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Old 12-02-2014, 02:27 PM
 
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I wouldn't do it.

I know some people that moved out further into NJ / LI and have ~2 hours each way. It's draining on them. One in particular is considering leaving, and has been doing that new commute for ~1 year.

I hired someone 90 miles from the office and it's already been a burden. Between the "can I leave early to catch my son's game" and the "hm, weather is bad, I'm going to work from home", I'm really going to reconsider candidates based on their zipcodes in the future. Unfortunate as he is otherwise a great candidate.
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Old 12-02-2014, 03:27 PM
 
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foxfirst:
Quote:
Thanks for your input! I actually have lived and worked in the city before and I really enjoyed it.
You're welcome! I hope things work out for you. I used to drive to work from Peekskill to Brewster about 25 miles. More times than not because of traffic the trip was more than an hour, often bumper to bumper on Route 6 or 202. It just gets on your nerves. I couldn't imagine doing it for 2 1/2 hours or more. We also had to work a lot of overtime which made the situation worse. Being that you live 2 1/2 hours north of the city you also have to take winter into consideration. Not knowing the type of work you're in. Is it possible that you could do this type of work from home? Maybe the firm in NYC will allow you to do that. You might also be able to work for them as a private contractor. If you are tops in your field and your services are in demand they might be open to the idea. As a private contractor the company pays for your services as needed, the downside is that there are no benefits such as healthcare or pension. Since your husband is working and I'm assuming he has those benefits it may not be an issue. We are self employed and have to pay for our own benefits but in spite of this and having worked for other people we wouldn't have it any other way. We also can live anywhere in the country that we choose that's why we now live in Arizona, which has been a life long dream.
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Old 12-02-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
8,475 posts, read 20,321,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mc33433 View Post
I wouldn't do it.

I know some people that moved out further into NJ / LI and have ~2 hours each way. It's draining on them. One in particular is considering leaving, and has been doing that new commute for ~1 year.

I hired someone 90 miles from the office and it's already been a burden. Between the "can I leave early to catch my son's game" and the "hm, weather is bad, I'm going to work from home", I'm really going to reconsider candidates based on their zipcodes in the future. Unfortunate as he is otherwise a great candidate.
Draining on them and everyone else.The people who commute from up the Hudson are extremely annoying with automatically being very late every time it snows and clamoring to leave as soon as it starts snowing during the day.If it snows over night they don't get to work until 10 and if it starts snowing at noon they want to leave at 1.And they don't want to come at all if the schools are closed in whatever god forsaken place they live.

I now know why there used to be a rule that NYC municipal employees had to live in the city.Long range commuting creates total havoc in the workplace because most people just dump their commuting issues on their bosses and co workers.

Last edited by bluedog2; 12-02-2014 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 12-02-2014, 04:52 PM
 
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If all you have time to do is work (possible more than 8 hours a day) and are even thinking about renting rooms Monday-Thursday in the middle of the week, have you thought about how this long term could effect your marriage?

If you're only available weekends I am sensing major strains in your marriage coming along over time. This isn't you having to occasionally make a business trip out of town or overseas. This is you literally never being home. This is completely unfair to your husband and if you were a man, I'd say it's unfair to your wife.

Even if your husband is understanding now, this may soon wear off.

Get a job much closer to where you are, and turn this job down.

And as others said, from the angle of the job if doing things with colleagues and coworkers is necessary (particularly to move up in this company or in the field) your 5 hour a commute eliminates that as well. You'd be giving yourself the worst of both worlds. And what happens when bad weather happens? You'll be the most likely to be late or not to even be able to show up, something that may cause problems as time goes by.
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Old 12-02-2014, 04:53 PM
 
24,071 posts, read 17,485,217 times
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Originally Posted by bluedog2 View Post
Draining on them and everyone else.The people who commute from up the Hudson are extremely annoying with automatically being very late every time it snows and clamoring to leave as soon as it starts snowing during the day.If it snows over night they don't get to work until 10 and if it starts snowing at noon they want to leave at 1.And they don't want to come at all if the schools are closed in whatever god forsaken place they live.

I now know why there used to be a rule that NYC municipal employees had to live in the city.Long range commuting creates total havoc in the workplace because most people just dump their commuting issues on their bosses and co workers.
Which is why a lot of people are now moving closer to their jobs, and which is why for jobs that pay well they often look at your geographic location.
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,853 posts, read 7,610,197 times
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I may be in the minority, but I would say to go for it if it's really your dream job. Keep in mind that the reason Metro-North runs all the way up is because there's people willing to make that long commute every day.

You could always bring some paperwork to do on the train, or just use that time to sleep. You're sitting in a chair for a good hour and a half or two hours, and you can just wear your pass on a lanyard around your neck for when the conductor comes.
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
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I'm curious - what's the dream job?
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
624 posts, read 750,786 times
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If the bulk of the commute is on metro north that is the best possible scenario. Driving to the nearest metro north station might be much faster and reliable then using buses, especially if it involves multiple bus transfers. If bus A is late and you miss bus B, and bus B only comes around every 30 minutes you lose a lot of time.

Getting an early or a late schedule might help manage time at home. Get up really early and sleep a little more on the train, get to work earlier and leave earlier. This might give you a few more hours at home but its still going to be horrible.

One long bus ride in the morning is another better option because you can sleep on the bus. Someone posted an article a while back about people living in the Poconos commuting to NYC by bus.

I've overheard some people on the weekend bus talking about how they live in delaware cheaply with a family and big house and have a rent stabilized apartment in nyc for work during the week.

Renting or selling your house and moving closer to NYC is another stressful extreme option.
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:54 PM
 
20,599 posts, read 13,599,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmatthew5876 View Post
If the bulk of the commute is on metro north that is the best possible scenario. Driving to the nearest metro north station might be much faster and reliable then using buses, especially if it involves multiple bus transfers. If bus A is late and you miss bus B, and bus B only comes around every 30 minutes you lose a lot of time.

Getting an early or a late schedule might help manage time at home. Get up really early and sleep a little more on the train, get to work earlier and leave earlier. This might give you a few more hours at home but its still going to be horrible.

One long bus ride in the morning is another better option because you can sleep on the bus. Someone posted an article a while back about people living in the Poconos commuting to NYC by bus.

I've overheard some people on the weekend bus talking about how they live in delaware cheaply with a family and big house and have a rent stabilized apartment in nyc for work during the week.

Renting or selling your house and moving closer to NYC is another stressful extreme option.
That last bit is technically illegal as a RS apartment is supposed to be one's primary residence, not a pied a terre.

Know it goes on but it burns my butt as the ones usually doing that sort of thing are the same bleeding heart liberals that complain about lack of affordable housing and how RS is needed to keep the "poor" in NYC.

If you can afford to own a house you aren't poor and certainly shouldn't be hanging onto a RS apartment.
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:57 PM
 
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Absolutely not.

Especially in winter time where there's so few hours of daylight anyways...you'd be living a life of complete darkness.

Literally all your day would either be at work, on your way to work or getting ready for work...and of course sleeping. God forbid you have a family, a relationship or a hobby..
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