U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-21-2018, 06:08 AM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,282,964 times
Reputation: 2834

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Those areas don't offer much in the way of performances from musicians, theatre, etc. All that is bigger in Northwestern Brooklyn. Northwestern Brooklyn has cinemas that show independent film. You don't have those in Flushing or Jackson Heights. You have major film festivals and theatre festivals in Northwestern Brooklyn, and a lot less of that in Central Queens.

So while it's inaccurate to portray Queens as a small town in Iowa, Brooklyn has more entertainment and cultural options. Actually Jackson Heights does not even have a full service gym with a swimming pool!
I usually disagree with NY writer but Brooklyn is MUCH more developed in terms of urban offerings. It's just a fact that fact and it's reflected in demand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-21-2018, 06:45 AM
 
Location: NY
1,183 posts, read 269,585 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlushingRepresenter View Post
What are the differences between Brooklyn and QUeens? They are the only two boroughs, IMO, that have alot of similarities while still maintaining their own distinct character. And we know that The Bronx, for the most part, is just an extension of Upper Manhattan

My question is what are some of the things they definitely share, what are some of the things they definitely do not share. People, places, feel etc.

For example: both have china towns, both have large caribbean populations, both have. Brooklyn has great subway service while QUeens has good highway/parkway/expressway service.

Please elaborate.

Queens has for the most part maintained an unbroken pattern of working class,family raising,religious distinction,
respect for education,level of low crime, single and some multifamily homes, and segregated neighborhoods.
Before anybody starts jumping on segregation please note that I am using this example in the contents in which
a family felt safe because of the cultural ,racial and religious commonalities amongst each other.
This was an accepted behavior ( can't point fingers ) and a way of life back then which proved
healthful to maintaining the integrity of home regardless of race,color or creed. It worked.
Queens also contains a running but minimally evasive transit system (the cancer that ruins neighborhoods)
A transit system that invites travel between low and high crime neighborhoods creates opportunity for the bad.
Queens for the most part provided travel between low crime and even lower crime neighborhoods.
Queens is the newer of the two tamed wild lands as Brooklyn worked the seaports centuries ago and Queens
provided passage for goods to and from the Long Island farms. A history of New York realty is an amazing read.
Brooklyn offers the same,but due to economy,immigration and crime the area had felt the impact more and it is
extremely obvious as areas within the confines of the neighborhoods have splintered. Some for better some for worse.
Queens was spared being peppered with the failure of high rise New York City Housing Projects.
There are still areas of Brooklyn that are untouchable and gated but that is pale in comparison to
the plethora of high rise apartment buildings and Housing Projects littering the Brooklyn landscape.
Cramming people atop of one another is not a good idea but that's debatable among the so called scholars.

Brooklyn is coming to Queens . No ifs ands or buts........
New York City politicians ,Realtors, Builders, LLC's , only care about one thing. It's all about the money $$$ as the geniuses
agree that white collar work generates more revenue for NY than blue collar so dump the overalls for the 3 piece suit.
This means transform the low rise commercial factories for low/ middle employment to high rise apartment buildings
for the much much higher income earners.This is evident in High Rise Construction surrounding Long Island City,Flushing
and Jamaica Queens as some examples. Where this part of town used to provide jobs for the skilled of vocation has now
been replaced by tall buildings to suit the needs of the software developer,banker,so on and so on.

Change is unavoidable, necessary and eventually (supposedly) beneficial.
However I find it toxic and detrimental to the fabrics that make up any healthy community.
It brings traffic,congestion and eventually crime and quality of life complaints.
Brooklyn and Queens have different identities. Both are travelling in different directions.
I just pray that with transformation some of the old time neighborhoods are left alone to
the folks who have kept them nice,clean , crime free and quiet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2018, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,155 posts, read 32,695,448 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Retired View Post
Queens has for the most part maintained an unbroken pattern of working class,family raising,religious distinction,
respect for education,level of low crime, single and some multifamily homes, and segregated neighborhoods.
Before anybody starts jumping on segregation please note that I am using this example in the contents in which
a family felt safe because of the cultural ,racial and religious commonalities amongst each other.
This was an accepted behavior ( can't point fingers ) and a way of life back then which proved
healthful to maintaining the integrity of home regardless of race,color or creed. It worked.
Queens also contains a running but minimally evasive transit system (the cancer that ruins neighborhoods)
A transit system that invites travel between low and high crime neighborhoods creates opportunity for the bad.
Queens for the most part provided travel between low crime and even lower crime neighborhoods.
Queens is the newer of the two tamed wild lands as Brooklyn worked the seaports centuries ago and Queens
provided passage for goods to and from the Long Island farms. A history of New York realty is an amazing read.
Brooklyn offers the same,but due to economy,immigration and crime the area had felt the impact more and it is
extremely obvious as areas within the confines of the neighborhoods have splintered. Some for better some for worse.
Queens was spared being peppered with the failure of high rise New York City Housing Projects.
There are still areas of Brooklyn that are untouchable and gated but that is pale in comparison to
the plethora of high rise apartment buildings and Housing Projects littering the Brooklyn landscape.
Cramming people atop of one another is not a good idea but that's debatable among the so called scholars.

