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Old 06-26-2013, 01:17 PM
 
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Have you checked the demographic breakdown of the specialized high schools?
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Old 06-26-2013, 01:35 PM
bg7
 
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Originally Posted by leoliu View Post
I no longer believe in the stereotype that asians in NYC are better school performers after my own research... there are good, average, and poor students just like in any other groups.

The second part of your sentence is not in conflict with the first part of your sentence, although you apparently think so. You are talking about a population. There will be good, middling, and poor students in that population. However, the asian student population as a whole in NYC schools performs higher than the next highest scoring (whites).
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Old 06-26-2013, 01:50 PM
bg7
 
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The top 5 high schools in NYC as ranked on school digger by test scores are Stuy, Bronx Sci, Staten island tech, Erasmus and Townsend. All MAJORITY asian, except for SIT which is 30% asian. Note that asians are by number the smallest minority in the city school system based on the four category system of black, white, asian and hispanic, and yet those schools are majority asian.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
The second part of your sentence is not in conflict with the first part of your sentence, although you apparently think so. You are talking about a population. There will be good, middling, and poor students in that population. However, the asian student population as a whole in NYC schools performs higher than the next highest scoring (whites).

The asian population in america represents a selected group of asians, therefore conclusions drawn by comparing it with other groups from more diverse social-economic background should stay within america but will not apply globally

I know from my own experience that back in asia there are large proportions of poor performing students with little or no motivation in school that is utterly comparable to the general american students here.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:03 PM
 
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But the point is to compare immigrant populations in NYC and how they perform relative to each other.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:06 PM
bg7
 
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Originally Posted by leoliu View Post
The asian population in america represents a selected group of asians, therefore conclusions drawn by comparing it with other groups from more diverse social-economic background should stay within america but will not apply globally

I know from my own experience that back in asia there are large proportions of poor performing students with little or no motivation in school that is utterly comparable to the general american students here.
Yes, we are talking about NYC schools. Who is drawing conclusions about the global asian population?

The conclusion clearly is community cultural practices here are paying off. Asians in NYC schools have on average a higher chance of being free-lunch eligible than their white counterparts, yet they still outperform them as a population skewering the simple income-school performance correlation shown when populations are generalized.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Forest_Hills_Daddy View Post
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But the point is to compare immigrant populations in NYC and how they perform relative to each other.
It would be a fairer comparison if the "generation" factor is considered. The majority of the asian students in NYC have parents born outside america, therefore when you compare them to the white/black students, you need to sample these students with foreign born parents as well, not to blanket them in the general american white/black groups.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
Yes, we are talking about NYC schools. Who is drawing conclusions about the global asian population?
It is added information to avoid misleading generalization, which happens often.
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Old 06-26-2013, 02:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by leoliu View Post
It would be a fairer comparison if the "generation" factor is considered. The majority of the asian students in NYC have parents born outside america, therefore when you compare them to the white/black students, you need to sample these students with foreign born parents as well, not to blanket them in the general american white/black groups.
But they DO outperform other children with foreign born parents from other immigrant groups in NYC. That is how they become the #1 demographic in most specialized high schools.
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Old 06-26-2013, 03:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Forest_Hills_Daddy View Post
But they DO outperform other children with foreign born parents from other immigrant groups in NYC. That is how they become the #1 demographic in most specialized high schools.
I was thinking that if you have 1000 asian kids and 100 white kids with immigrant (foreign born) parents. Say half of both groups (500 and 50 for each) are selected into a specialized school which has 1000 students in total, with 50% asians + 40% whites + 10% else.

If you count them separately, the admission rates for both asian and white students with foreign born parents are similar. However, if you mix the white immigrant students into the entire white student body (50 immigrant white students + 350 local whites) and divide them by the total white student population in NYC, the admission rate for the immigrant white group will be much lower due to the large number of non-immigrant students.
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