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Old 12-01-2014, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,086 posts, read 32,655,211 times
Reputation: 7563

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlem resident View Post
Yes, they are an angry bunch.

But the social service buildings on FDB and St. Nicholas are even worse in my opinion.
Between 127th and 135th it is just about every building.

The Hampton Houses have some good tenants, old residents, but also a significant population very much like the worst of the projects across the way. The owners are trying to convert the buildings, renting re-habbed places for around $3,000. We could not believe it. People wrote terrible reviews after fleeing and I don't blame them.
I hear you - to be honest I'm not that fond of Central Harlem, for valid reasons.
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Old 12-01-2014, 07:10 PM
 
953 posts, read 1,168,811 times
Reputation: 770
So your daughter lives right across the street from the projects and you expected to feel "safe" and warm/cozy ?
Although its not that bad, this is a pretty dumb post.
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:03 PM
 
149 posts, read 220,061 times
Reputation: 137
I guess we believed the "Oh, Harlem has really changed….its a hip place to live" Now I see thats the case for a few specific blocks, ONLY.
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:06 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,886 posts, read 7,822,965 times
Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by globalideas View Post
I guess we believed the "Oh, Harlem has really changed….its a hip place to live" Now I see thats the case for a few specific blocks, ONLY.
Did a real estate agent tell you that ?

Because there is a lot of money involved, which might give one pause regarding certain opinions.

There is also the PC contingency, celebrating the "post racial" era and all.

But Harlem does have its very compelling aspects.
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:19 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
Reputation: 8529
Quote:
Originally Posted by globalideas View Post
I guess we believed the "Oh, Harlem has really changed….its a hip place to live" Now I see thats the case for a few specific blocks, ONLY.
This is true. The areas close to Columbia and the UWS have gentrified and you see nice new buildings and amenities. On the East Side, certain areas from 96th to 105th Street are nice (a lot of tear downs and gut renovations happening). Certain other areas are ghetto as ever (East Harlem from 110-125 and up), much of Central Harlem, and of course the area you mentioned.

Still, even the worst areas of Harlem are getting big real estate investment, the area where Pathmark is on 125 and Lexington got sold for 39 million. Upper Manhattan is pretty much bought out. The developers have to move those people out of social service housing and move them elsewhere (buyouts) and then get permits for either gut renovation or tear downs. There's certain enough money that keeps flowing into Manhattan for investment purposes to make all of Harlem nice, however this is going to take more years. If you're into real estate investment you might keep an eye out.
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:31 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,886 posts, read 7,822,965 times
Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
This is true. The areas close to Columbia and the UWS have gentrified and you see nice new buildings and amenities. On the East Side, certain areas from 96th to 105th Street are nice (a lot of tear downs and gut renovations happening). Certain other areas are ghetto as ever (East Harlem from 110-125 and up), much of Central Harlem, and of course the area you mentioned.

Still, even the worst areas of Harlem are getting big real estate investment, the area where Pathmark is on 125 and Lexington got sold for 39 million. Upper Manhattan is pretty much bought out. The developers have to move those people out of social service housing and move them elsewhere (buyouts) and then get permits for either gut renovation or tear downs. There's certain enough money that keeps flowing into Manhattan for investment purposes to make all of Harlem nice, however this is going to take more years. If you're into real estate investment you might keep an eye out.
The areas closest to Columbia are the least gentrified. The most gentrified area is FDB, which is not close to Columbia, with Lenox making a rapidly-gaining second. Lenox is not close to Columbia. The problem for both FDB and Lenox is ACP, a kind of bastion of a certain culture, shall we say.

Social service housing will not be going anywhere. The management companies mostly own the properties, for the most part. There are exceptions, but removing people from HPD-sanctioned housing is near-impossible. And people living in social service housing do not receive "buy outs." Nor are they entitled to.

Upper Manhattan is only "bought out" to the extent that it may be.

The "moment" for investment in Harlem, except for those with a great deal of cash to invest and a lot of time to wait - the buyer of the Hampton Houses (and several other nearby buildings) is a case in point - is long past.
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Old 12-01-2014, 11:22 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlem resident View Post
The areas closest to Columbia are the least gentrified. The most gentrified area is FDB, which is not close to Columbia, with Lenox making a rapidly-gaining second. Lenox is not close to Columbia. The problem for both FDB and Lenox is ACP, a kind of bastion of a certain culture, shall we say.

Social service housing will not be going anywhere. The management companies mostly own the properties, for the most part. There are exceptions, but removing people from HPD-sanctioned housing is near-impossible. And people living in social service housing do not receive "buy outs." Nor are they entitled to.

