U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 10-21-2007, 10:29 PM
 
37 posts, read 4,044 times
Reputation: 13

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynTx View Post
Agree. Certain places/locales/states have more of a 'mystique' and socio-historical uniqueness than others (California, Hawaii, Texas, New York), and thus the natives often have more 'pride'.

Boy, I just repeated what you said, almost verbatim.
The architecture can be strikingly different from one region to the next reflecting the local history. They but heads from time to time when one leaves and enters another region. Chicago is another one with pride but they don't offend people with it, but often I've seen NYers get shot down when they go elsewhere. MWs don't seem to have that problem so much when they go away from home. They blend in in the West, West Coast, and all over the East and large southern cities such as Atlanta.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2007, 12:02 AM
 
67 posts, read 154,047 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingtoLeave View Post
I have to say, as a native Texan, this is one of the funniest posts I've ever read!

As a former NYer, got any advice for someone who's looking to move in the opposite direction?
Where in Texas are you coming from and what do you plan on doing in the city?

Take what I said with a grain of salt. In my opinion there are many things to love about the city, but I also see the problems as well. I am not a 'true believer' like I was the first 5-7 years, but that doesn't mean I wouldn't recommend the city to anyone.

I will say this. It's ideal if you are: Single, wealthy, and young.
Or: Single, idealistic and young
And, obviously, if you were pursuing a specific career that was centered here, it may be ideal (i.e. financial trading, theater, Publishing).

If all you want is a change including a diverse cultural setting, there are way better options around the country, IMHO.
New York City is no longer the city with exclusive rights to cultural diversity.

I don't know if you are from Houston, but Houston is increasingly becoming a VERY diverse city.

Last edited by BrooklynTx; 10-22-2007 at 12:14 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2007, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 89,533 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingtoLeave View Post
I have to say, as a native Texan, this is one of the funniest posts I've ever read!

As a former NYer, got any advice for someone who's looking to move in the opposite direction?
I think BrooklynTx had a good recommendation.

I actually had met quite a few Texans that had recently arrived or moved to NYC before I left. Most were students, a number were bartenders. They were a refreshing change going out to the local tavern and meeting them.

One from Houston, was a T/A in the University I attended now she is the Chair of the Dept. She is very sold on NY since she could stay in the academic community.

Another a music/actor/singer stayed a while (from Houston too) got frustrated since there are so many in the city there to do the same thing, decided to return to Houston. She did a farewell show.

Many from Tx, as from many places, want the actor/singer/artist career and find that probably so competitive they don't last. People from Ct and NJ are at an advantage, they can work a job and commute in for lessons and performances (amateur). People from far away, say further than Ohio, are really far from home. Half the time, those who are good in that field, might end up on Broadway in some capacity, but end up again in Las Vegas on the road as demand has shifted in many entertainment venues.

But as the other guy said, the key is if you're young and have a disposable income, you won't mind getting thru those years with the experiences NY can provide, no matter how cramped living conditions, phoniness, and false promises one would encounter. You'll still have time to move on.

Better to have a profession or seek one in NYC you can get in because it's a very tight place, up tight is more like it, gang and groupthink is the order. Often people who try to get commercial breaks and other acting gigs get little in NYC. They then travel out to L.A. and get somewhere much faster.

It all depends on your career status and your goals.

It just doesn't have the lifestyle for me, I needed swimming pools, jacuzzis, hot tubs, waterskiing, decent beaches, roomy condos or apts, the ability to control ones temperatures in a place with a thermostat, and to feel your getting your money's worth, and generally more uptodate facilities. You don't need a car, but after a while you'll miss one and then find how expensive it is to have one, highest insurance rates in the nation. Healthwise it's imo very unhealthy. It's the only coastal city in the US without a developed waterfront with any public access to speak of. Single women get murdered a lot, cops get killed a lot, and you'd really best be on your guard now. NY is just the ugliest and roughest town (I don't mean that necessarily peoplewise) I'd ever experienced but that's imo and that was the last 3 years. Prior to 9/11 it was a whole different place. The repercussions really didn't seep in until about 4 years ago, 2 years after the event.

