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Old 02-02-2012, 09:13 PM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,035,616 times
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I've lived in NYC and Chicago and work as an office manager for a law firm currently where I'm overworked, stressed out, and in general spend most days feeling trapped in what I'm doing. I've been thinking about changing careers constantly, especially as there have been several rounds of layoffs recently (thank God I've survived them). Each time one happens I pick up the slack and, frankly, I feel like I'm doing too much for what I'm being paid. I understand this is the nature of the market right now and I should just be happy to have a job. All I know is I'm not. I always thought about working as a stylist as it seems like a job that's more secure (you typically don't worry about layoffs, more like simply retaining clientele). It's obviously impossible to outsource. And it's something I've always had a natural talent for. I love fashion, art, and styling in general. I was looking into attending the Aveda Institute, kind of pricey but at this point I really don't care. I have a modest savings, and I know the cost of NYC life. The Institute tells me they would most likely place me into an apprenticeship as this is standard practice in the more upscale salons. I know there would be some struggle involved. I don't know what to do, and I don't want to make a decision I'll only wind up regretting. I'm so frustrated! Help!!!
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: No Sleep Til Brooklyn
1,413 posts, read 4,678,879 times
Reputation: 591
You may want to watch this doc on how the recession has affected the clients of an UES salon and its owner:
Watch The Full Program Online | Close To Home | FRONTLINE | PBS

My grandmother owned her own salon for decades through ups and downs and I think it's a great career. However, it is not recession-proof.
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Old 02-05-2012, 02:43 AM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,035,616 times
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I watched the entire video... very interesting, thank you for the link! I looked up Deborah Hair Designs. Appears she weathered the storm and is still in business, which is good to know. Thank you again!
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Old 02-05-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,899 posts, read 8,321,447 times
Reputation: 2021
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastBoundandDownChick View Post
I've lived in NYC and Chicago and work as an office manager for a law firm currently where I'm overworked, stressed out, and in general spend most days feeling trapped in what I'm doing. I've been thinking about changing careers constantly, especially as there have been several rounds of layoffs recently (thank God I've survived them). Each time one happens I pick up the slack and, frankly, I feel like I'm doing too much for what I'm being paid. I understand this is the nature of the market right now and I should just be happy to have a job. All I know is I'm not. I always thought about working as a stylist as it seems like a job that's more secure (you typically don't worry about layoffs, more like simply retaining clientele). It's obviously impossible to outsource. And it's something I've always had a natural talent for. I love fashion, art, and styling in general. I was looking into attending the Aveda Institute, kind of pricey but at this point I really don't care. I have a modest savings, and I know the cost of NYC life. The Institute tells me they would most likely place me into an apprenticeship as this is standard practice in the more upscale salons. I know there would be some struggle involved. I don't know what to do, and I don't want to make a decision I'll only wind up regretting. I'm so frustrated! Help!!!
Let me get this straight, a manager of a NYC law firm of stature earns $100K to $200K per annum and you want to dump that to become a hairdresser?

Are you for real?

OK, so its some little firm wayyy downtown or gosh in the outer boroughs, and its not six figures, but five, as in $50K.

The first thing you really need to do is accept that you do not have a 'career', you have a job.

While becoming a hairdresser, makeup artist and the like can, for the truly motivated, become a career, the reality is that for the overwhelming majority, hairdressing is just a J-O-B, and one w/o health insurance, paid vacation, paid days off, or any of the other benefits of a half way decent job.
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:34 AM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,035,616 times
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The firm I work for is a small firm, I make about 50K a year, 62K if you add in my benefits. Keep in mind that I work almost 70 hours per week for this pay (used to be less until the layoffs, now I am picking up slack for everyone that was let go). That's part of why I'm so unhappy. And while I know it is just a j-o-b for many, for many others it's a passion and something they love. I know many people who make a good living at it and work far fewer hours than I do. Why be so quick to judge? Also, many salons in fact DO offer benefit packages. I am not talking about working in some crap hole-in-the-wall establishment. I'm glad we cleared that up.
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Old 02-05-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Location: No Sleep Til Brooklyn
1,413 posts, read 4,678,879 times
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As much as I love Aveda (and the cheap cheap amazing treatments at the school), have you considered going someplace less expensive to see if you like the work and then doing advanced training w/ Aveda or another high-end brand later?

Without a bunch of school debt, you'll have more freedom to choose where and how much you work
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
1,194 posts, read 1,514,344 times
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Lol didnt you once say that nyc is a toilet for everyone except for the rich?
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Old 02-06-2012, 02:02 AM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,035,616 times
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I did say it was and I stand behind that comment still. But there's also the opportunity factor. It's a tradeoff. More chance to rise up, but a bigger struggle along the way.
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Old 02-06-2012, 06:15 AM
 
Location: BK All Day
4,480 posts, read 8,333,153 times
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Since my sister is a hair dresser I can see you have a lot of misconceptions about the job. She went to an Aveda institute to. Thought she lives in a different state. Are you prepared to work weekends? Because Saturday is usually the busiest day for a salon and everyone is usually required to be there. For her, school was 5 days a week 8:30-5. Do you like standing? You will be standing for 8 straight hours. There is very little sitting down time. She sits when she gives pedicures, which are beginning to hurt her back. Another thing is you don't just jump right into taking clients. You have to assist. The guy who cuts my hair here in the city assisted for 5 years before he started seeing your own clients. You are usually paid minimum wage to assist and make tips form shampooing. Not many people tip the shampoo girls. Also there is a high rate of carpeltunnel.
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Old 02-06-2012, 08:17 AM
 
5,740 posts, read 5,189,693 times
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I have a friend who was a Lawyer and even though she made good money and was good at it she wasn't happy. So after years of practicing she left, went to beauty school, and now works at a salon. She is newer there and doesn't make tons but she's happy and says it doesn't feel like work. she had to down grade her apartment, save a lot of money before doing this and budget more to do so but for her I know it was worth it. So if you have a passion for it and you want to find happiness doing something you love, I say go for it. If it's to make money, don't.
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