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Old 05-13-2015, 10:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
They didn't want to end them. The landlord lobby didn't want them to end, they just wanted them weakened, which is what happened. A true free market in apartments in NYC is as terrifying to the landlords as the regulated tenants. Without regulation, the market would loosen up, and they may not be able to get tippy top dollar for open apartments like they can now.
That was a different time then before Manhattan and big parts of Brooklyn and Queens became expensive.

Now with very few rent controlled units left, and far fewer rent stabilized units in hot neigborhoods landlords may want them to end. While neighborhoods on the outskirts of the city won't see dramatic price increases, those in and near Manhattan will.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
No. Why? Let them move to Florida, and when they need Medicaid, we won't have to pay for it.
Plenty of senior citizens who can afford NYC remain here in retirement.

The moving to some Southern dump is for people with no money or just social security.
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Old 05-13-2015, 02:47 PM
 
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If the can afford it fine. I just wouldn't give them special privileges (this was responding to the post that said only senior citizens should get rent regulation.)

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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Plenty of senior citizens who can afford NYC remain here in retirement.

The moving to some Southern dump is for people with no money or just social security.
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Old 05-20-2015, 08:08 PM
 
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Rent stabilized apartments at least those with "cheap" rents are going the way of rent controlled and the Dodo for that matter. That is to say in a generation or so they will be largely if not totally extinct. What will remain are those created under so called "affordable housing" schemes.

The average age of a RS tenant is >45 IIRC if not >50; that is Baby Boomers including the tail end (those born until 1964). With more days behind them than in front these units will become vacant via death, old age frailty, economics and other reasons. Once that event occurs the "cheap" rent will vanish. Even if the LL cannot get the unit up to $2500 for decontrol, it probably will be near enough that one or two increases should get them there. Many LLs now tend to frown upon taking "lifers" into below market RS apartments because they want turn over and the vacancy increases that event brings.

Persons enjoying below market RS or RC rents benefit from longevity of tenancy. That is they moved in a decade or more ago and have never left.

The City may think it can play games but the cards are with property owners. Anyone who lived in NYC during the 1980's or so knows LLs warehoused a good number of units in Manhattan and elsewhere for various reasons.

Most of the apartment rental stock in NYC is owned by the great Jewish real estate families. These people play hardball for the long run. If a developer/property owner cannot do this or that *now* he has children and grand children.....

Proof of this can be found all around the City in particular the UES/Yorkville from Third to East End Avenue. Ages old tenements are being purchased for astronomical sums, emptied out of tenants (RS and otherwise) and torn down for redevelopment.
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Old 05-23-2015, 10:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
No. Why? Let them move to Florida, and when they need Medicaid, we won't have to pay for it.
We shouldn't give special privileges to able bodied people. If you can work, go out there and work for a living. No welfare babies, no section 9 etc. IMO, only senior citizens should be given special privileges.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by The Ryu View Post
We shouldn't give special privileges to able bodied people. If you can work, go out there and work for a living. No welfare babies, no section 9 etc. IMO, only senior citizens should be given special privileges.
Repped!
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Old 05-24-2015, 12:22 PM
 
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Generally the richer ones. If you have the money NYC can be a very nice place to retire. But that's a BIG if.

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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Plenty of senior citizens who can afford NYC remain here in retirement.
A lot of people who have some money, but not big money, who could marginally retire in NYC (or could barely not float themselves in retirement here), move elsewhere (the South or other), and live like kings.

Quote:

The moving to some Southern dump is for people with no money or just social security.
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Old 05-24-2015, 03:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Generally the richer ones. If you have the money NYC can be a very nice place to retire. But that's a BIG if.



A lot of people who have some money, but not big money, who could marginally retire in NYC (or could barely not float themselves in retirement here), move elsewhere (the South or other), and live like kings.
The living like Kings in the South is bull****. Bye the time many of them move there they have one foot on the banana peel and the other on the grave. You tend to have to drive long distances to get to places in the South and services are much worse than they are in NY. I have known people who had to travel an hour or two just to get to their doctors.

NC is taxing the retirement income of out of state retirees because they don't wsnt old poor New Yorkers draining their medicaid fund.

Alabama rejected additional medicaid money. Again they aren't terribly eager to spend resources on old people dumped on them ftom elsewhere.
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Old 05-25-2015, 11:54 AM
 
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My next door neighbor retired to NC, and last I heard from him, he was loving ti down there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
The living like Kings in the South is bull****. Bye the time many of them move there they have one foot on the banana peel and the other on the grave. You tend to have to drive long distances to get to places in the South and services are much worse than they are in NY. I have known people who had to travel an hour or two just to get to their doctors.

NC is taxing the retirement income of out of state retirees because they don't wsnt old poor New Yorkers draining their medicaid fund.

Alabama rejected additional medicaid money. Again they aren't terribly eager to spend resources on old people dumped on them ftom elsewhere.
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Old 05-25-2015, 01:39 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
My next door neighbor retired to NC, and last I heard from him, he was loving ti down there.
Everyone is different and the South is a huge region. NC also is raising taxes on retirement income from retirees out of state because old people dumped on them have depleted their medicaid fund.

To be honest old people tend to hate change and tend to like their routines. No old person really wants to move to another place and start all over again (losing their support network). This happens because they feel they have no choice. Particularly for those renting apartments who can't afford to pay the rent in retirement, and of course landlords do all they can to get rid of long term rent stabilized tenants.

Many of these people when they are dumped out of their homes would have no family or friends outside of NY, and being places like NC are not so eager to take them in. So where should they go, the ocean?

NYC should have more housing subsidies for old people who spent their adult lives working and contributing to NYC. Or they can encourage more buildings to go co-op (that way people can buy their apartments and building maintenance is MUCH lower than RENT).

This whole go to the South is really working class people being suckered. If you paid taxes in NY while you worked if you need the help in old age THEY owe you. Not NC or some Southern state. You have every right to stay here and find a way to make it work even if it is with government help.
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