U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-20-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,685 posts, read 27,895,432 times
Reputation: 7177

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
For the record the NYC metro area accent is not divided by ethnic group, borough, or neighborhood. It's SOCIOECONOMIC!

South Brooklyn, the East Bronx, East Queens, Staten Island have heavy stereotypical NYC accent and they are all largely "middle class". Same goes for parts of Jersey, L.I., and the Hudson Valley (Even to the fringes of the metro: central NJ, CT). Among the wealthy the accent is less pronounced and among those of the lowest incomes include the addition of significant NY area Hip Hop terminology.
Many wealthy people in the area relocated from somewhere other than NYC, which would explain why some don't have the accent. Others hire voice coaches to help them lose the accent.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-20-2012, 09:11 PM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,627,154 times
Reputation: 708
Italian, Irish, Jews and Hispanics DO NOT speak differently in the same neighborhoods. Go to Bay Ridge and it doesn't matter what ethnic group the person is from, if they attended school in the neighborhood they will have the same accent.

The ethnic misconception comes from the socioeconomic segregation that exist in NYC. The fact that most Blacks for example live in poor neighborhoods of the city.

The divide is ECONOMIC. Take a New Yorker from Gramercy Park (Rich), Throgs Neck (Middle), and Brownsville (poor) and they will sound a bit different but take born and raised Italians, Puerto Ricans, or even Syrians from say Bay Ridge and they will sound the same.

This video defines the stereotypical NY accent. The NYC area middle class accent:


**** Brooklyn People Say - YouTube

NYC metro area is divided economically.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2012, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,808 posts, read 17,410,399 times
Reputation: 7515
Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
Italian, Irish, Jews and Hispanics DO NOT speak differently in the same neighborhoods. Go to Bay Ridge and it doesn't matter what ethnic group the person is from, if they attended school in the neighborhood they will have the same accent.

The ethnic misconception comes from the socioeconomic segregation that exist in NYC. The fact that most Blacks for example live in poor neighborhoods of the city.

The divide is ECONOMIC. Take a New Yorker from Gramercy Park (Rich), Throgs Neck (Middle), and Brownsville (poor) and they will sound a bit different but take born and raised Italians, Puerto Ricans, or even Syrians from say Bay Ridge and they will sound the same.

This video defines the stereotypical NY accent. The NYC area middle class accent:


**** Brooklyn People Say - YouTube

NYC metro area is divided economically.
Some what true and agree. This is what I was saying is that its also who your around ethnically, socially and economically. An italian guy living in brownsville will most likely sound like a black guy and use extensive AAVE terms and ques. A Dominican living around italians will sound like an italian nyc accent, and a yemeni living in a puerto rican hood will have a nuyorican accent. While a wealthy AA born raised and living in the uws amogst upper class ivy league educated jews and wasps will most likely speak in an upper class fashion of a nyc accent.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 01:06 PM
 
46 posts, read 38,936 times
Reputation: 34
Why is this so surprising?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2012, 01:08 PM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,238,640 times
Reputation: 3603
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
To this day, there are native New Yorkers, early 20s and up from what I've seen, that still have THE New York accent (doesn't matter from which borough), even if faint. Then there are some people who have spent their entire lives in one of the boroughs for whom it's difficult to tell they are from NY, unless they tell you.

However, I have seen it "thin out" a lot more in Westchester and in SW Connecticut, though it exists there too. I don't see it thinning much in North Jersey.

Mind you, it is my favorite of the US accents, but what separates who speaks with it and who doesn't, when someone is tri-state area NY born and bred?
It is more based on "class" than location.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: New York
420 posts, read 422,558 times
Reputation: 388
Accents are a funny thing. For example my father carries a new york accent and was born and raised upstate (syracuse). My cousin on the other hand, born and raised in flushing, barely has one at all.

Some people are just predisposed to speaking with an accent - they just pick it up quicker as children.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2012, 02:09 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,743 times
Reputation: 10
Default why some native NYers have no NY accent

because everyone under the age of 30 sounds like Molly Ringwald, a person many of them have probably never heard of but whose accent shaped those of all subsequent generations. a sickening hybrid of Valley Girl and sculptress from Big Sur, all "o"s are pronounced like the o in "bone", but far more dragged out, while most other long vowels are shortened to sound more artistic; each "L" is lingered over and caressed with pretentious zeal; "e"s can turn into "a"s, as in "spacial" [for "special"]; "like" is used as a comma or a synonym of "said" and occurs roughly five times every two sentences. Terribly precious, takes a rilly long time to, like, get to the point, and signals the speaker's inaccurately inflated self-image. they must pick it up from television and movies and those damn-fool kardashians, but it's turning honestly cheap-sounding Long Island girls into hideous little phonies.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2012, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,503 posts, read 17,199,837 times
Reputation: 2043
This is the authentic New York/Brooklyn accent.


A real Italian Brooklyn accent - YouTube

everything else is fake.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2012, 03:14 PM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,067,308 times
Reputation: 3383
if you're from nyc and you don't have some form of ny accent,
something must be wrong with you; you're from another state
or you just never come outside lol. there are different accents,
depending on your culture tho. even upper class anglo-saxon
manhattanites who speak proper english sound like real nyers.
they just sound kind of british sometimes.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Bensonhurst
31 posts, read 57,064 times
Reputation: 35
The accent is alive and well in Staten Island...I think the younger Staten Islanders have some of the strongest accents in the city, actually. I'm born and raised in SI, BUT, I barely have a trace of an accent due to taking acting classes where speech and diction were emphasized. I often hear "you don't sound like you're from NYC!" Having said that, my accents absolutely comes out if I'm talking to other NYers with an accent or if I'm angry.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top