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Old 04-27-2012, 08:50 PM
 
3 posts, read 21,464 times
Reputation: 11

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Hi,

I'm planning to move and have an interview scheduled for tomorrow to pick out an apartment. My new landlord (LL) has requested a notarized letter of tenancy from my current landlord. My current LL asked me to write it up and he'd sign it and have it notarized at his job. I called him tonight and he said it's done but will give it to me tomorrow night, which is after my interview. I don't have a lease and live month to month.

My question is this: if he refuses to give me that letter, is there anything I can do legally? I really want to take the new apartment, but if my new LL HAS to have the letter and my current LL keeps stalling, is there anything I can do?

My current LL isn't a slumlord per se, but he's slippery. Every time you need something it takes weeks for him to do it (one of the reasons I'm moving).
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Old 04-27-2012, 09:26 PM
 
3 posts, read 21,464 times
Reputation: 11
Anyone?
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Old 04-27-2012, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,147 posts, read 26,435,766 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
My new landlord (LL) has requested a notarized letter of tenancy from my current landlord.
Tell your new landlord to STUFF IT and find another place to live not owned by an *******.
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Old 04-27-2012, 11:18 PM
 
3 posts, read 21,464 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
Tell your new landlord to STUFF IT and find another place to live not owned by an *******.
Are you suggesting that my new LL doesn't have the right to ask for a letter of reference? I think the only reason they asked is because I don't have a signed lease to show. It seems fair.
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Old 04-28-2012, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,147 posts, read 26,435,766 times
Reputation: 9029
He has the right to ask for a wheel of prime gouda cheese or even weekly sex of his tenants if he desires. He should have no expectation of getting it.


I have lived in several apartments in 4 states and never once was I asked for a notarized letter from a former landlord. Typical is NAME and ADDRESS and PHONE.

Quote:
My question is this: if he refuses to give me that letter, is there anything I can do legally? I really want to take the new apartment, but if my new LL HAS to have the letter and my current LL keeps stalling, is there anything I can do?
If things are as you say new landlord absolutely wants something the old landlord absolutely won't provide, then there is NOTHING you can legallys do other than to wash your hands of the apartment...or grovel and beg.

The reason your old landlord is dragging his feet is the reason notarized recommendations are not common, except possibly for classsy co-ops...they are a pain in the ass for all involved.
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
9,832 posts, read 21,502,982 times
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I don't think what the new landlord is asking for is unreasonable considering the OP had no lease. Although IMO proof of on time rent payments and a character reference from someone else non family should suffice. I don't see the big deal in getting something notarized. Its very simple actually. The new ll just wants it notarized to ensure its the landlord signing it not a fake...
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:47 AM
 
2,503 posts, read 3,521,577 times
Reputation: 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronx Bourne View Post
Are you suggesting that my new LL doesn't have the right to ask for a letter of reference? I think the only reason they asked is because I don't have a signed lease to show. It seems fair.
Don't listen to KK. He hates landlords with a passion so his opinion is bias. He mag have been evicted 1 too many times for him to have such hatred towards landlords, so just ignore him. You are right, its reasonable for the new LL to request a notorized letter from your current LL since you don't have a lease.
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Old 04-28-2012, 10:04 AM
 
Location: NYC
25 posts, read 46,118 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronx Bourne View Post
Are you suggesting that my new LL doesn't have the right to ask for a letter of reference? I think the only reason they asked is because I don't have a signed lease to show. It seems fair.
The LL has a perfect right.

Your only problem, apparently, is a matter of timing, correct?

If you need the letter for the interview/viewing, then simply call ahead and advise that you will not have the letter by the interview date, but believe you will have by X date, and ask how they would like to proceed.

It is that simple.

They will either re-schedule for a more convenient date and/or proceed as planned and allow you to provide the letter at a following date.

Not a big deal.

What is a big deal is the manner in which you handle the circumstance. I would think that demonstrating that you have a sense of PROPRIETY is what is most important.
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Old 04-28-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: NYC
25 posts, read 46,118 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
He has the right to ask for a wheel of prime gouda cheese or even weekly sex of his tenants if he desires. He should have no expectation of getting it.


I have lived in several apartments in 4 states and never once was I asked for a notarized letter from a former landlord. Typical is NAME and ADDRESS and PHONE.


If things are as you say new landlord absolutely wants something the old landlord absolutely won't provide, then there is NOTHING you can legallys do other than to wash your hands of the apartment...or grovel and beg.

The reason your old landlord is dragging his feet is the reason notarized recommendations are not common, except possibly for classsy co-ops...they are a pain in the ass for all involved.

Sooo, your life experience defines the world for EVERYONE?!

Quote:
...except possibly for classsy co-ops...
Something you know so much about?? "Classy", I mean....

*****

How things are done in the world of professionalism and *Class*.

Ever hear of a management office with secretaries, assistants, managers, some of whom are Notary Publics? In places like this, a secretary types up a letter, has a manager sign it, and one of the (in house) Notaries stamp it and sign it. They then mail it or give it to a tenant.

In really efficient offices, they have 'form' letters.

Truly "classy" individual LLs w/o office staff, call their attorney's office and have them take care of such minor things; or, they will have their personal assistant pen/type a letter and have it dropped off at the attorny's office.

Btw, "class" defines a group of people whose way of life demands and is defined by a certain propriety of manners and correct behavior!!!

Such proprietariness becomes more valued and necessary, as the lower lifes prosper financially, in order to weed the pretenders. Such is the need for Letters of Tenancy.

Such ways and manners of propriety once were the way of proper society. Today, propriety is wholly foreign to the lower lifes, as the quoted poster above amptly demonstrates!

Given a choice, would you choose to live where he has, or where the OP has applied???

Of course, such a request and the ability to fulfil the request is not "Common", it is NOT intended to be. A Letter of Tenancy is intended to 'distinguish' from that which is, indeed, 'common', be it, in regard to tenancy, cleanliness, payment history, CHARACTER, or what have you.

Life is ALWAYS more than that defined by one's personal life experience. This reality applies most specifically to living in NYC! Is there anywhere on Earth that one can be exposed to a greater variety of living?

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Old 04-28-2012, 10:11 AM
 
2,343 posts, read 3,326,326 times
Reputation: 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
The reason your old landlord is dragging his feet is the reason notarized recommendations are not common, except possibly for classsy co-ops...they are a pain in the ass for all involved.
Getting something notarized is very easy...
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