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Thread summary:

Anchorage Alaska neighborhoods, safety and crime rates, suicide rates in northern regions, depressing atmosphere, little daylight, bad weather, neighborhood diversity

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Old 11-20-2007, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
1,737 posts, read 3,902,743 times
Reputation: 465
My intent has never been, and still isn't, to attack people. As someone born and raised in this city, I've seen this city change dramatically over the years. I've seen it come literally from the ashes and become revitalized, with development in places I never thought happen.

That's why I will never tell anyone not to buy (invest or live) in any neighborhood in this city. I very well know that neighborhoods are what they are. I do know very well that Harlem is still Harlem, and Bushwick is still Bushwick. I know that the area surrounding Tompkins, Marcy and Sumner Houses in Brooklyn is still Marcy, Tompkins and Sumner Houses (I grew up in Tompkins). But I am seeing people reside in those areas despite those neighborhoods being what they are; people who would have never stepped foot in those neighborhoods 15, 20 and 30 years ago, for various reasons.

My hopes are as follows: First, that longtime residents (many who have gone through hell in NY's worse days) get a piece of the pie in this city, whose real estate reaps longtime financial benefits. Yes, it's harder now, with skyrocketing prices. The game has changed, and that means more collective action with regard to buying property. For exemple, more than one or two people have to contribute to buying a house in this city. Or instead of buying a brownstone, an individual may have to settle for buying an apartment. Second, that economically distressed neighborhoods become as diverse as possible; diversity brings a lot of benefits and goes a long way to end segregation that has been too long a part of this city.

Like I said, I understand the realities of this city and its neighborhoods (growing up in an NYC PJ, I know very well!). And due to a lot of issues affecting this city (affordability, gentrification, quality of life, etc), there will always be heated discussions with different perspectives. I will be mindful of that, and will attempt to be more civil in the future. Peace.

(sorry for the long-winded response!).
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Old 11-20-2007, 10:09 AM
DAS
 
2,155 posts, read 3,413,644 times
Reputation: 806
Good points Scatman, Nooyowkur81 has made a statement about people having a field day if a positive statement about the Bronx or Harlem is made.

Whenever the Bronx or Harlem is mentioned it is mentioned in a way sometimes with statements of hope that people will be displaced, that sort of thing. It is almost like we are going back to the time when the early American settlers signed treaties that allowed them to peacefully live in an area where the Native Americans lived. The natives thought they wanted to live there and be a part of the community. The settlers had no intention of this, they wanted to displace the Natives.

There are hard working homeowners, people that own homes, coops and condos in these areas that have lived for years with renters of all incomes in these areas. All of these long time residents have been waiting for a brighter and better day. Now that day may be on the horizon as some point out on this forum. Do these people have a part in this?

I don't think that people understand that you, your parents and maybe even your grandparents can grow up in neighborhood and you know everyone. That this neighborhood is traditionally a low to middle income neighborhood. You could have grown up in some sort of low income housing, now you have a regular job, making that 45K that someone said is the average NYC salary and you are looking to buy an apt in your neighborhood, you have saved for this. Now you can't, because there are only million dollar ones available.

There are coops for 300-400k in Riverdale, Kingsbridge Heights, Woodlawn, good sections of Queens. Why are you skipping over these neighborhoods? Why the low income sections of Harlem, and the South bronx? Why aren't more coops,and condos or conversions going on for these people in the lower income areas. I guarantee you people can live without marble floors and granite counter tops.
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Old 11-20-2007, 10:22 AM
 
Location: No Sleep Til Brooklyn
1,413 posts, read 3,126,127 times
Reputation: 558
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
still i didnt get an answer to my previous question.....so i dont wanna hear anything from this point on when i give info about neighborhoods that i know about from previous personal experience. i wont comment on neighborhoods that i dont know about, but the ones i do know about i will speak up on and tell the truth. even around my way is the hood (some parts) and i make it know its the hood but i always say come and check it out for yourself at the end.
It seems like you are itching for a fight and folks just aren't interested.

I can only speak of my experience, but whenever anyone here asks about Washington Heights, there are a ton of posts from people who talk about how ghetto it is or how much crime there is or how noisy it is, but they don't live here! I have for four years. I tell my honest experience that I have never seen a crime committed here. I have never been a victim of a crime committed here. I live below, 181 - not in the "good" part and I don't have neighbors having bbqs in the streets or playing their stereos or hanging out of their windows in the summer. Does that mean it doesn't exist? No. But it does mean that there are many different experiences in neighborhoods across the city.

As I posted previously, I lived for nearly two years in Harlem - a woman alone. I had no problems with crime. Were the streets clean? No. Did the grocery store suck? Yes. Did the brothers on the street hassle me to try and get my number? Every day and it sucked.

I detest that whenever anyone posts a question about a neighborhood with a majority of poorer or working class people, the responses are knee-jerk, "Don't move there unless you want to get robbed." or "Only move there if you can deal with the strange ways of that particular group of brown people!" Do these negative posters live in the neighborhoods they regularly slam? I doubt it.

