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Old 04-16-2012, 02:54 PM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,899 posts, read 8,326,382 times
Reputation: 2021

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jad2k View Post
Good god almighty...my point is that those places sell the clothes, not give them away. I know many, MANY people in NYC who can more than afford to by new clothes but choose to shop secondhand at the Goodwill and other similar stores. There is actually a [sub] culture of people that are thrift shoppers.
Sooooo what???

You have a narrow experience and knowledge that you are applying to a broad spectrum! You are allowing your prejudice toward a small percentage subset of people who frequent these charities. Personally, I have NEVER seen a Hipster in the Salvation Army store in my neighborhood. My GF and I donate multiple times per year; and, even we have perused the store looking for interesting items (not clothes).

In my area, the majority in the stores are poor immigants and poor white working/class senior citizens.

The point is the Salvation Army and Goodwill help far more people across the city and nation than the charities you suggest.

They also help FAR more truly poor people with clothes for their children, old people, and immigrants. They maintain a chain of stores in poor neighborhoods serving the poor, and an infrastructure to support the stores, they hire the handicap and other hard to place workers. They also do other good works other than simply selling clothes!

As a result, they have a cost overhead, which is partially supported by the incredibly modest charge for the items in their stores!

Sooo, if you want to donate your clothes to an organization which helps the greatest number of people, and equally interesting, people who actually live in your neighborhood and are your neighbors, you cannot do better than either the Salvation Army and/or Goodwill.

Rather than knowing and understanding the workings and real good of the organizations, you appear focused upon the behavior of a few IDIOTS unassociated with the organizations. Many of whom are not idiots, but have a PHILOSPHY behind their actions!!!

Yes, they can afford to buy new, but many choose not to. Their reasoning simply put is to question the sense in supporting the manufacture of NEW, which consumes the Earth's resources unecessarily, when one could buy USED and consume none of the Earth's resources. An intelligent and reasonable point of view.

So, affording the monetary cost is not the issue. Affording the waste that purchasing new represents. Now, if their are some who have turned this life philosphy into a fashion statement, WONDERFUL, as the purpose is still served!

I have no love for Hipster dweebs, but I suspect too much time spent in their locales, Williamsburg, Greenpoitn and the LES, has narrowed your vision thru a hipster prisim.

Quote:
If you want to donate your clothes to an organization that wont "sell" them, you can chose something like Dress for Success or better yet, go straight to a needy and give to a shelter. My friend worked at a battered women's shelter and would regularly accept clothing donations from her friends for the women that lived in the shelter.
You can choose to do that, but your comments and reasoning attempting to lessen the works of the Salvation Army and/or Goodwill speaks more to the narrow vision of your prisim, than actual reality.

Simply because they don't charge DOES NOT mean they serve a better or more charitable purpose. It simply means that their operations are supported 100% through monetary donations, while the Salvation Army/Goodwill support their operations with a lower percentage of monetary donations.

Charities are evaluated by the efficient use of their donated funds, percentage of donations actually used for charitable works vs the percentage used for administration staff salaries and administration. If you are serious about seeing that your donations find their maximum potential, I suggest you do a little homework and start here:

Wise Giving Guide and Charity Evaluations - U.S. BBB

This an organization which evaluates charitable organizations, rating and reporting on their workings.

Let us all give wisely.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:35 PM
 
2,350 posts, read 3,337,323 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcoltrane View Post
Sooooo what???

You have a narrow experience and knowledge that you are applying to a broad spectrum! You are allowing your prejudice toward a small percentage subset of people who frequent these charities. Personally, I have NEVER seen a Hipster in the Salvation Army store in my neighborhood. My GF and I donate multiple times per year; and, even we have perused the store looking for interesting items (not clothes).

In my area, the majority in the stores are poor immigants and poor white working/class senior citizens.

The point is the Salvation Army and Goodwill help far more people across the city and nation than the charities you suggest.

They also help FAR more truly poor people with clothes for their children, old people, and immigrants. They maintain a chain of stores in poor neighborhoods serving the poor, and an infrastructure to support the stores, they hire the handicap and other hard to place workers. They also do other good works other than simply selling clothes!

As a result, they have a cost overhead, which is partially supported by the incredibly modest charge for the items in their stores!

Sooo, if you want to donate your clothes to an organization which helps the greatest number of people, and equally interesting, people who actually live in your neighborhood and are your neighbors, you cannot do better than either the Salvation Army and/or Goodwill.

Rather than knowing and understanding the workings and real good of the organizations, you appear focused upon the behavior of a few IDIOTS unassociated with the organizations. Many of whom are not idiots, but have a PHILOSPHY behind their actions!!!

Yes, they can afford to buy new, but many choose not to. Their reasoning simply put is to question the sense in supporting the manufacture of NEW, which consumes the Earth's resources unecessarily, when one could buy USED and consume none of the Earth's resources. An intelligent and reasonable point of view.

So, affording the monetary cost is not the issue. Affording the waste that purchasing new represents. Now, if their are some who have turned this life philosphy into a fashion statement, WONDERFUL, as the purpose is still served!

I have no love for Hipster dweebs, but I suspect too much time spent in their locales, Williamsburg, Greenpoitn and the LES, has narrowed your vision thru a hipster prisim.



You can choose to do that, but your comments and reasoning attempting to lessen the works of the Salvation Army and/or Goodwill speaks more to the narrow vision of your prisim, than actual reality.

Simply because they don't charge DOES NOT mean they serve a better or more charitable purpose. It simply means that their operations are supported 100% through monetary donations, while the Salvation Army/Goodwill support their operations with a lower percentage of monetary donations.

Charities are evaluated by the efficient use of their donated funds, percentage of donations actually used for charitable works vs the percentage used for administration staff salaries and administration. If you are serious about seeing that your donations find their maximum potential, I suggest you do a little homework and start here:

Wise Giving Guide and Charity Evaluations - U.S. BBB

This an organization which evaluates charitable organizations, rating and reporting on their workings.

Let us all give wisely.
Are you done with the soap box...I think you win the City Data award for "likes to argue for argument's sake"?

1) I've seen many a hipster at second hand stores and that's usually when I'm shopping there too and save your hipster insults, I'm not a "hipster"
2) Price wise, clothing at the Goodwill/Salvation army isn't really cheaper than the low cost retail stores like Conway. Hell, it's probably on par with a good H&M clearance sale.
3) Um, you do realize that my first suggestion was to donate to the Salvation Army and Goodwill, right?
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:43 PM
 
10,647 posts, read 20,799,935 times
Reputation: 8187
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcoltrane View Post
The reason you don't see them in NYC, is that they are NOT what they state and/or appear.

They are total misleading ripoffs. They collect the 'donated' clothes, sort them and ship them to third world countries for PROFIT!

In plain words, they SELL them for no good, but their own.
"The reason you don't see them in NYC is that they are NOT what they state and/or appear."

What kind of twisted logic is this?

The reason OP and, I guess, you, have not seen the clothing bins in NYC is because you didn't know where to look, not because they are not there. I know of at least 4 locations with clothing drop boxes in Queens just off the top of my head. The issue with whether the drop boxes serve a non-profit or for-profit company has nothing to do with whether anyone has seen them or not.

Also, not everyone cares whether the clothing is going to a non-profit or not. I suspect many people just would like to give the clothing a second life. If the donation goes to someone who sells the clothes, then at least the clothing will be worn by someone again.

Maybe the people who collect the clothing donations make money on it. So what. At least the clothes don't just go in the trash and make the landfills more crowded.
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