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Old 06-08-2012, 08:07 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
127 posts, read 169,105 times
Reputation: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by likeminas View Post
So you dropped out of the MA program short of 5 credits?
You might as well should've finished it.

From an employer's perspective, a resume looks much better when you have a BA and an advanced degree rather than just BA with several extra classes.
No, I would have needed another 27 credit hours to get the MAcc degree. I had to take most of the post-bac classes anyways as foundation required classes before the advanced graduate level accounting classes. Had I kept going with it, I would have had 177 total credit hours under my belt. I was DONE with school after quitting my job and taking nothing but accounting classes full time for a year and a half. I've actually been more prosperous with my career having a bachelor's degree + CPA license than most of my friends who have MBA's.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:50 AM
 
27,245 posts, read 22,694,704 times
Reputation: 14266
the problem with most degrees as pertaining to the job market is we are a highly specialized world today.

most degrees today are worth about what the old high school diploma was.

its just your entrance pass to apply for the better jobs out there as it acts only as a filter.

we employ electrical engineers all the time right out of school.

the reality is they dont start with much money at all as their skill sets are still pretty worthless to us.

they first have to under go lots and lots of training in motor controls,switch gear and factory automation products before they are really of any value.

we could do that very same training with anyone without a degree and they would have the same chance to be successful.


the point is today general degrees are nothing more than a filter and the pay reflects the fact it will be quite some time before your much value to a firm.

you need to be focused and specialized before most degrees are worth more than a high school diploma was.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:00 AM
 
4 posts, read 6,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jester2138 View Post
Please, answer this! It's completely useless to talk about finance/health/computers when we have no idea if you're any good at them. You'll make a lot more money doing what you're good at than doing something because it's a profession that usually makes money.

A great professor will make more money than a bad accountant.
I enjoy school and math. I feel as if accounting would be a good choice for me. I have always wanted to move to a big city, have an office job, be able to support a family on the income, and continue to learn throughout my career. Sure math may not be my best subject, but I generally like obtaining new knowledge.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:51 PM
 
1,438 posts, read 1,276,282 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZAK606 View Post
I enjoy school and math. I feel as if accounting would be a good choice for me. I have always wanted to move to a big city, have an office job, be able to support a family on the income, and continue to learn throughout my career. Sure math may not be my best subject, but I generally like obtaining new knowledge.
So you like math but are not good at it? You'd be comfortable following a major path where you may not get decent grades? Several of my friends entered college planning to do pre-med and computer science. Most of them are NOT doctors or programmers! They had to switch paths because they were getting poor grades and at my college, when you get poor grades you get put on academic warning and face possible suspension! Needless to say, they reevaluated their strengths and weakness which for some meant a different major or more studying and less partying! I should also point out that many those that originally were on an engineering path but couldn't cut it, ended up switching majors to economics. Econ is very versatile as a degree and it has a fair amount of numbers and statistical modeling to appeal to someone that likes numbers/math. Lots of the econ majors ended up on Wall Street (and yes, they still have jobs LOL!) Of the other ones that didn't major in economics, a lot of them went into our commerce school which is basically an undergraduate business program. All of my friends who did the business program ended up with spectacular job offers, with signing bonuses and the whole shebang, right out of college.
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Old 06-10-2012, 07:56 AM
 
Location: 20 years from now
3,682 posts, read 2,501,656 times
Reputation: 1933
Degrees sort of work with the trends. I think 10 or smore years ago when I was in college Computer Science degrees were just tailing off as the degrees to have until the market became oversaturated with them.

From the looks of it though, it seems like degrees in Software Engineering and IT appear to have their pick of the litter in NYC.

I'd be careful about going with what's indemand though...by the time you graduate the market may have changed by then.
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Old 06-11-2012, 01:08 AM
 
15,621 posts, read 9,322,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandlines View Post
One of the best degrees to get is computer science. Software development is growing leaps and bounds. The job quality and pay is fairly high.

The only problem is that it's not really meant for most people. If you're not very good at it, you'll be miserable.
These jobs are going overseas. Cybersecurity is a niche that will thrive here.
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:18 AM
 
1,438 posts, read 1,276,282 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandlines
one of the best degrees to get is computer science. Software development is growing leaps and bounds. The job quality and pay is fairly high.

The only problem is that it's not really meant for most people. If you're not very good at it, you'll be miserable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bideshi View Post
these jobs are going overseas. Cybersecurity is a niche that will thrive here.
I don't think that's the case with Cali and/or NY based tech and internet companies, particularly the newer (start-up-ish) ones.
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Old 06-11-2012, 11:38 AM
 
Location: NYC by week; ATL by weekend
674 posts, read 553,079 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by wisnowbird View Post
No, I would have needed another 27 credit hours to get the MAcc degree. I had to take most of the post-bac classes anyways as foundation required classes before the advanced graduate level accounting classes. Had I kept going with it, I would have had 177 total credit hours under my belt. I was DONE with school after quitting my job and taking nothing but accounting classes full time for a year and a half. I've actually been more prosperous with my career having a bachelor's degree + CPA license than most of my friends who have MBA's.
I can totally agree with that. I also have B.A., CPA and another certification. When you get technical, they want sopme experience. MBA is meaningless once certified
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:38 PM
 
2,821 posts, read 2,098,572 times
Reputation: 1970
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
I can totally agree with that. I also have B.A., CPA and another certification. When you get technical, they want sopme experience. MBA is meaningless once certified
If you were a HR recruiter, and saw two candiates.

1) BS in accounting plus extra accounting classes, 2yrs auditng experience, CPA license.

2) MBA in accounting, 2 yrs auditing experience, CPA license.


Which one do you think a recruiter will chose?
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:42 PM
 
1,438 posts, read 1,276,282 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
I can totally agree with that. I also have B.A., CPA and another certification. When you get technical, they want sopme experience. MBA is meaningless once certified
Well, it's not just tech jobs. That would apply to most jobs. Specific experience is *always* highest on the list when evaluating a candidate. Of course, that only really applies when you are past the entry level stage. For the OP, he/she wants the best degree to get him/her in the door.
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