I've never lived in Bed-Stuy and although I spent an entire day walking the neighborhood to see if I might want to move there, I don't comment on it here in posts. It seemed fine to me (my Grandma lives near Oakland so I know ghetto), yet I haven't lived in Bed-Stuy so I don't post about what it is like to live there.

I am not a pollyanna. There is a prostitute who works one of my corners. I wish she didn't. But if she didn't, my rent would probably be higher. I went to a community meeting and I heard about drug dealing in nearby buildings. In fact, there used to be a dealer above me. But he was evicted and now the apartment is rented by a teacher and her family. It's not like when I used to live on St Marks in the East Village and had to ask the dealers on my stoop to move so that I could get into my building.

What bothers me the most is cultural xenophobia often thrown around this forum under the guise of safety concerns. Until the country addresses the issues of poverty and class instead of poverty and race, we will just keep running around in the same sad circle with everyone afraid of people who don't look like themselves.
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Old 11-20-2007, 10:32 AM
 
974 posts, read 2,335,872 times
Reputation: 465
SeventhFloor, I guess you are addressing me. Listen, I would not recommend some nenighborhoods to some people in NYC, like the Far Rockaway, as an example, is too far away, ugly, lots of crime and unfriendly people. LOL. But there are other areas that I think are ok, not perfect but ok. The thing is that this is a very expensive city, especially if you want to live in or closer to Manhattan. Sorry to dissapoint, but from my experience, and people I know who lives in Harlem, I have to say is an ok place to be. That doesn't necessary means that there is no crime, but I think people can manage to live there and never be a victim of crime. So some people come here asking for advise, I will certainly say no to Soundview, Far Rockaway, South jamaica, Morrisana, etc, but I have to tell them to consider Harlem or Wahington Heights, for example. There are only a few blocks I will tell people to avoid, especially at night, but not the whole neighborhood. I have to be honest.

Actually some of you on this forum think a Ghetto is a Ghetto and they all are the same. I don't see that.
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Old 11-20-2007, 10:44 AM
DAS
 
2,155 posts, read 3,413,644 times
Reputation: 806
Quote:
I will certainly say no to Soundview, Far Rockaway, South jamaica, Morrisana, etc,
See that just goes to show that is your opinion. I know people in all of these areas that think that Harlem and Washington Heights is too grimy and too rough according to them.

Also all of these areas have good sections with homeowners and parking. Also straight subway rides to Manhattan. You can walk right to the train. Why would someone feel safer in Harlem and Washington heights is it because there are million dollar condos there? Its the same thing in those areas schools suck, you may have to shop for groceries outside of your immediate area. Everyone in Harlem doesn't live near Fairway.

I'm not attacking I am pointing out differences of opinion. I'm superstitious so I don't brag about not being a crime victim. But I know what is going on around me and if it stopped my area would be higher in price also.
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Old 11-20-2007, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Atlantic Highlands NJ/Ponte Vedra FL/NYC
2,689 posts, read 32,112 times
Reputation: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsonDowns View Post
It seems like you are itching for a fight and folks just aren't interested.

I can only speak of my experience, but whenever anyone here asks about Washington Heights, there are a ton of posts from people who talk about how ghetto it is or how much crime there is or how noisy it is, but they don't live here! I have for four years. I tell my honest experience that I have never seen a crime committed here. I have never been a victim of a crime committed here.
if a tree falls in the forest and nobody is there to witness it does it make any noise when coming down?
Just because you haven't witnessed any crime doesn't mean that there is no crime. That area while not the worst area is a higher crime area. What that means is that there are more crimes committed there than other places.
I've witnessed crimes in so called low crime areas but that doesn't mean that those areas are crime ridden.
The difference between good areas and bad areas has a lot to do with perception, an example is that in "good" areas you don't see the loitering and aimless hanging around, you don't see the drug dealers out in the open, there are drugs in "good" areas but it isn't as blatant as it is in bad areas.
those loiterers give the perception of being up to no good.
The biggest difference between good areas and bad areas is levels of income and levels of education which translate directly into the quality of life. Even the most ardent supporters of places like mott have or e harlem have to admit that those areas are mostly low income and the people are not well educated. Low income/low education = low lifestyle which means higher crime and a more stressful daily existence. And that is why i would avoid living in a low income are if at all possible
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Old 11-20-2007, 11:08 AM
 
974 posts, read 2,335,872 times
Reputation: 465
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAS View Post
Also all of these areas have good sections with homeowners and parking. Also straight subway rides to Manhattan. You can walk right to the train. Why would someone feel safer in Harlem and Washington heights is it because there are million dollar condos there?
Well, yes Harlem does have those condos these days, but I even though it was an ok place even before the condos. Washington Heights does not have a lot, if any condos, but I still think is also an ok place to live. the schools, yes they can suck, I won't disagree, but for some people who don't care about schools, then they are ok hoods to live.

