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Old 06-03-2015, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Bronx
14,966 posts, read 17,509,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Barbara Boxer, senator from California is a graduate of Brooklyn College. Joy Behar went to Queens College.

Obama isn't from NY, but he has a degree from Columbia. Ruth Bader Ginsburg went to Columbia law school..Sonia Sotomayor, first latina supreme court justice, is from the Bronx. Yet she wentbto Princeton and Harvard.
I'm not sure if you know anything about the high court, but it is known as the i95 court because all of the Justices attended IVY Leagues which are only located in the Northeast. Much of the countries intelligentsia comes from these schools. The CUNY school I went to created plenty of politicians, but no supreme court justice yet.
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Old 06-03-2015, 01:25 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,712,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Yes. NYC has some of the best educational oppoerunities in the nation.
Exactly, you just have to take advantage of the opportunities.

The elite public schools in NYC are the best in the country. But to get in, you have to test in. Guess who is testing in? The Asian community is dominating admissions, and these are not rich Manhattan Asians, these are working class immigrant types stuffed into tiny apartments in Sunset Park and the like. These families have little money, and the parents often only have a grade-school education.

If you work hard, there's a decent chance that good things will happen. If you wait for life to happen, it probably won't.
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Old 06-03-2015, 01:28 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,712,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Barbara Boxer, senator from California is a graduate of Brooklyn College. Joy Behar went to Queens College.

Obama isn't from NY, but he has a degree from Columbia. Ruth Bader Ginsburg went to Columbia law school..Sonia Sotomayor, first latina supreme court justice, is from the Bronx. Yet she wentbto Princeton and Harvard.
Sonia Sotomayor grew up in the projects in the Bronx, so it shows that the poor can succeed.

There are actually a huge number of elite Americans who grew up in the NYC projects, esp. Jewish Americans. I know no one wants to talk about things like this, but certain ethnic groups (Jews, Chinese) have their s--- together better than others. And I am speaking as someone who is from an ethnic background that is not particularly successful.

I've also noticed that the Haitians in NYC really have their priorities straight. They come from the poorest county in the Americas, and in one generation they are doctors and lawyers. The Guyanese seem pretty good too. Dominicans seem to be pretty entrepreneurial and seem to be moving up, in time, too, though maybe a bit slower.
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:00 PM
 
2,179 posts, read 1,731,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Um, Sotomayor is a Puerto Rican Catholic from the projects of the East Bronx. I had no ideas that Puerto Ricans in the Bronx projects were super "privileged".

Six of the nine justices of the Supreme Court are Catholic, so I think you can stop with your ridiculous anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.
Ignore him, his rants aren't worth the energy.
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,966 posts, read 17,509,383 times
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People forget that we live in a capitalist country. Anyone can make it, but it all depends on luck or sheer resilience to keep on striving. A kid from the projects who went to Crappie NYC public schools from k to 12 and on to college can do alright. Not everyone can pull themselves out because most poor lack capital in general compared to the rich. A kid can make it out of the hood, but rest of his or her cohort can't and won't due to the competitiveness of capitalism and a lack of money to invest grow, being creative, ingenuity and so forth.
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:10 PM
DAS
 
2,530 posts, read 5,839,306 times
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Originally Posted by UAE50 View Post
Erm, you might want to check out the facts...

More Billionaires were born in New York City than any city in the world - Business Insider

The most prominent CEO in America -- Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein - grew up in New York City public housing. Being the cultural and economic capital of the world, it's obvious to see why so many successful people grew up and live in NYC.
It is not the place. It is because there are 8+ million people here so there is going to be more of everything here. More doctors, more police officers, more street sweepers, more politicians etc. What is the actual ratio of a successful future and growing up in NYC?

Recent NYT article on this:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...abt=0002&abg=0

They always show a random individual that beat all the odds to be successful. How many did they leave behind in the projects? You don't see Lloyd Blankfein posing with 100 people that he grew up with that became as successful as he is.

