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Old 08-07-2012, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Is there anyway we can create a timeline of the gentrification process in NYC by neighborhood.

The purpose of this thread is not to discuss the merits (or lack thereof) of gentrification, which has been discussed ad nauseum in this forum.

Where and when did it start? Where is it now? Where is it going?
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Old 08-07-2012, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
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Well we can start with the easiest one which is Williamsburg, and gentrification started happening there in the late 90's - early 2000s. To be honest I'm not sure when Park Slope started, either around the same time, or mid-90s. I think a lot can be attributed to Giuliani and his effects on NYPD. So most gentrified neighborhoods really started either mid '90s or late 90s - early 2000s.
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Old 08-07-2012, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
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Started with SOHO and the Upper West Side in the early 80's.Then NOHO,LES,East Village,Chelsea.Then the push into Brooklyn.

The gentrification push seems to be sputtering right now.It seems to have lost momentum and is showing signs of fraying around the edges in neighborhoods that started to get on the merry go round just before the economic collapse.It is stalled out in Bushwick,Bed Stuy,Harlem and The South Bronx.Not sure whether it will wither and shrink back or if it will get on track again.Could go either way.

It may well all end with the end of Bloomberg's reign.The next mayor may not be a gentrification champion.There needs to be a champion greasing all the wheels ,pulling all the levers and pushing all the buttons for the real estate industry.

The first phase of the gentrification era was natural and organic,led from below.The last phases were completely manipulated and choreographed from above.Bloomberg was the puppet master and he will be gone soon.

Last edited by bluedog2; 08-07-2012 at 06:57 PM..
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Old 08-07-2012, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Bronx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
Well we can start with the easiest one which is Williamsburg, and gentrification started happening there in the late 90's - early 2000s. To be honest I'm not sure when Park Slope started, either around the same time, or mid-90s. I think a lot can be attributed to Giuliani and his effects on NYPD. So most gentrified neighborhoods really started either mid '90s or late 90s - early 2000s.
Wrong the easiest one is probably in the east village which probably started much more earlier than Williamsburg. I also want to add Morningside Heights which helped propel gentrification uptown.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:48 PM
 
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I recently came upon a guide book on where to live in the NYC area published by the New York Times in 1985. It was FASCINATING, and reveals a lot about this topic.

As far as I can piece together, there were two distinct Brooklyn gentrifications. There was the gentrification of the brownstone core--Park Slope, Boerum Hill/Carroll Gardens/Cobble Hill, Fort Greene, Clinton Hill--which was started in the 70s by people commonly called brownstoners. They were always something apart from Manhattan, with their own vaguely hippie-ish ethos.

Then you had the gentrification of lower Manhattan: Village (60s--what Jane Jacobs called "unslumming"), Soho, East Village, LES. The spirit of this was very different: it was driven by people who wanted to live near what they saw as an edgy artistic scene, as opposed to the brownstoners who wanted to raise families in authentically urban neighborhoods in old houses. As early as the 80s, it crossed the river into Williamsburg, if the Times is to be believed; this book included interviews of artists who were already complaining about rising rent. Then Greenpoint. Amazingly the Times in 1985 found a lawyer who'd bought a house in Greenpoint already, and cautioned that the neighborhood didn't have any place to get brunch...yet.

My favorite part of this book was a quote from an old-timer in Carroll Gardens complaining about the people moving in from...Ohio. Reminded me of this forum!

Obviously this is overly simple--people live where it makes sense for them so there was plenty of overlap, but that's the general idea.

Then I'd say right now we're in another big wave, which is too big to make sense of except to say that it's more homogenous than past waves, and probably bigger.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:50 PM
 
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i think it's just a circle around manhattan. Now it's LIC and astoria that's in the proces
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazee View Post
i think it's just a circle around manhattan. Now it's LIC and astoria that's in the proces
I just hope the Bronx is somewhere in those gentrification plans. Tired of seeing "hood" people being the predominate demographic in the Bronx.
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Bronx
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Originally Posted by hilltopjay View Post
I just hope the Bronx is somewhere in those gentrification plans. Tired of seeing "hood" people being the predominate demographic in the Bronx.
Norwood would never see the light of gentrification buddy so keep dreaming!
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:28 PM
 
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Why out of all the places in the north Bronx you picked Norwood?
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:48 PM
 
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I was assuming the TS was asking about the current/recent gentrification. There have been various gentrifications throughout history, but I believe this latest one is different. This "latest" one has literally transformed NYC or at least Lower Manhattan, and midtown manhattan. It stopped being the "edgy", gritty place Manhattan was famous for, and is now a haven for Yuppies, Hipsters, the LGBT community. The LGBT community in particular grew to never before seen numbers in this last gentrification. When did this start? I would say in the mid 2000s when the first Gen Yers got out of college.
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