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Old 07-19-2013, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
3,674 posts, read 5,850,725 times
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Well, one of the guys installing an A/C unit on the roof of my job was sent to the hospital with heat stroke.

So, yeah, it's dangerous.
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Old 07-19-2013, 10:23 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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In this kind of heat, you are okay if you don't move around a lot and drink lots of water. Forget heavy physical activity in the middle of the day. You will likely die. In hot weather places, much of the work is done early in the morning or late in the evening to avoid the middle of the day and the afternoon. The reason why a lot more people don't die is partially air conditioning, and partially because a lot of people have the good sense to take it easy in this kind of heat.
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Old 07-19-2013, 10:28 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 30to66at55 View Post
During the late 1800s and early 1900s it was very common for tenemant dwellers to camp out in parks for some relief from the heat. Remember they didnt even have fans.

To say these types of heat waves are not dangerous to eveyone may be true today. You can find relief from the heat somewhere...if even strolling around stores or going to a movie. Back in the day there was NO relief. The poor working man, who was in good health, suffered day in and day out, many died. Can you imagine working in a factory and then coming home to a stifling tenement.

Lets all thank Mr Fedders and Mr friedrich...they have saved more lives than Mr Bloomberg ever will.
Unfortunately NYC was overbuilt by FAR. All this concrete retains heat.
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Old 07-19-2013, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Helsinki, Finland
5,473 posts, read 9,189,733 times
Reputation: 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Unfortunately NYC was overbuilt by FAR. All this concrete retains heat.
And they just keep on building these futuristic megalomaniac developments. All vacant parcels which gives some additional oxygen and gathers a little flora and fauna are becoming a thing of the past.
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Old 07-20-2013, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,129 posts, read 26,407,309 times
Reputation: 9021
Quote:

Come on, people, if it's dangerous at 95, what will they say when it's
105?
The THI surpassed 105 this week and the actual temperature hit 100 in parts of NYC. It came with a smog alert.

It's dangerous and it kills.

The Daily News did NOT make up this headline:
Quote:


30 killed across the U.S. in
nationís record-breaking heatwave




The heat sent
temperatures soaring over 100 degrees in several cities, including a record 105
in Washington, St. Louis (106), and Indianapolis (104), buckled highways and
derailed a Washington-area train even as another round of summer storms
threatened.


Read more: 30 killed across the U.S. in nation
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Old 07-20-2013, 07:28 AM
 
4,783 posts, read 4,663,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astorian31 View Post
You do realize heat waves, on average, kill more than a thousand people a year in the US, more than hurricanes and tornados.

While heat waves may seem like nothing to you, probably because you've got a good job, and can afford to stay cool, they are dangerous. Especially to the poor, to the old, to children and to the ignorant.
^This. Maybe you don't realize it but that is why they offer up "cooling" areas for those people who cannot afford or do not have anyway to cool their homes.

Besides, I find the "snow" forecasts much more irritating than the summer ones. Jeez when they have a little bit of snow every five minutes there is an update and now they have them driving around the city giving you a second-by-second update. "Here is snow. And here is more snow."
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Old 07-21-2013, 01:17 PM
 
8,218 posts, read 8,495,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astorian31 View Post
You do realize heat waves, on average, kill more than a thousand people a year in the US, more than hurricanes and tornados. While heat waves may seem like nothing to you, probably because you've got a good job, and can afford to stay cool, they are dangerous. Especially to the poor, to the old, to children and to the ignorant.
But in that case, one should have the brains to either choose to avoid cities with heat waves, or know how to deal with them. A person shouldn't be dependent on the weather forecaster to act as nanny.
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Old 07-21-2013, 01:32 PM
 
4,135 posts, read 9,115,274 times
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Stop and think about one thing: How much of Manhattan is not concrete? If you eliminate Central Park, there is not a lot. The more land you pave over, the hotter it gets. Concrete, glass, steel -- all reflect heat. Much of NYC is a bit the same..... Makes me so glad I moved out of the area in the late 1960s and stayed away.

We hit the high 90s last week up here but it gets absorbed into the ground. Yes, the heat was sweltering due to humidity, but nowhere near the feel it is there. One rain storm and we dropped over 20 degrees in an our and a half... and it has not gone back up. It won't unless the jetstream goes berserk again... simply as we have lots of land to absorb the heat... not just concrete.

One other nice thing? We have our own areas to grow sustainable family gardens ( we have 4 acres, so if we wanted, it'd could be really substantial) and have our own well (and that waters the garden). While the well used to be the house water, now we are "on the county water". People also have generators for winter storms and power outs... either one, we have a lot better ability to take care of ourselves than in the city. 10 days w/out power in a bad snowstorm meant running a generator about 4X a day for enough time to pump the sump out for no flooding, which also ran the furnace ( I set heat up to 85) and cool the fridge.... No issues. I would not even think about trying a few days of blizzard in NYC or the past "heat wave".

FWIW, it still hasn't broken heat waves of the 1950s or 1930s // and cold has not broken those of the 1940s or 1880s. Those set records all over NY State still unbroken.
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Old 07-21-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Queens, NY
436 posts, read 409,812 times
Reputation: 210
Quit the act. Upstate NY isn't as utopian as you imply. This coming from a guy who's been around the state and goes to school in the heart of it.
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