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Old 08-25-2009, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,058 posts, read 28,243,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riverdaleny View Post
New Jersey will never become NY'S 6th borough, its a state and jersey is not going to give up any of it
I hope I'm not going too far in speaking for anyone else, but I think we know this.
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Old 08-26-2009, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Bronx
13,189 posts, read 15,566,947 times
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to me lower westchester county is the 6th borough, I cant really say much for other places. Places like bergen county, fortlee, jersey city has a nyc feel but i would not consider that a 6th borough and south florida which has an extensive expatriates of jewish, italian, and puerto rican heritage who hail from nyc is not the 6th borough either. Anything out of state should not be considered the 6th borough.
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Old 08-26-2009, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,058 posts, read 28,243,709 times
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The whole idea of annexing some municipality as a 6th borough is kind of silly, anyway. Now, if some place like, say, Yonkers approached the city and asked to change its status from independent municipality to borough of the city...that would be entirely different.

For the historical record, at the time of consolidation (1898, when the city comprised of five boroughs was officially formed), there was a vote among the towns and townships to the east of Brooklyn. Three of them--Flushing, Jamaica and Newtown--voted in favor of joining up with the city. The Rockaway peninsula was added into the mix and voila: the borough of Queens was born! The towns that voted against joining the city became Nassau County. And that vote was very close. NYC could easily have had a sixth borough right from the start.
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:21 PM
 
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Yeah, it seems unlikely that any towns will be pursuing being the 6th borough. Rather, I think the question is about which area has the most New Yorker transplants or has similar qualities to NY. NJ is out of the question, the accent and look of the areas are totally different from NY. I would think Long Island and/or lower Westchester, nearby the city where us city slickers feel comfortable moving without being too far away from our beloved NYC.
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Old 08-26-2009, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Historic Downtown Jersey City
2,705 posts, read 6,789,493 times
Reputation: 1186
Quote:
Originally Posted by DITC View Post
You people are a bunch of lost puppys at the kennel that nobody has claimed.

Realize that proximity to Manhattan does not determine a borough. Newcomers, life does not revolve around Manhattan.

To all the clowns who think anything in Hudson County should be a borough instead of Staten Island, realize that Brooklynites moved to SI because it was part of NY. If SI was in New Jersey, they would have never moved there. Also, there is one dump inside city limits. Adding Hudson County to the mix would add a second, and would never happen. Why would anyone downgrade when you can upgrade and add scenic Westchester County and its bankroll of tax revenue, or Nassau County to get more beaches? With that said, there will be no sixth borough ever.

The tri state area is interesting because you have Manhattan, the rest of NY, NJ, and CT, which are all vastly different areas in a small space. These people usually congregate in Manhattan but live different lives in their respective places, although their neighborhoods may look similar to something else in the area. Realize that common ground is not in the appearance of the neighborhood, but it is by the people themselves. Back in the day, accents and traditions could vary from neighborhood to neighborhood. Now those boundaries have been blurred as people branch out more and culture is lost. But make no mistake, there are still local differences. Always celebrate differences in life instead of trying to unite everyone into one bland flavor.
WRONG. Don't you have any idea how many Brooklynites have moved from BK to SI, and then finally settle in NJ? It's the classic westward move in the NY metro area ... been happening since the 70's.
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Old 08-26-2009, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Historic Downtown Jersey City
2,705 posts, read 6,789,493 times
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I think many of you guys are going way overboard with the "it doesn't have a NYC feel" argument. Please define a NYC feel? And what do the conservative republicans in Staten Island and Bay Ridge have anything to do with the funky, edgy people in the East Village? Seriously. Enough is enough with the "NYC feel" ... NYC has many different "feels", which makes it a great city. If, hypothetically, Hudson County NJ was added (would never happen), then NYC would have another "feel" to add to it's existing plethora of "feels". LOL.

You are allowing arbitrary, man-made borders to justify an argument that NJ has an entirely different feel. It's your mind telling you "I know this isn't within NY borders, so I have a different feel!". Or, just blatant, blind pride that anything "in NJ" is "soooo much less great than NYC!"

I'm proud of being a NJ guy, more than you can imagine. But it is silly, for NYers, and NJians, to think that an invisible, man-made border can PREVENT cultures, ideas, and lifestyles from integrating and bouncing between the two states.

Just as many of my neighbors in Jersey City are from NYC as they are from NJ. It's about 50-50, it seems. I think that's cool, and provides an interesting mix of people. And you know what? Many of my NY neighbors feel that Downtown Jersey City has a Brooklyn vibe. OK. I think Jersey City has it's own vibe too, but I can see the Brooklyn resemblances.

And those of you who are voting for Nassau County, as 6th borough ... LOL?!! I thought most "real" NYCers frowned at suburbanites! Too funny.
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Old 08-26-2009, 05:16 PM
 
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Clearly you're not a native New Yorker or you would understand about the New York "feel". There's just something about native New Yorkers that I love. Doesn't mean better, just a certain something. I'm getting sick of NYC yet I dont want to move too far away from my New Yorkers. So yeah, it would be nice to settle in a nicer, quieter "6th borough" full of people who are from the city.
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Old 08-26-2009, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Orlando
259 posts, read 701,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passdoubt View Post
If you blindfolded somebody who'd never been across the river and dropped them off around Hamilton Park in Jersey City or Washington Street in Hoboken, they'd probably think they were in Manhattan or Brooklyn. Lots of attached rowhouses and brownstones. Active street life. Young yuppie folks about.

The same couldn't be said for Yonkers or anywhere in Nassau. Parts of Yonkers could pass for the Bronx-- the big boxy apartment buildings predominate. And Nassau looks like outer Queens of course, which is suburban-looking as well.

I guess it depends on what you think defines New York City... but as far as JC and Hoboken having some separate Jersey "vibe" which is different from NYC, I'm at a loss to what reasoning you're using to conclude that Greenwich Village is more culturally connected to Yonkers or Hempstead than it is to JC or Hoboken.

And if Manhattan really doesn't define NYC, then maybe we should be asking the opposite question: what parts of NYC should be given to Jersey? Maybe we give Manhattan below 96th Street, BK Heights, Park Slope, and Williamsburg over to NJ, 'cause they're not the "real" NYC anyway?
I agree with every bit of this post. What is the "feel" of NYC. Define it?
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Old 08-26-2009, 09:28 PM
 
Location: THE THRONE aka-New York City
3,012 posts, read 4,916,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delg23 View Post
I agree with every bit of this post. What is the "feel" of NYC. Define it?
That feeling you only get when u cross that george or that lincoln. U gotta be from here to understand it. Its definently a "where not in kansas anymore" type of feeling and u dont get that till u on the other side of the hudson. Even when i was a youngin, visiting my aunt who lived in jersey, i noticed how different jersey felt. Its not a bad or a good thing it is what it is though.
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Old 08-27-2009, 08:44 AM
 
1,867 posts, read 3,456,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by delg23 View Post
I agree with every bit of this post. What is the "feel" of NYC. Define it?
Again, it cannot be defined. Transplants will not understand until they have lived here at least a decade, if not longer, and actually associate with New Yorkers and not just transplants.

Sorry if this annoys you, but it is what it is, and I believe all native New Yorkers will agree with this.
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