U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-16-2015, 05:03 PM
 
3,012 posts, read 5,525,044 times
Reputation: 1503

Advertisements

I know you get taxed a lot but do you get some of that money back during tax refunds?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-16-2015, 06:34 PM
 
257 posts, read 497,331 times
Reputation: 178
City employees don't get taxed more than any other NYC resident. The only difference is that they have to pay the NYC income tax even if they live outside of the city - between 2.9% and 3.9% depending on income. You could get something back, if you overpaid, but that also has very little to do with who your employer is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 07:19 PM
 
3,012 posts, read 5,525,044 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychopompos View Post
City employees don't get taxed more than any other NYC resident. The only difference is that they have to pay the NYC income tax even if they live outside of the city - between 2.9% and 3.9% depending on income. You could get something back, if you overpaid, but that also has very little to do with who your employer is.
So if someone lives in NJ but works for the City of New York, they're taxed both by NYC and NJ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 07:56 AM
 
314 posts, read 287,667 times
Reputation: 243
NYC employees must pay the "city waiver tax" if they live outside the city limits. It's basically the same as NYC income tax.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 08:18 AM
 
257 posts, read 497,331 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshFresh View Post
So if someone lives in NJ but works for the City of New York, they're taxed both by NYC and NJ?
Yes.

Everyone who lives in NJ but works in NYC gets "taxed" by both states. In practice NY tax is withheld from your paycheck and when you file your NJ return you take credit for it. On top of that, City employees get to pay the NYC income tax as if they were residents of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
1,271 posts, read 2,552,493 times
Reputation: 811
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychopompos View Post
Yes.

Everyone who lives in NJ but works in NYC gets "taxed" by both states. In practice NY tax is withheld from your paycheck and when you file your NJ return you take credit for it. On top of that, City employees get to pay the NYC income tax as if they were residents of the city.
To clarify, you wouldn't end up ever paying tax in NJ, with a few exceptions.

Someone who lives in NJ and works in NY (whether NYC or not) has NY state tax withheld from their paycheck. They get a credit in NJ for any taxes paid in NY. NJ and NY's tax rates are very similar, though NJ's are slightly higher at middle incomes and NY's are slightly higher at upper incomes. The person living in NJ but working in NY state would always end up paying the higher of the two, but it's not much difference (no more than $100 either way except at very high incomes (>$400k or so a year)).

Normally, you don't pay NYC tax if you don't live in NYC, so a person who lives in NJ and works in NYC is taxed the same way as a person who lives in NJ and works in NY state outside of NYC. However, if you work for the city government, you pay NYC tax regardless of residence. Thus, the person who lives in NJ and works for NYC government will pay NYS tax and NYC tax, but will get a credit for both against their NJ taxes and will thus never owe any tax to NJ (unless they have a separate source of income in NJ, such as taxable investments or a second job in NJ, which wouldn't be taxed in NYS or NYC).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 08:55 AM
 
Location: NYC
11,818 posts, read 7,691,265 times
Reputation: 12811
City pays so little, how do they expect people to live here. I've looked up jobs for my position in the city and they're paying 30-50% below market rate. I'm sure the pension may make up for that but who knows if you can stay around to get that when I can make the 50% more in private companies and be way ahead. The salaries they pay barely supports a family of 3.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 10:00 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,062,709 times
Reputation: 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
City pays so little, how do they expect people to live here. I've looked up jobs for my position in the city and they're paying 30-50% below market rate. I'm sure the pension may make up for that but who knows if you can stay around to get that when I can make the 50% more in private companies and be way ahead. The salaries they pay barely supports a family of 3.
Yes it pays lows but it's not only the pension that's a plus, you have the job security, less demanding work volume, union representative for most, medical benefits, holidays off and short work weeks. Most city workers have 35 hour work weeks. There are certain agencies and positions where you can get a lot of ot if you're a workaholic. City positions are ideal for families in my opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 10:12 AM
bg7
 
7,698 posts, read 7,627,262 times
Reputation: 14991
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyccs View Post
Yes it pays lows but it's not only the pension that's a plus, you have the job security, less demanding work volume, union representative for most, medical benefits, holidays off and short work weeks. Most city workers have 35 hour work weeks. There are certain agencies and positions where you can get a lot of ot if you're a workaholic. City positions are ideal for families in my opinion.

Exactly! If you only look at pay you are just not being honest about the difference between private sector and city. They are all sorts of non-monetary benefits, which you have listed well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2015, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
9,832 posts, read 21,491,753 times
Reputation: 3503
I am a state not city employee and we do not get any special tax privileges with the exception of having access to certain pre-tax benefits like transportation, medical, etc. I would imagine it is the same for city employees. Teachers are eligible for some additional write-offs if I remember correctly such as paying for your own supplies etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top