U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-03-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: London, NYC, DC
1,068 posts, read 1,049,325 times
Reputation: 563

Advertisements

I fervently believe that rent control and stabilisation are driving gentrification. If 50% or more of all rental stock is essentially out the market, prices naturally drive up, particularly in desirable areas across Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn. If we got rid of those laws, would we not see at least a slight slowdown in the outward search for lower rents? Then again, one could argue that such movement is bringing in investment to other parts of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-03-2012, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
1,765 posts, read 4,125,830 times
Reputation: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
Yes they did, but it was dated.
Little had been done to change the home from when they bought in.
(A double wrinkle was that the black family that bought had WORKED for the white owners.)
What you talk about reminds me of a documentary PBS did on gentrification in East Columbus, OH. There were multiple gay couples who brought property in predominantly Black East Columbus. They brought run-down property on the cheap, and fixed it up. Enough gay couples brought property to change the political situation of the neighborhood. Soon, ordinances were passed requiring upkeep of property on the outside. Many residents faced eviction for failure to follow the ordinance. The community became entangled in an unfortunate fight of Black v. gay.

Very interesting documentary. It will be very interesting to see how the situation in Clybourne Park pans out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
33,693 posts, read 9,527,720 times
Reputation: 5473
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoking66 View Post
I fervently believe that rent control and stabilisation are driving gentrification. If 50% or more of all rental stock is essentially out the market, prices naturally drive up, particularly in desirable areas across Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn. If we got rid of those laws, would we not see at least a slight slowdown in the outward search for lower rents? Then again, one could argue that such movement is bringing in investment to other parts of the city.
You make it sound like you can't rent the other 50% of the housing stock...which isn't true, I have seen a number of rent stabilized apartments on the market to rent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2012, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
11,249 posts, read 10,927,881 times
Reputation: 4730
Quote:
I fervently believe that rent control and stabilisation are driving gentrification.
I don't agree at all. The same forces are in play in areas where there is not, nor has ever been rent controls.
I think a huge impact was made by population growth, the death of the industrial U.S.A., and the concentration of service industries into the ciities.
In other words, those with a future moved to the suburbs decades ago and now they want back in.

Those without the bucks got shuttled first INTO the inner cities and now OUT OF the inner cities. Like shuttlecocks in a badminton game.

And THOSE are the forces driving "gentrification." (In quotes becasue I hate the term.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2012, 09:14 PM
 
1,433 posts, read 1,263,590 times
Reputation: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt00926 View Post
Have you talked to actual residents that have lived through gentrification in their areas? Gentrification should not be equated with hipsters or yuppies carrying Starbucks and iPhones, gentrifiers come in all shapes and colors--not to mention since NYC has such a transient population, it's unavoidable that younger people are going to seek the more inexpensive areas to live in. I would be considered a gentrifier, I live in Washington Heights East of Broadway. I love the community and I have received nothing but warmth and respect.
There's nothing wrong with stable, law-abiding residents with good incomes moving into a neighborhood, but gentrification is a double edged sword. Sometimes the grittiness of a neighborhood is what helps to keep rents affordable, and commercial rents down to earth. So while the neighborhood before gentrification may be rough around the edges, it is bursting with opportunity for families to open unique businesses and some ethnically diverse restaurants. Gentrification might lower crime, which some see as a boon, but it also raises rents and this can wipe out neighborhood character that may have taken decades to achieve in a few short years.

Quote:
What I don't get is why people romanticize about NYC in the 70's and 80's. Those who grew up before and during that time know that stepping on crack vials and not being able to go down certain streets in your neighborhood is not what a sane person would call "character."
Well then call me crazy. I love the east village during the 80's. And I did experience the crack-vial-crunching-underfoot as I walked to school every morning. It had a dangerous element when it came to drugs and gangs, but everyone knew where the safe areas were,and there were some places you just didn't want to be once the sun went down. But there was sooooo much awesome, cool, unique shops and eatieries and lots of ethnic enclaves back in the day. They're almost all gone now, much to my dismay, and I have gentrification to thank.

But, I'm over it. I've accepted that change is normal, and I was lucky enough to enjoy the east village during the punk glory days. They are fond memories I wouldn't trade for the world. Now it's time to move on to something new.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2012, 10:21 PM
 
59 posts, read 47,733 times
Reputation: 124
Yes it is unavoidable

Hipsters and Yuppies can get annoying but it beats the hell out of crack heads and gun fights. Those are the only two options.

People always seem to want to recreate the old (irish, italian, secular jewish) ethnic hoods of yesteryear, but those people move to the burbs once they earn money.

So take your pick, yuppies/hipsters or thugs. Yuppies/Hipsters are the lesser of two evils.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2012, 09:37 AM
 
8,752 posts, read 9,515,752 times
Reputation: 4168
Kefir I don't know what the problem is with a white family (presumably you are saying it is a wealthier white family, however it could be any color) buying a house in an "up and coming" area (or whatever you want to call it.) What exactly is interesting about this? It was bought from a white family by a black family, and now by a white family from a black family...we should be concerned because? I believe the black family agrees to the transaction correct and are benefitting?

As for the gays moving into a black area....again..so what. Are only blacks supposed to live there? Gays can only live amongst themselves? They move in and gain political power...which is pretty much what happens when any group moves into an area...so what? Not really seeing the point of your comments.

Alkonost...just because the E Village isn't the dangerous/multiethnic/"interesting"/"cool" place anymore, doesn't mean other neighborhoods haven't become that. As you stated, neighborhoods change, so there is no doubt another NYC now fits that bill..so why be sad? If neighborhoods stayed static, that's a reason to be sad.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2012, 10:31 AM
 
Location: USA
6,657 posts, read 3,943,025 times
Reputation: 2275
i wonder who will be next to gentrify
the gentrifiers, or do they plan to
permanently settle the areas?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Harlem World
555 posts, read 544,219 times
Reputation: 300
The guy in 1A moved out..I am now the only minority in my building 8-(......Well no, guess you can count the gay middle eastern guy in 3A
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2012, 10:59 AM
 
347 posts, read 284,338 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by bronxguyanese View Post
opinions vary from resident to resident on how they feel about gentrification. From single educated locals to working class hero's, to old timers, single mothers and criminals have their take on gentrification. Why do people reminiscent about nyc from 90s, 80s and 70s? The city had character, it had a soul, the city had a vibe but that energy is now gone and had moved on. September 11 came and american culture took over and conquered much of the city. It seemed that nyc has become american. I wonder will america become nyc? I have spoke to residents about the issue and personally i'm mixed about gentrification. Like many gentrifiers i'm young 20 something, single no kids and hold a 4 year degree however without the debt like most transplants, but i'm a working class native who grew up in the hood and slwoly watching a hood turn into a nabe even though 4 of the most infamous housing pj's sits near areas that can be gentrified and probably will in due time. The new nyc lacks character and bland, too original like the clean suburbs. The only thing i can hope for is if gentrification gonna help improve our school system when transplanted begin to settle down and have kids.
yeap !!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:58 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top