I'll always want to visit but NEVER to live again. It's really all one thing and can get very boring.

NY, she's a big girl, but she just didn't have my shade of lipstick.

I find it sinister that NY as a state, city or otherwise, has never been able to sustain its population, keep people there, employed, contented and they've always, I mean for many generations now, ALWAYS been having to relocate or move somewhere else for opportunities and advancement.

Think about it it can't be too great, New Yorkers are a minority in NY, it's mostly immigrants, not Americans. But you'll have to see for yourself, you'll never rest until you do. NY is a lot about LUCK. Life in a roulette wheel, literally. And no it isn't a city that never sleeps, that was during Sinatra's young years before our time.

Last edited by StuyTownRefugee; 10-22-2007 at 02:26 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2007, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 89,533 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingtoLeave View Post
I have to say, as a native Texan, this is one of the funniest posts I've ever read!

As a former NYer, got any advice for someone who's looking to move in the opposite direction?
So was I on target at all? LOL. I think the social climate in Dallas is very different from Houston. I found Dallas to be very production and business oriented, not saying Houston is not business oriented too, but Dallas is not at all as overly preoccupied with others' business or as friendly as was being described in the person's post about Houston.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2007, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
1,526 posts, read 3,961,746 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by FormerNYer2 View Post
I'd agree. Which is why, considering many things but especially paying brokers high fees besides the normal fees to find or get you into an apartment, usually substandard by most American living standards, no garbage disposal, a w/d is a life changing event, (it was for America at large in the 1940s), no central a/c/heat, drippy air conditioners in new buildings, union shoddy workmanship, you pay ConEd for heat you cannot regulate, even living in Manhattan used to be a nightmare. 1 swimming pool for 8 million residents, of course only Manhattanites can have a NYC address, all these things people took for granted before living there. It's like a City/State with the fees that in a fiedom people had to pay during feudalism in Europe.

Hell must be defined as Landlord/tenant court in NYC. I can imagine.

You don't know a place until you live there, and NYC unless you're at least a millionnaire, a multimillionaire, or a billionaire NY just can't be enjoyed. Then those fly away all the time, leaving their real estate cut-up tenements rented for huge profits, control the media to get more people to sucker in. The absentee mayor himself is more in Fla himself via his private jet, comes back to check on his interests. That's what the rich do, they love it so much, they're usually elsewhere. Even in Manhattan they have little to nothing in their apts in terms of conveniences, modern facitlities, comforts, don't even come with blinds, shades, nothing but bare walls, hardly any closets, scared to death for you to have a dishwasher, let alone a w/d. It's rare to have those built in. Poorest plumbing and lighting I've ever seen. Those are for the very rich, but garbage disposals are outlawed. That's why there are so many laundries, cleaners, restaurants everywhere, the dwellings aren't set up for today's needs, cook but what do you do with the waste? Bathrooms like jail cells. Bath and a half are a rarity. 2 baths?, that's 1 million dollars, but can't promise they'll work. Design? You'll help build the place once you've rented.
In other cities the poor live better than the rich in NY. It's a whole different world. Don't you dare say nothing critical about it either, either the mob will come upon you (with lighted torches like in Marie Antoinette) or the king or dictator will issue a gag order decree, "how dare you to question the king's authority, Gothica). The current governor Spitzer ran on the concept that "democracy is coming to NY". He meant that statewide, the state govt is inbred, beyond nepotism, which gives the City its despotic character.

Yeah I'd say it's Medieval, Gothic. Other than hazards I'd like to know what they think they have in that place!

In California they have such islands and they call it Alcatraz, in NY they call it Manhattan.

But that's what made Woody Allen's movies so funny, and they're still in 3 Stooges mode in NY interwoven with Scorsese's "Gangs of NY". That's how things get un/done !! Trains creaking along nearly falling apart over 100 years old, high dollar tolls leading on and off the two lane hwys, to the hinterland. AHA !! We've got you trapped!!

