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Old 01-29-2012, 07:15 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Originally Posted by tabaluga View Post
Could I ask all interested in discussing historical issues to either start a new thread or stick to the topic, please? Thank you.
I was interested in hearing answers to your question too. Hopefully someone will have a serious response soon.
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Old 01-29-2012, 03:30 PM
 
Location: England
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I found this useful thread on another forum:

Are there schools that run a British school curriculum
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Old 01-30-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tabaluga View Post
Hi,

Another school-neighborhood dilemma for you. We are considering relocating to NYC (or even NJ) this summer with two children aged 8 and 3, and naturally we are a bit anxious about the elder's transition into the American schooling system. We are fortunate to be able to school her at an established private school, where the curriculum I think is very challenging, and ideally we are looking for the same in the NYC area. Because of having some relatives in the area, we are considering Greenpoint in Brooklyn, where we are told are the best public schools in the borough for K-5 (PS31 and PS34), or perhaps a private (Catholic) school the costs were reasonable.

We were also wondering whether it would be of benefit to place her in grade 4, which would be more of a numerical continuation (she is in year 3 now), but that would also mean a year ahead of her American counterparts?

Are the American and British the curriculums vastly different at that stage? Should we be concerned? Or should be forget NYC altogether and concentrate on the suburbs (NJ) where the common opinion is that the schools are almost always much better.

I was wondering if there was anyone who has gone through this and could share their thoughts, please? All helpful replies will be much appreciated.
Would information on a middle/high school (public) offering the International Baccalaureate diploma be helpful to you? If so, check this out:

Baccalaureate School for Global Education, Q580, Borough of Queens , Zip Code 11106
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Old 01-30-2012, 11:16 PM
 
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It is my understanding that the schools in the UK are more advanced in their curriculum for the corresponding year in the US. Most schools here do not start foreign language until the students reach our "secondary" level at around age 11 or 12. Spanish, by far, is the most popular foreign language studied in US public schools. Few public schools in the area offer German any more, and French courses have declined considerably. Only certain private "prep" types of schools offer Latin. There are one or two public high schools that may offer Latin on a limited scope. You will also find that most American schools will be behind in mathematics, as well. The school year here is also shorter. Unfortunately, most public schools in the NYC school system, even the so-called "good" schools are rather lacking in comparison to their near-by suburban districts. Catholic schools can be selective in accepting and keeping their students, but their nonsectarian curriculum will be similar to the public schools. Each state sets the guidelines for the curricula. It is also really hard to get the school district to agree to having your child placed a year ahead. We have great universities in the US, but in general, our elementary and secondary schools are behind most of their European counterparts. You mentioned an opportunity to move to NJ. I would suggest looking into some of the better schools districts in NJ.
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Old 01-30-2012, 11:28 PM
 
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Also wanted to mention that the history or social studies curriculum in New York State in Grade 4 is basically local history. This would mean the history of New York, e.g. the Native Americans, the Dutch, Peter Stuyvesant. The following year, the students study American history focusing on the colonial period, the American Revolution, the industrial revolution, and the American Civli War. American history is revisited in 7th grade in more detail, I believe, and then again in greater detail in 11th grade in high school. This should be a bit different from what you are used to back home.

European history is tackled as part of World History in grade 10.

The other difference you may find is that there is more of an emphasis on American literature here, even at your children's ages. You will find that at the high school level, a good deal of standard British classical literature is only studied in the more advanced/honors English classes.

In NJ, the curricula is slightly different.


Of course, Harry Potter is universal

Last edited by Coney; 01-30-2012 at 11:47 PM..
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Old 01-31-2012, 03:06 PM
 
Location: England
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quennsgrl and Cobey thanks for your contributions.
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Old 02-04-2012, 07:19 PM
 
Location: NYC
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There are gifted and talented programs in the NYC public schools that require testing for enrollment. Here's some information. Basically, getting into one of these programs early on is the key to being on the right track for the best middle schools and high schools. You should become familiar with the process ASAP. I can't say whether they are on par with British schools but they're the about the best that's available in the NYC public school system.

* - Gifted and Talented - New York City Department of Education

These are some of the best middle schools:

NEST+M - About NEST+m | NEST+m

Mark Twain - Mark Twain I.S. 239 / Mark Twain I.S. 239

Christa McAuliffe - http://www.is187.com/pages/IS_187


Do you know about the Specialized High Schools?

http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/734BB461-5872-44A6-8A3E-4899164E5F4F/0/SHSAT_2011_HandbookFinal.pdf (broken link)
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