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Old 02-17-2012, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY born & raised!
2,593 posts, read 3,728,289 times
Reputation: 3497

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1. Jaywalking is a way of life here.
2. Most people move through the streets and trains like they had to be somewhere 10 minutes ago. (At least the natives anyway, the tourists are always stopping and looking up).
3. There's no shortage of events going on at any time around the city. Make sure you become familiar with the ones that interest you most. And a lot of them are free or cheap as well.
4. As long as you think of the city in the terms of a compass, you will never get lost. (I still use this to this day when going into parts I haven't been to). For instance the train you got off was heading north and your destination is east of the station, etc.
5. Beaches here suck big time. Despite all of this coastline, the only good beaches are in New Jersey or on Long Island. Don't ask me why.
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Old 02-19-2012, 02:09 PM
 
18 posts, read 23,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missjanna74 View Post
5. Beaches here suck big time. Despite all of this coastline, the only good beaches are in New Jersey or on Long Island. Don't ask me why.
I currently live about 5 miles from a beach on the Gulf of Mexico. The water is always a lovely shade of chemical plant grey, sometimes with tar balls for flavor. Literally, you can step into water just a couple inches deep and not see your toes. I'm pretty sure you can't get much worse than that.

By the way, good call to the poster who recommended sun screen. Again, something I wouldn't have thought of. Summers here are usually too hot to go outside for an extended period of time (100+ degrees).

I do cook a lot for myself now, but I don't see the kinds of meals I cook being expensive anywhere (pitas, pasta, rice, beans, vegetables). I'm *hoping* for an apartment with some kitchen space, but if not I think I'd be fine putting a cutting board on the table, or coffee table, or wherever I have a flat surface lol.

I have noticed that there's good accessibility to less expensive prepared food in NYC. Compared to where I am now (outside of Houston) there's really not much like that aside from breakfast foods (doughnuts, breakfast tacos).

I do live in an apartment now, at least, so I'm used to limited space and neighbor noise. But I do expect to deal with more noise and less space. I'm already getting rid of everything extra I can to prepare for it.
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Old 02-19-2012, 02:20 PM
 
709 posts, read 898,341 times
Reputation: 389
Fresh Direct grocery delivery service is great; there is no reason to schlep groceries around. Use Seamless Web for ordering prepared food for delivery. Join a gym if you are young and want to meet people rather than hanging out in bars. It's better to have one of the cheaper (i.e. samller or on a lower floor) apartments in a nicer building (i.e. be a little fish in a nicer pond) than a high floor apartment in a less expensive building. Ask if your building is 80/20 or completely market rate. Never stop in the middle of the sidewalk. Learn how to use the bus system in addition to the subway. Get rid of at least 50% of your stuff before you move. Don't expect to have a car and park it on the street; if you can't afford a garage, ditch the car and sign up for zipcar. Otherwise you will have to move your car all the time to comply with street sweeping rules. Make sure you building has laundry facilities somewhere in it.
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Old 02-19-2012, 02:27 PM
 
709 posts, read 898,341 times
Reputation: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagwagon113 View Post
I have to disagree with spending too much on an umbrella. I used to only buy cheap umbrellas and they broke all the time. I finally ponied up for a decent umbrella and it is still going strong. It's always funny seeing the umbrella graveyard after a rain storm.
I got a Lil Windy umbrella at a conference I went to and it works very well. Make sure you get an umbrella that has vents for wind to keep it from blowing inside out. Definitely invest in good rainboots and a raincoat too.

DO NOT CARRY A GOLF UMBRELLA in the city unless you are trying to be a jerk.

Oh, and even if you are wearing rain boots, wear dark pants/tights on days when it is raining because you will get backspatter on you.
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Old 02-19-2012, 02:44 PM
 
18 posts, read 23,963 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by daisyLI View Post
It's better to have one of the cheaper (i.e. samller or on a lower floor) apartments in a nicer building (i.e. be a little fish in a nicer pond) than a high floor apartment in a less expensive building.
It's cheaper to have a lower floor? If so, this is great--I have a Dachshund and have been worrying about how the stairs will affect his back. (Not that he has any back problems, but the breed is predisposed to them.) I'm totally down with having a place on a lower floor.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:19 AM
 
1 posts, read 802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
If you're waiting for a subway train and one pulls in packed like sardines except for one empty car that just has a single occupant, do not get in that car.
Squeeze in one of the crowded ones.

Hi, first Id like to say this forum is very helpful.
Id like to know what are people talking about when they mention empty train cars... its not the first time I hear this.

Thanks in advance
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:40 AM
 
1,119 posts, read 2,172,893 times
Reputation: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matiello View Post
Hi, first Id like to say this forum is very helpful.
Id like to know what are people talking about when they mention empty train cars... its not the first time I hear this.

Thanks in advance
That is urban legend, thing of the past. With Bloomberg's leadership and transplants support, that won't happen again.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Plandome, NY
7,048 posts, read 7,624,544 times
Reputation: 3889
Quote:
Originally Posted by candiceb View Post
It's cheaper to have a lower floor? If so, this is great--I have a Dachshund and have been worrying about how the stairs will affect his back. (Not that he has any back problems, but the breed is predisposed to them.) I'm totally down with having a place on a lower floor.
yes, its generally cheaper to live in a lower floor. There is even a bigger "discount" to live on the ground floor of sub ground floor......as long as you don't mind the nyc cats....i mean rats
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Plandome, NY
7,048 posts, read 7,624,544 times
Reputation: 3889
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill83 View Post
That is urban legend, thing of the past. With Bloomberg's leadership and transplants support, that won't happen again.
its not a urban legand. it means a bum stunk up the subway car. even if YOU don' smell it, the smells latches on you. I am gifted with low sense of smell but i don't want to smell like a bum at work
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Old 03-27-2013, 11:44 AM
 
2,853 posts, read 6,255,281 times
Reputation: 1636
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirtiger View Post
its not a urban legand. it means a bum stunk up the subway car. even if YOU don' smell it, the smells latches on you. I am gifted with low sense of smell but i don't want to smell like a bum at work

I think Bill was just being facetious with his response and taking a dig at Bloomberg.

But yes - obviously most people want a seat on the train. Hence, an empty car = something wrong = usually stench.
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