Brooklyn is coming to Queens . No ifs ands or buts........
New York City politicians ,Realtors, Builders, LLC's , only care about one thing. It's all about the money $$$ as the geniuses
agree that white collar work generates more revenue for NY than blue collar so dump the overalls for the 3 piece suit.
This means transform the low rise commercial factories for low/ middle employment to high rise apartment buildings
for the much much higher income earners.This is evident in High Rise Construction surrounding Long Island City,Flushing
and Jamaica Queens as some examples. Where this part of town used to provide jobs for the skilled of vocation has now
been replaced by tall buildings to suit the needs of the software developer,banker,so on and so on.

Change is unavoidable, necessary and eventually (supposedly) beneficial.
However I find it toxic and detrimental to the fabrics that make up any healthy community.
It brings traffic,congestion and eventually crime and quality of life complaints.
Brooklyn and Queens have different identities. Both are travelling in different directions.
I just pray that with transformation some of the old time neighborhoods are left alone to
the folks who have kept them nice,clean , crime free and quiet.
Queens was spared because the Housing Authority dumped most of Queens NYCHA in the Rockaways! We have 25% of Queens NYCHA but only 5% of Queens land area, u do the math....
__________________
"The man who sleeps on the floor, can never fall out of bed." -Martin Lawrence

Forum TOS: http://www.city-data.com/forumtos.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2018, 08:03 AM
 
9,923 posts, read 7,687,681 times
Reputation: 4692
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
Queens was spared because the Housing Authority dumped most of Queens NYCHA in the Rockaways! We have 25% of Queens NYCHA but only 5% of Queens land area, u do the math....
Also LIC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2018, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,155 posts, read 32,695,448 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShirlMastic Beach View Post
Also LIC.
Well Queensbridge was one of the first NYCHAs ever, so LIC was the guinea pig
__________________
"The man who sleeps on the floor, can never fall out of bed." -Martin Lawrence

Forum TOS: http://www.city-data.com/forumtos.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2018, 02:58 PM
 
Location: NY
1,183 posts, read 269,585 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
Queens was spared because the Housing Authority dumped most of Queens NYCHA in the Rockaways! We have 25% of Queens NYCHA but only 5% of Queens land area, u do the math....


Thankyou for your observation.
The numbers are correct but please understand that at the time NYCHA reached a construction
fever pitch, the Rockaways, although part of Queens was nothing more than a barren strip of land
containing a very sparse community population, lacking in local amenities and geographically
isolated from the majority Queens population which resulted in minimal impact on surrounding
Queens communities with larger populations who happened to vote against NYCHA construction
defeating those smaller communities with a smaller voting power.


Numbers do matter on paper but reality shifts the outcome as in this example.
There exists a percentage difference between Queens and Brooklyn but the
impact proved more detrimental to Brooklyn than to Queens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2018, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,155 posts, read 32,695,448 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Retired View Post
Thankyou for your observation.
The numbers are correct but please understand that at the time NYCHA reached a construction
fever pitch, the Rockaways, although part of Queens was nothing more than a barren strip of land
containing a very sparse community population, lacking in local amenities and geographically
isolated from the majority Queens population which resulted in minimal impact on surrounding
Queens communities with larger populations who happened to vote against NYCHA construction
defeating those smaller communities with a smaller voting power.


Numbers do matter on paper but reality shifts the outcome as in this example.
There exists a percentage difference between Queens and Brooklyn but the
impact proved more detrimental to Brooklyn than to Queens.
No no my friend.

The first housing project in Rockaway as I understand it was built on land that was the former Rockaway airport (Arverne Houses, 1951).

After that, the next wave of housing was built on former slums (bungalows). These were Hammels Houses and Redfern Houses, 1955. Who lived in those bungalows that lacked winterization, you ask? People that the city put there! They didn't just put it there for the reasons you mentioned. Needle in the coffin was when the city put Edgemere Houses (1961) on the other vacant land that was formerly part of the old Rockaway airport. Then NYCHA started sending their worst cases out to Edgemere. Didn't mean to derail the thread, but wanted you to know the history.
__________________
"The man who sleeps on the floor, can never fall out of bed." -Martin Lawrence

Forum TOS: http://www.city-data.com/forumtos.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2018, 10:19 AM
 
497 posts, read 106,008 times
Reputation: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
No no my friend.

The first housing project in Rockaway as I understand it was built on land that was the former Rockaway airport (Arverne Houses, 1951).

After that, the next wave of housing was built on former slums (bungalows). These were Hammels Houses and Redfern Houses, 1955. Who lived in those bungalows that lacked winterization, you ask? People that the city put there! They didn't just put it there for the reasons you mentioned. Needle in the coffin was when the city put Edgemere Houses (1961) on the other vacant land that was formerly part of the old Rockaway airport. Then NYCHA started sending their worst cases out to Edgemere. Didn't mean to derail the thread, but wanted you to know the history.
I wonder if the NCPD is bothered by the presence of the Redfern houses
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2018, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,155 posts, read 32,695,448 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuildingLover View Post
I wonder if the NCPD is bothered by the presence of the Redfern houses
Bothered how?
__________________
"The man who sleeps on the floor, can never fall out of bed." -Martin Lawrence

Forum TOS: http://www.city-data.com/forumtos.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2018, 10:23 AM
 
497 posts, read 106,008 times
Reputation: 220
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
Bothered how?
Like if it creates crime issues that spill into Nassau County
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top