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Old 12-08-2014, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Bronx
14,889 posts, read 17,458,236 times
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Carnegie Deli is amazing. Good Yiddish food here.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:12 AM
 
Location: NYC
11,836 posts, read 7,723,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Taking this apart piece by piece.


Before Starbucks "coffeeshop" was synonymous with diner. The coffee was in a grecian themed cup, and was likely only okay. There was nothing like espresso. That was mostly served with desert in real restaurants.

While there may have been a few places in the village that specialized in espresso and pastries, this was not something found everywhere or easily. It was Starbucks that established that.
Plenty of NYC cafes before Starbucks served espressos, it was Starbucks that introduced Americans to espressos.

I was getting Espresso at my local Korean deli every morning. Also used to be Timothy's Coffee around until Starbucks ran them out of town. The problem with getting coffee in NYC is there aren't enough good ones. There are some good coffee trucks but transplants are afraid of carts.

Quote:
Never been to 3Gs. But the Pastrami at Katz's and Carnegie is still really good. Yes, I know their touristy. So what?
Katzs is overrated. Carnegie's overpriced. Soon both will be gone due to rent. You can't charge $30+ for a pastrami sandwich when I can get one in Brooklyn for 1/2.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:55 AM
 
9,973 posts, read 8,471,531 times
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Katz overrated? Not for it's core stuff. The pastrami is as good and any and better than most that I've had. That's what people go for (and the "When Harry met Sally" silliness.) But they won't be gone due to rent. They own the building, and recently sold the air rights. Something may get built over them, but they're not going anywhere. Carnegie may own their building also, but I'm not so sure of that. I can't see anyone getting more out of that retail space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post

Katzs is overrated. Carnegie's overpriced. Soon both will be gone due to rent. You can't charge $30+ for a pastrami sandwich when I can get one in Brooklyn for 1/2.
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, NYC
1,844 posts, read 1,098,256 times
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I think people need to spend a decent amount of time living in other cities to have a true opinion on the commercial NYC. In Chicago, there's no such thing as a deli and food carts pretty much don't exist. Raves are essentially outlawed, and mom n' pop places are rare. Most people there consider the best pizza place Lu Manati's, which is a chain (and I probably spelled it wrong, but I never found it that good so I don't really care).

Of course this may be my bias showing, but I like that we have the reverse of that. Yeah it's a little scary seeing some places disappear, I've seen my fair share of things disappear in the last 4 years, but NYC is still far from the commercial staleness of most cities in the US.
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:17 PM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,068,687 times
Reputation: 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Taking this apart piece by piece.


Before Starbucks "coffeeshop" was synonymous with diner. The coffee was in a grecian themed cup, and was likely only okay. There was nothing like espresso. That was mostly served with desert in real restaurants.

While there may have been a few places in the village that specialized in espresso and pastries, this was not something found everywhere or easily. It was Starbucks that established that.

What you're seeing with that is things that work being cloned. In NYC, since people walk, people wont travel to far for what the want. So the business bring it to them.

I remember the days prior to the proliferation of chain drug stores. Getting a prescription was a major PITA. Places were open during the day on weekdays and maybe a few hours on the weekends. It was a crap shoot if they took insurance. When the chains showed up, with their long hours and better systems, it was a HUGE improvement.

Oh, and in addition to prescriptions, they've become the neighborhood dry goods stores. In this role, they basically replaced the Woolworth's and Lamston's chains that had previously disappeared.

Disney owns a couple out of a large number of theaters. And they've done some pretty interesting things with them.

Never been to 3Gs. But the Pastrami at Katz's and Carnegie is still really good. Yes, I know their touristy. So what?


Sorry, I'm going to say this even if the mods don't like it. Your full of $hit.
If Nyc was not desirable anymore, the rents wouldn't be so damn high. Haters are going to hate.
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:26 PM
 
102 posts, read 152,997 times
Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
Plenty of NYC cafes before Starbucks served espressos, it was Starbucks that introduced Americans to espressos.

I was getting Espresso at my local Korean deli every morning. Also used to be Timothy's Coffee around until Starbucks ran them out of town. The problem with getting coffee in NYC is there aren't enough good ones. There are some good coffee trucks but transplants are afraid of carts.



Katzs is overrated. Carnegie's overpriced. Soon both will be gone due to rent. You can't charge $30+ for a pastrami sandwich when I can get one in Brooklyn for 1/2.
Katz won't be gone. They own the property. You should expect to see a new development there in the next 5 years with a Katz as the retail tenant.
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Old 12-08-2014, 01:05 PM
 
30,378 posts, read 31,261,031 times
Reputation: 14040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javawood View Post
I think people need to spend a decent amount of time living in other cities to have a true opinion on the commercial NYC.
I agree. As one who has lived in different large cities within the USA and overseas, I can state that NYC is still unique!
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Old 12-08-2014, 01:38 PM
 
495 posts, read 448,009 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javawood View Post
I think people need to spend a decent amount of time living in other cities to have a true opinion on the commercial NYC. In Chicago, there's no such thing as a deli and food carts pretty much don't exist. Raves are essentially outlawed, and mom n' pop places are rare. Most people there consider the best pizza place Lu Manati's, which is a chain (and I probably spelled it wrong, but I never found it that good so I don't really care).

Of course this may be my bias showing, but I like that we have the reverse of that. Yeah it's a little scary seeing some places disappear, I've seen my fair share of things disappear in the last 4 years, but NYC is still far from the commercial staleness of most cities in the US.
This is absolutely correct. And I would say the majority of the rest of America the image of city (more often than not) is Quiznos, burger King, McDonald's, CVS, walgreenes, subway, Bank of America, Wendy's, starbucks, dunkin donuts, Pizza Hut express Taco Bell, blimpie, and maybe potbelly sandwichworks

That's what you have. And after about 9pm it's best to go home unless you want to smoke and drink the lowest of the lowest phiz draft beers and no food....and listen to slow loud awful annoying overplayed hiphop songs with people pushing and shoving at a bar where nobody talks to anybody and you just get wasted and that's it for nightlife

I just don't want New York to become this. There's actually people in this country who don't know what I'm talking about and have never in their lives heard of any other place to go for dessert than Starbucks for a cookie or Olive garden. Some parts of the country going to Dunkin constitutes "eating out to dinner".
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Old 12-08-2014, 01:53 PM
 
263 posts, read 396,691 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Zero View Post
Of all the things mentioned in this thread, this is one thing that I would argue is much better today than it was when I was growing up. Overall the park is safer, the great lawn is no longer a dust bowl, there are fewer discarded condoms in the Ramble, etc.

You're right of course, my intent was to imply that Central Park was always a nice part of the city, and still is, however how soon I forget that back in the 80's there were parts, and times of day that a leisurely stroll through would have been akin to suicide
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Old 12-08-2014, 02:18 PM
 
495 posts, read 448,009 times
Reputation: 369
But, much like how mosquitoes and bugs are an essential ingredient in why forests have that green hue and without those bugs it wouldn't be so green,

The spontaneity in NYC that comprised part of the city's uniqueness came with the sideffect of some unruliness. That unruliness is part of the expression of a local vibe. The lack of this is the presence of a transient vibe...of the city being transformed into a showplace and not as much one's backyard

Kind of like in the home you were raised in as a kid, the family Living Room vs your bedroom...where was your comfort zone to get wild and throw a ball around or throw stuff on the floor. I would bet your bedroom. What was a pleasure to show guests who walked into your home for a night of friends over to eat homecooked dinner? The Living Room

NYC is developing into a Living Room design and used to be more a bedroom. It is more transient-friendly but it's getting harder to sustain living in as home.
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