brooklyn almost have a rural feel in parts of them?
Have you ever been to an actual rural area?
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Old 01-30-2012, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,129 posts, read 26,407,309 times
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Nothing in NYC even VAGUELY approaches "RURAL."
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Old 01-30-2012, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,231 posts, read 3,473,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicoz View Post
Would anyone here agree that Bronx and Brooklyn almost have a rural feel in parts of them? And the design of modern Manhattan is based on the design of modern Chicago, not the other way around?
I don't know which one of your statements is the most laughable, but both of them are factually not true. The least dense parts of Brooklyn and the Bronx would still be considered high density suburbs, much less rural areas. The grid system for city planning was nothing new, since we got it from Greeks and Romans. Cities of New Haven and Philadelphia were already using the grid when Chicago was nothing more than swamps and forests along the lake. Manhattan's grid was proposed in 1797 and adopted in 1811. Keep in mind that by 1833 Chicago had a whopping population of 200 (no, I didn't miss any zeros).
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Old 01-30-2012, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Astoria, Queens, you know the scene
750 posts, read 2,128,070 times
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Roosevelt Ave in Queens is the real New York to me.
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