To all intested, NY will teach a person a lot, above all living in and visiting a place are two different things, in NY the contrast will be the shrillest. Just like the accents. IF you miss it, you're better off just watching the shrill chaos on The View with all those Brooklyn big mouths; or Larry King, Trump's Frump, etc.

Bugs Bunny had your typical NY accent, smart alec, insulting, always trying to outsmart, and could disappear into thin air just like the rest of the varmints.

Absentee mayor....exCUSE me?? Not true by a long shot. And he is much less likely to be "bought," being as he's already a billionaire.

Yes, Manhattan is out of reach of most NY'ers now, but when it was in reach, it was all you described and more.

Coop living can be very luxe indeed, and if you're not a boro snob you can get one for a song.

Garbage disposals outlawed? My b/f has one in his section 8 apt in the Bx that was built in 1920.

It's really like complaining about the high cost of gasoline. Supply and demand. End of story.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2007, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
1,526 posts, read 3,961,746 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by FormerNYer2 View Post
I think BrooklynTx had a good recommendation.

I actually had met quite a few Texans that had recently arrived or moved to NYC before I left. Most were students, a number were bartenders. They were a refreshing change going out to the local tavern and meeting them.

One from Houston, was a T/A in the University I attended now she is the Chair of the Dept. She is very sold on NY since she could stay in the academic community.

Another a music/actor/singer stayed a while (from Houston too) got frustrated since there are so many in the city there to do the same thing, decided to return to Houston. She did a farewell show.

Many from Tx, as from many places, want the actor/singer/artist career and find that probably so competitive they don't last. People from Ct and NJ are at an advantage, they can work a job and commute in for lessons and performances (amateur). People from far away, say further than Ohio, are really far from home. Half the time, those who are good in that field, might end up on Broadway in some capacity, but end up again in Las Vegas on the road as demand has shifted in many entertainment venues.

But as the other guy said, the key is if you're young and have a disposable income, you won't mind getting thru those years with the experiences NY can provide, no matter how cramped living conditions, phoniness, and false promises one would encounter. You'll still have time to move on.

Better to have a profession or seek one in NYC you can get in because it's a very tight place, up tight is more like it, gang and groupthink is the order. Often people who try to get commercial breaks and other acting gigs get little in NYC. They then travel out to L.A. and get somewhere much faster.

It all depends on your career status and your goals.

It just doesn't have the lifestyle for me, I needed swimming pools, jacuzzis, hot tubs, waterskiing, decent beaches, roomy condos or apts, the ability to control ones temperatures in a place with a thermostat, and to feel your getting your money's worth, and generally more uptodate facilities. You don't need a car, but after a while you'll miss one and then find how expensive it is to have one, highest insurance rates in the nation. Healthwise it's imo very unhealthy. It's the only coastal city in the US without a developed waterfront with any public access to speak of. Single women get murdered a lot, cops get killed a lot, and you'd really best be on your guard now. NY is just the ugliest and roughest town (I don't mean that necessarily peoplewise) I'd ever experienced but that's imo and that was the last 3 years. Prior to 9/11 it was a whole different place. The repercussions really didn't seep in until about 4 years ago, 2 years after the event.

I'll always want to visit but NEVER to live again. It's really all one thing and can get very boring.

NY, she's a big girl, but she just didn't have my shade of lipstick.

I find it sinister that NY as a state, city or otherwise, has never been able to sustain its population, keep people there, employed, contented and they've always, I mean for many generations now, ALWAYS been having to relocate or move somewhere else for opportunities and advancement.

Think about it it can't be too great, New Yorkers are a minority in NY, it's mostly immigrants, not Americans. But you'll have to see for yourself, you'll never rest until you do. NY is a lot about LUCK. Life in a roulette wheel, literally. And no it isn't a city that never sleeps, that was during Sinatra's young years before our time.
Again, I think this post is just a tad misinformed.

No developed waterfront with any access to speak of? Um hmmm...

Women and cops getting murdered left and right? Just a tad exaggerated.

What about Malibu? Movie stars live there, but now a wildfire is destroying their multi million dollar oceanfront mansions. I don't care how many baths you have, if you lose your home....