The other neighborhoods, I mention, besides crime, are too ugly and desolate for anybody to even consider living in them. Oh and yes these are my opinions. If people have bad opinions of Harlem, or good opinions about the neighborhoods I don't like, then they are welcome to say it. Just don't quote me and attack me for mine.
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Old 11-20-2007, 11:14 AM
DAS
 
2,155 posts, read 3,413,644 times
Reputation: 806
Those people will never say it because they would rather for us Manhattanites to just debate for days on end about our sections and stay as far away from their sections as possible.

They love that desolation and the cheaper prices. The good sections of those areas are very quiet most of the time and everyone looks out for their neighbors. People just don't have a lot of money over there. BTW they think Manhattan is ugly.

Quoting by the way is not used to attack. It was not started on the NY forum it was picked up by NYer's that read and post on other forums. It is just a way to reference what that poster is responding to.
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Old 11-20-2007, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 100 Precinct
9,670 posts, read 16,847,502 times
Reputation: 3395
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpsonDowns View Post
It seems like you are itching for a fight and folks just aren't interested.

I can only speak of my experience, but whenever anyone here asks about Washington Heights, there are a ton of posts from people who talk about how ghetto it is or how much crime there is or how noisy it is, but they don't live here! I have for four years. I tell my honest experience that I have never seen a crime committed here. I have never been a victim of a crime committed here. I live below, 181 - not in the "good" part and I don't have neighbors having bbqs in the streets or playing their stereos or hanging out of their windows in the summer. Does that mean it doesn't exist? No. But it does mean that there are many different experiences in neighborhoods across the city.

As I posted previously, I lived for nearly two years in Harlem - a woman alone. I had no problems with crime. Were the streets clean? No. Did the grocery store suck? Yes. Did the brothers on the street hassle me to try and get my number? Every day and it sucked.

I detest that whenever anyone posts a question about a neighborhood with a majority of poorer or working class people, the responses are knee-jerk, "Don't move there unless you want to get robbed." or "Only move there if you can deal with the strange ways of that particular group of brown people!" Do these negative posters live in the neighborhoods they regularly slam? I doubt it.

I've never lived in Bed-Stuy and although I spent an entire day walking the neighborhood to see if I might want to move there, I don't comment on it here in posts. It seemed fine to me (my Grandma lives near Oakland so I know ghetto), yet I haven't lived in Bed-Stuy so I don't post about what it is like to live there.

I am not a pollyanna. There is a prostitute who works one of my corners. I wish she didn't. But if she didn't, my rent would probably be higher. I went to a community meeting and I heard about drug dealing in nearby buildings. In fact, there used to be a dealer above me. But he was evicted and now the apartment is rented by a teacher and her family. It's not like when I used to live on St Marks in the East Village and had to ask the dealers on my stoop to move so that I could get into my building.

What bothers me the most is cultural xenophobia often thrown around this forum under the guise of safety concerns. Until the country addresses the issues of poverty and class instead of poverty and race, we will just keep running around in the same sad circle with everyone afraid of people who don't look like themselves.
i am not picking a fight i just asked a question.
your perception of washington heights and harlem is honest. thats what i wish people would do on here. you say you personally havent seen crime but at least u address the other issues. other people on this board dont address anything and just hype it up for what its not. thats what my problem is.
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Old 11-20-2007, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Confines of the 100 Precinct
9,670 posts, read 16,847,502 times
Reputation: 3395
Quote:
Originally Posted by scatman View Post
My intent has never been, and still isn't, to attack people. As someone born and raised in this city, I've seen this city change dramatically over the years. I've seen it come literally from the ashes and become revitalized, with development in places I never thought happen.

That's why I will never tell anyone not to buy (invest or live) in any neighborhood in this city. I very well know that neighborhoods are what they are. I do know very well that Harlem is still Harlem, and Bushwick is still Bushwick. I know that the area surrounding Tompkins, Marcy and Sumner Houses in Brooklyn is still Marcy, Tompkins and Sumner Houses (I grew up in Tompkins). But I am seeing people reside in those areas despite those neighborhoods being what they are; people who would have never stepped foot in those neighborhoods 15, 20 and 30 years ago, for various reasons.

My hopes are as follows: First, that longtime residents (many who have gone through hell in NY's worse days) get a piece of the pie in this city, whose real estate reaps longtime financial benefits. Yes, it's harder now, with skyrocketing prices. The game has changed, and that means more collective action with regard to buying property. For exemple, more than one or two people have to contribute to buying a house in this city. Or instead of buying a brownstone, an individual may have to settle for buying an apartment. Second, that economically distressed neighborhoods become as diverse as possible; diversity brings a lot of benefits and goes a long way to end segregation that has been too long a part of this city.

Like I said, I understand the realities of this city and its neighborhoods (growing up in an NYC PJ, I know very well!). And due to a lot of issues affecting this city (affordability, gentrification, quality of life, etc), there will always be heated discussions with different perspectives. I will be mindful of that, and will attempt to be more civil in the future. Peace.

(sorry for the long-winded response!).
the long winded response was well said. thanks for replying. good post.
and ps you're actually one of the more civil people on the forum!
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