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Old 05-29-2015, 06:11 PM
 
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I don't consider myself myself middle class. More working class. But I pay about 800-900+ a month in food, 600 for car payment and insurance, 700 for private school tuition, 300 for extracurricular activities for him, 150 for extras for me (gym, trainer one a month, and occasionally dance class. I do like to shop. I don't need a baby sitter b/c 90% of my family lives in my city and both grandmas are 10 minutes away. Going out to eat maybe one a week (in between fast food and the four season). Health insurance deducted from my paycheck so I'm not counting that. Savings. Not counting basic bills, like cell phone, cable, con ed. Shopping would change from month to month. I like to take my son to the museums and parks and if I don't go with my sister-in-law I have to pay.
I don't count housing b/c I own my co-op and my co-op fee is extremely low since it is a hdfc.
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Old 05-29-2015, 06:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by allnaturalkiki View Post
I don't consider myself myself middle class. More working class. But I pay about 800-900+ a month in food, 600 for car payment and insurance, 700 for private school tuition, 300 for extracurricular activities for him, 150 for extras for me (gym, trainer one a month, and occasionally dance class. I do like to shop. I don't need a baby sitter b/c 90% of my family lives in my city and both grandmas are 10 minutes away. Going out to eat maybe one a week (in between fast food and the four season). Health insurance deducted from my paycheck so I'm not counting that. Savings. Not counting basic bills, like cell phone, cable, con ed. Shopping would change from month to month. I like to take my son to the museums and parks and if I don't go with my sister-in-law I have to pay.
I don't count housing b/c I own my co-op and my co-op fee is extremely low since it is a hdfc.
It's interesting that you wouldn't consider yourself middle class. Your lifestyle sounds middle class with car, trainer and private school.
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Old 05-29-2015, 06:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NYCLotteryGurl View Post
YODEL, I think each individual should be making 150K to 175K each to survive comfortably with one child. 2 kids is a different story. Combined, the family should be earning around 350K to live comfortably.

If not, they can still survive, but the child won't really have nice things or high end things. But that doesn't really matter because when a child is young, name brands don't matter till they're in their teens.
I believe that 350K puts someone in the 1%. Even in New York, it's not middle class.
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Old 05-29-2015, 06:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BrightRabbit View Post
I can't answer your big question, but on this item, had to say: my husband also had to wear a professional type wardrobe. He got onto Ebay, bought expensive suits and blazers in a somewhat larger size with top quality fabric, took them to a tailor, and came out looking better in a custom-fitted suit than anyone. He'd get 7-fold silk ties that cost $100 for less than $20. and those always fit. We saved a ton of money every year.

Also look for kids clothing and shoes on Ebay, under "new with tags" if you can't adjust to used clothing.
That's interesting, thanks for the tip!
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Old 05-29-2015, 06:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NYer23 View Post
You can live for less while having a middle class lifestyle in NYC if your willing to seek housing in the co-op apartment market (2 br apartment or converted 1 bedroom into 2br), which a lot of people do.
Housing can really change everything. It's hard to argue about this because people have very fixed ideas about where and what type of housing is "middle class". Personally, I also think that living around really wealthy people skews things too. Someone who's not as well off as others in their circle can start to think of themselves as struggling, even if most people in the country would consider them to be wealthy.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by yodel View Post
It's interesting that you wouldn't consider yourself middle class. Your lifestyle sounds middle class with car, trainer and private school.
I am an RN and since middle class is usually 100k and up I don't meet the criteria. If I had to pay actual nyc housing cost I wouldn't be able to afford that lifestyle. I probably don't even pay Oklahoma housing cost.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:44 PM
 
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Yea actually googled it the averge rent is 682 my maintenance fee is a tiny bit more than half of that so that is why I do not consider myself middle class.
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Old 05-30-2015, 03:19 AM
 
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don't confuse middle class life style , median incomes and middle class incomes . they are not the same things. articles interchange all 3 all the time.

they reference one and point to the other .

a median income and middle class income only mean that is where the bulk of incomes fall out but depending where you live it can buy a pretty crappy lifestyle..

a middle class lifestyle down south or out west in many locations which takes 60k can require 2x that here.

according to an article in the new york times:

The average Manhattan apartment, at $3,973 a month, costs almost $2,800 more than the average rental nationwide. The average sale price of a home in Manhattan last year was $1.46 million, according to a recent Douglas Elliman report, while the average sale price for a new home in the United States was just under $230,000. The middle class makes up a smaller proportion of the population in New York than elsewhere in the nation. New Yorkers also live in a notably unequal place. Household incomes in Manhattan are about as evenly distributed as they are in Bolivia or Sierra Leone — the wealthiest fifth of Manhattanites make 40 times more than the lowest fifth, according to 2010 census data.



There is no single, formal definition of class status in this country. Statisticians and demographers all use slightly different methods to divvy up the great American whole into quintiles and median ranges. Complicating things, most people like to think of themselves as middle class. It feels good, after all, and more egalitarian than proclaiming yourself to be rich or poor. A $70,000 annual income is middle class for a family of four, according to the median response in a recent Pew Research Center survey, and yet people at a wide range of income levels, including those making less than $30,000 and more than $100,000 a year, said they, too, belonged to the middle.

By one measure, in cities like Houston or Phoenix — places considered by statisticians to be more typical of average United States incomes than New York — a solidly middle-class life can be had for wages that fall between $33,000 and $100,000 a year.

By the same formula — measuring by who sits in the middle of the income spectrum — Manhattan’s middle class exists somewhere between $45,000 and $134,000.

But if you are defining middle class by lifestyle, to accommodate the cost of living in Manhattan, that salary would have to fall between $80,000 and $235,000. This means someone making $70,000 a year in other parts of the country would need to make $166,000 in Manhattan to enjoy the same purchasing power.

Using the rule of thumb that buyers should expect to spend two and a half times their annual salary on a home purchase, the properties in Manhattan that could be said to be middle class would run between $200,000 and $588,000.

On the low end, the pickings are slim. The least expensive properties are mostly uptown, in neighborhoods like Yorkville, Washington Heights and Inwood. The most pleasing options in this range, however, are one-bedroom apartments not designed for children or families.

It is not surprising, then, that a family of four with an annual income of $68,700 or less qualifies to apply for the New York City Housing Authority’s public housing.
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:00 AM
 
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Anyone who is making less than 80,000 a year in this city is wasting their time
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Old 05-30-2015, 09:02 AM
 
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folks can survive on just social security here and in fact do but it isn't the retirement life i would want.

asking how much is enough is like asking how long a rope should be.

there is no answer . we all make do with what we have and most of us wish we had more.

i consider our retirement income here very good and certainly in the upper range of most retirement income ranges but that does not mean i wouldn't love to have and find a use for double that amount. that wouldn't be a high end lifestyle by any means either, just a good solid upper middle class if i had 2x ..
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