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View Poll Results: Is the rent situation in NYC just part of a bubble or cycle, or is it permanent?
Yes, its a bubble that's bound to burst or drop significantly. 9 16.07%
Yes, but it will only drop in some places, or a little overall. 11 19.64%
No, they're here to stay and will only change very little. 19 33.93%
No, they can only get higher. 17 30.36%
Voters: 56. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-09-2012, 08:30 AM
 
2,503 posts, read 3,519,513 times
Reputation: 1906

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nyc77 View Post
"So tell me...is your argument going to be: "If all the poor people leave NYC, who will flip burgers, who will be cashiers, who will shine your shoes, who will do the dirty jobs you would never do, etc.?

Guess what? No matter how you cut it, there will ALWAYS be someone willing to do all those jobs mentioned and more despite the minimal pay. I guarantee you that. Even if they have to commute 2 hours, I bet you people will still do it. So using that as an excuses is moot."
Maybe the jobs can go back to the teens and college students like when I was growing up.
Can you imagine a movie like Fast Times at Ridgemont high being filmed today? You couldnt do it becasue it be a fiction movie becasue there are no teens working those jobs now.[/quote]

Teens are ideal for those kinds of jobs.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Crown Heights
965 posts, read 2,105,764 times
Reputation: 518
Quote:
Originally Posted by hilltopjay View Post
Ok, ummmmm.... you didn't answer my question but I understand why you couldn't answer it. Its a tough one.
Which question do I answer, who do I think I am? Am I the Mayor? Is my argument going to be who will flip the burgers? Yeah those were all real tough questions to answer.

My argument is this, forget about the people flipping burgers and all the extremely poor, or "the scum of the earth" as you call them. Lets talk about the people who make between say 35k to 55k, or the immigrants who come here to open up businesses and get a start. Those are some of the most productive people in the city and keep the city going, yet they struggle the most with cost of living issues.

While the upper class tends to be corralled into certain economic sectors, the working class not only diversifies the demographic but also the economy of the city, not to mention they are also important for tax revenues. You really expect these people to drive in 2 hours away to do those jobs, and not have incentives to move to other metropolitain areas, as they already are now? They are far more affected by this than the poor, in fact they are the ones who are leaving now. Most of the "scum" you refer to, tend to stay put because they have social nets while its mostly middle class people who get priced out. The point is, everyone plays a role, upper class, middle class and even the "scum of the earth"; they all play a role. You don't seem very analytical, yet you're quick to jump to conclusions.
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Old 05-09-2012, 11:22 AM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,280,911 times
Reputation: 2834
There was a small article recently in the WSJ about rising rents.
It quoted a senior exec at a REIT which owns residential apt buildings in NYC. He basically said that the vacancy rate is inching up a bit as a result of the rising rents but that's not a problem at all.

The vacancy rate in NYC is so low that landlords would rather have a higher vacancy rate with higher rents then the opposite.

With increasing urbanization, strong internal migration into NYC, and the willingness to split rental costs (roommates) there's just a constant upward pressure on rents.
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Old 05-09-2012, 11:51 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,062,796 times
Reputation: 3383
if people want to pay top dollar
to live like cats, that's there
problem. it does not make sense
to me tho.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Newark, NJ/BK
1,271 posts, read 2,174,059 times
Reputation: 662
For all those people who say "if you don't like the high rents, move", do you know how much it costs to move?!
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:31 PM
 
2,503 posts, read 3,519,513 times
Reputation: 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by njnyckid View Post
For all those people who say "if you don't like the high rents, move", do you know how much it costs to move?!
And do you know how much it cost to stay? Pick your poison!
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Old 05-11-2012, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
157 posts, read 347,486 times
Reputation: 71
Black population surges in East New York as it falls across the borough and city * - NY Daily News

Interesting article about why many people (blacks mainly) are moving to ENY and Brownsville.
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Old 05-11-2012, 01:51 PM
 
2,503 posts, read 3,519,513 times
Reputation: 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by JAGED View Post
Black population surges in East New York as it falls across the borough and city * - NY Daily News

Interesting article about why many people (blacks mainly) are moving to ENY and Brownsville.
The people in the article are right...they should move out of state or down south if NY is too expensive.
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:04 PM
 
1,567 posts, read 2,690,960 times
Reputation: 1262
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
There was a small article recently in the WSJ about rising rents.
It quoted a senior exec at a REIT which owns residential apt buildings in NYC. He basically said that the vacancy rate is inching up a bit as a result of the rising rents but that's not a problem at all.

The vacancy rate in NYC is so low that landlords would rather have a higher vacancy rate with higher rents then the opposite.

With increasing urbanization, strong internal migration into NYC, and the willingness to split rental costs (roommates) there's just a constant upward pressure on rents.

if people werent paying it,they wouldnt be getting it
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Old 05-11-2012, 02:22 PM
 
2,503 posts, read 3,519,513 times
Reputation: 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by bxlefty23 View Post
if people werent paying it,they wouldnt be getting it
Exactly!!!!!
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