Yes, a lot of young hopefuls come here, but this is nothing new. The arts are the most competitive industry of all, and you have to pay dues like nowhere else. That's why serious artists eschewed the bourgeois lifestyle and lived in Paris garrets which were not fashionable at the time. That's why NYC artists move to post-industrial areas. That's just one of the many tradeoffs you make ifyou want to survive and maybe thrive in your chosen creative field.

I don't think it's unfair that the wheat get separated out from the chaff. With all the millions with stars in their eyes, what makes them think they are all the next big thing? Some truly creative people never make it, and some with less talent do. Same in Hollywood.

You can be a writer, a musician, an artist anywhere.

And true, if you need the hot tub, jacuzzi, etc then NYC is probably not the place for you. But I can live very well without them. I've got plenty of amenities in my Bronx coop, and had quite a few in my Lower East Side Manhattan coop too. You just can't have everything in one place. Even the wealthy have their problems here.

However, I do agree with a lot of your points--it helps immensely if you have a viable profession that you can sustain in this very competitive city. And if you're an artist without a trust fund, it can be very rough going. I think the unemployment rate for actors in NYC is something like 99 percent. Lots of wannabes here, but hey, it can be fun to try to live the dream at least for a coupla years while you're young.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2007, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes + some
2,885 posts, read 222,367 times
Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynTx View Post
Personally, I prefer not to hear other's mundane conversations and self-righteous rants. But just call me passive aggressive. Maybe New Yorkers are experiencing collective displacement.


I can well understand that if you live there. But it's a novelty for those visiting.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2007, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes + some
2,885 posts, read 222,367 times
Reputation: 346
When I grew up in NY, I lived in tenements with bathtubs in the kitchen on the LES and absolutely loved it as I was at last on my own, single, and had life by the tail. Later, I would look at certain buildings and said, "Oh I'd love to live in that building because it was a little more upscale" than what I had had. Now that I am long gone, and have experienced living with space around me and occasionally come back to visit the city, I say, "Wow. All those tall buildings (the ones I dreamed of once having) with tiny windows. It's like little cells that people go home to."

Last edited by Lillietta; 10-27-2007 at 10:55 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2007, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
857 posts, read 3,266,803 times
Reputation: 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillietta View Post
When I grew up in NY, I lived in tenements with bathtubs in the kitchen on the LES and absolutely loved it as I was at last on my own, single, and had life by the tail. Later, I would look at certain buildings and said, "Oh I'd love to live in that building because it was a little more upscale" than what I had had. Now that I am long gone, and have experienced living with space around me and occasionally come back to visit the city, I say, "Wow. All those tall buildings (the ones I dreamed of once having) with tiny windows. It's like little cells that people go home to."
Growing up in Bklyn we lived in one of the three houses on my block that weren't attached. We were separated from our neighbors by an alleyway. The house was about 1500 SF with only 1 bathroom and I am from a family of eight. but, because it was bigger than most of the houses on that block and we didn't share walls with neighbors we thought it was plenty of space.
It amazes me now when I think back because I have 3,300 sf on an acre and sometimes I think about getting something bigger (Why? I don't know). I think that each generation becomes a little more spoiled than the previous generation. I criticize my son's generation for their sense of entitlement and feeling like they have to have it all and have it now. I guess that my parents' generation looks at us the same way.

Last edited by NorthmeetsSouth; 10-27-2007 at 02:06 PM.. Reason: spelling typo
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2007, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Queens
841 posts, read 3,125,690 times
Reputation: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillietta View Post
When I grew up in NY, I lived in tenements with bathtubs in the kitchen on the LES and absolutely loved it as I was at last on my own, single, and had life by the tail. Later, I would look at certain buildings and said, "Oh I'd love to live in that building because it was a little more upscale" than what I had had. Now that I am long gone, and have experienced living with space around me and occasionally come back to visit the city, I say, "Wow. All those tall buildings (the ones I dreamed of once having) with tiny windows. It's like little cells that people go home to."
Right now, I live in a tenement building with Kitchen and Bath in a separate room across the hall. Even though the rooms are small and there is barely enough room to sit on the toilet, it's great to be experiencing what generations before have been living.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top