There is only one Judge Sotomayer. The projects were different in 1957 than they are now. If you had a person in your family that was in trouble with the law at any time in their lives you could not get an apartment there. You also had to have 1 working adult in your family. Her project was also racially mixed at the time, Puerto Ricans, Blacks, Jews and Italians. When the heroin epidemic took hold in her project, her family moved to Coop City. Also her family was really together, her brother became a doctor. She also graduated from the prestigious Hunter High School here in NYC. Her family moved up the ladder step by step giving her better opportunities.

If the child is smart enough to get into a school like Bronx Science, or Hunter and to do well there, that is good. However, many people will go to regular public school, be average students, with working parents that have no connections, in a global city full of billionaires and the well connected, while the family struggles just to make ends meet. Reality check. People with children have to look at their situation and make decisions. The period of time from birth to age 18 is very short.

Last edited by DAS; 06-03-2015 at 02:26 PM..
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:15 PM
DAS
 
2,530 posts, read 5,839,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Yes. NYC has some of the best educational oppoerunities in the nation.
It does. However you have to bright, and your parents have to be somewhat connected at least to their local politicians, to get information, and access. Parents may find out about things, and usually even though the time period to apply for things is still in range, the connected ones already have the slots. I'm referring to the average working Joe and Jane.
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:18 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,712,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAS View Post
If the child is smart enough to get into a school like Bronx Science, or Hunter and to do well there that is good. However, many people will go to regular public school, be average students, with working parents that have no connections, in a global city full of billionaires and the well connected. While the family struggles just to make ends meet. Reality check. People with children have to look at their situation and make decisions. The period of time from birth to age 18 is very short.
I know lots of black and Hispanic people who grew up in the projects in recent years and seem to be doing fine. Obviously not many people become billionaires or Supreme Court justices but there are lots of people who are (say) 30-40 and African American or Puerto Rican and doing just fine for themselves after growing up in NYCHA.

One of my best friends dates a lady who is black and grew up in the projects in East NY, and she ended up going to Princeton for grad school and is now a Deputy Commissioner (basically the #2 person) at one of the largest municipal departments in the city. I won't name the department because no reason to disturb her privacy.
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:19 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,712,002 times
Reputation: 9782
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAS View Post
It does. However you have to bright, and your parents have to be somewhat connected at least to their local politicians, to get information, and access. Parents may find out about things, and usually even though the time period to apply for things is still in range, the connected ones already have the slots. I'm referring to the average working Joe and Jane.
What about all the Asians that dominate admissions at the elite public schools? You really think their parents are "connected"? Often they work 100-hour weeks and speak no English.
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Old 06-03-2015, 02:53 PM
DAS
 
2,530 posts, read 5,839,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
What about all the Asians that dominate admissions at the elite public schools? You really think their parents are "connected"? Often they work 100-hour weeks and speak no English.
First you tend to stereo type people. You seem to think all people of certain groups are the same. Many of your stereo types are very outdated. You should also know that many 2nd generations are very different from the first.

Yes many are connected it are believe it or not. Not in the way that you may think of connected, but in a way that works for them. I work around some. Many Indians and other Asians are educated when they get here, while not having to work in sweat shops, they start out with jobs well beneath where they left off at back in their home countries.

They find out about the specialized HS and the Ivy's early on, and how and where to prep for them, whether they are Chinese sweat shop employees or transit workers.

Everyone's goal is to get their child into Harvard.

If you really look at who gets in Specialized HS's there is list on an old thread on this forum but easy enough to look up. You will notice out of the percentage of students that take the test, the group with the highest percentage to get accepted are Whites, not Asians. More Asians actually take the test but less of them get in. Since more Asians take the test than any other group there are more of them accepted.

Blacks and Latino's tend to go more for private school scholarships for their gifted youth. This is more for the emotional and psychological well being of the child since these programs that help get them the scholarships offer emotional support as well as tutoring through out the years that they attend these schools. The Black and Latin youth can feel isolated and lonely at the specialized schools with many Asians. Even though usually all gifted students that are accepted in these schools usually come from good homes, with parents that push them to succeed. The bad press on Black and Latin people tends to have immigrant parents keep their youth away from Black and Latin youth. Which is hard for teens to deal with. Some specialized HS are more racially mixed than others and this is not a problem.
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