Upper Manhattan is only "bought out" to the extent that it may be.

The "moment" for investment in Harlem, except for those with a great deal of cash to invest and a lot of time to wait - the buyer of the Hampton Houses (and several other nearby buildings) is a case in point - is long past.
What do you mean by social service housing, first of all. It's very possible to move people from social service housing, but it depends on the program.

If it is just a building that takes Section 8 or the Aids HASA program, then the building is still privately owned and of course the tenants can be bought out.

Columbia University bought SROs and removed tenants in the past.

ooks.google.com/books?id=lHd25eE8Z1UC&pg=PA32&lpg=PA32&dq=Columbia +university+bought+SROs&source=bl&ots=3pGpSfmsJz&s ig=-XPWnuQLfV2jwwSMUplZ2EQcYN8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ZVl9VMbEH reasQTn6YGAAg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Columbia %20university%20bought%20SROs&f=false

If any building is in really bad shape, it can be simply DEMOLISHED! Some buildings are in such bad shape it's not worth it to do a gut renovation.

If the building is in such bad shape it's unsafe for tenants to live there (rent stabilized) the landlord is supposed to find them comparable housing while they renovate the apartments (and dramatically jack up the rents).

For the housing projects themselves, yes, they can move people out of them as well. It would take federal government approval and federal funding, and they'd have to resettle people elsewhere, but it has certainly happened in many cities. A couple of projects even got demolished in Brooklyn.

Between Frederick Douglas Boulevard and Columbia, those areas are pretty gentrified on streets like 116th Street. And yes, Lenox is nice as well and further away from Columbia. Still doesn't change that are nice parts of Harlem close to Columbia.
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Old 12-02-2014, 05:41 AM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,886 posts, read 7,822,965 times
Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
What do you mean by social service housing, first of all. It's very possible to move people from social service housing, but it depends on the program.

If it is just a building that takes Section 8 or the Aids HASA program, then the building is still privately owned and of course the tenants can be bought out.

Columbia University bought SROs and removed tenants in the past.

ooks.google.com/books?id=lHd25eE8Z1UC&pg=PA32&lpg=PA32&dq=Columbia +university+bought+SROs&source=bl&ots=3pGpSfmsJz&s ig=-XPWnuQLfV2jwwSMUplZ2EQcYN8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ZVl9VMbEH reasQTn6YGAAg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Columbia %20university%20bought%20SROs&f=false

If any building is in really bad shape, it can be simply DEMOLISHED! Some buildings are in such bad shape it's not worth it to do a gut renovation.

If the building is in such bad shape it's unsafe for tenants to live there (rent stabilized) the landlord is supposed to find them comparable housing while they renovate the apartments (and dramatically jack up the rents).

For the housing projects themselves, yes, they can move people out of them as well. It would take federal government approval and federal funding, and they'd have to resettle people elsewhere, but it has certainly happened in many cities. A couple of projects even got demolished in Brooklyn.

Between Frederick Douglas Boulevard and Columbia, those areas are pretty gentrified on streets like 116th Street. And yes, Lenox is nice as well and further away from Columbia. Still doesn't change that are nice parts of Harlem close to Columbia.
The "nice parts of Harlem" are not near Columbia.

Broadly speaking, you have no idea what you are talking about.
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
2,254 posts, read 2,622,619 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlem resident View Post
This is simply untrue and surely you know it.
Or perhaps do not.

I do believe that you have placed young transplant people there, however.
I grew up in bushwick projects in the 80's, it takes alot for me to think something is dangerous because of how i grew up.
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Old 12-02-2014, 08:32 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
Reputation: 8529
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlem resident View Post
The "nice parts of Harlem" are not near Columbia.

Broadly speaking, you have no idea what you are talking about.
Yes, I have frequently been to Columbia's campus and I have frequently been in West Harlem. I live in East Harlem.

The bad thing about the internet is for all I know you don't live in Harlem and you never do. City Data is full of people who post all sorts of stuff without NYC, when they do not even live here.

Please tell me what is bad about the renovated buildings near Morningside Park on 116th Street, or the new buildings built near 116th and 8th Avenue, not far from Columbia?

Then again I guess if you can't afford to live in them that's reason enough to hate them!

Harlem, I think you're just trolling when it comes to Harlem. Someone could post pictures of all the new buildings near Columbia, you would ignore this because it doesn't fit what you want to believe. Someone could post links, again you'll ignore it because it doesn't fit want you want to believe. So then you resort to personal attacks.

Last edited by NyWriterdude; 12-02-2014 at 08:45 PM..
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