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Old 09-30-2015, 08:31 PM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,104,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norwood Boy View Post
I think people are more comfortable with their own ethnic groups. That's been happening since the first Irishman or Italian came through Ellis Island. Then you have economic powers at play. Multi millionaires on Park Ave are not going to interact or travel in the same circles as a middle class guy in Morris Park.
BTW Westchester County prevailed in the court of appeals that they are NOT racist. Money dictates where people reside.
I think comfort with their own ethnic groups is at it's strongest when people arrive in NYC with no English language skills. Once they speak English comfortably and assimilate more into the American mainstream interacting with other ethnic groups is a lot easier.

I think people in all ethnic groups tend to want to assimilate into the American mainstream. As people move up socioeconomically they tend to move out of ethnic neighborhoods to the expensive parts of NYC or the suburbs or other parts of the US. You see a lot of that on this forum even.
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Old 09-30-2015, 09:06 PM
 
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NYC is both diverse and segregated, and these facts are not at odds. Having lived a number of years in Manhattan I concur with much of what the posters above said about the city - individual neighborhoods are indeed segregated.
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Old 09-30-2015, 10:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElysianEagle View Post
NYC is both diverse and segregated, and these facts are not at odds. Having lived a number of years in Manhattan I concur with much of what the posters above said about the city - individual neighborhoods are indeed segregated.
No neighborhood though is entirely one race of person. Not in the 21st century. They may be predominately of one race but they often have at least one or two major ethnic or racial groups in them, as well as other groups at much smaller numbers.
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Old 09-30-2015, 10:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I think comfort with their own ethnic groups is at it's strongest when people arrive in NYC with no English language skills. Once they speak English comfortably and assimilate more into the American mainstream interacting with other ethnic groups is a lot easier.

I think people in all ethnic groups tend to want to assimilate into the American mainstream. As people move up socioeconomically they tend to move out of ethnic neighborhoods to the expensive parts of NYC or the suburbs or other parts of the US. You see a lot of that on this forum even.
20 years later they'll probably be running back to hood. Thats whats happening now with the gentry types anyway.
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Old 09-30-2015, 11:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Relaxx View Post
20 years later they'll probably be running back to hood. Thats whats happening now with the gentry types anyway.
That already happens now. The kids of immigrants who do have mainstream access do indeed come to big cities to go to school and look for professional jobs, same as other Americans. But they are coming back affluent and are really no different from whites who do the same thing. The point is that as they have the opportunities immigrants/minorities move up socioeconomically and join the US mainstream. They do not want to remain isolated in ethnic ghettoes.

The current Harlem (undergoing gentrification and expansion of it's institutions for example) may be in transition but it's not a hood or an ethnic neighborhood.
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Old 10-01-2015, 10:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
No neighborhood though is entirely one race of person. Not in the 21st century. They may be predominately of one race but they often have at least one or two major ethnic or racial groups in them, as well as other groups at much smaller numbers.
Do you realize what you're claiming? Of course no neighborhood is just of one race/ethnicity?

If a neighborhood is not 100% one ethnicity or another then it is diverse? Your argument is flat out wrong. It doesn't make sense.
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:14 AM
 
1,350 posts, read 2,364,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Do you realize what you're claiming? Of course no neighborhood is just of one race/ethnicity?

If a neighborhood is not 100% one ethnicity or another then it is diverse? Your argument is flat out wrong. It doesn't make sense.
Exactly this.

@NyWriterDude - no one is claiming there are neighborhoods consisting of entirely one race, so I'm not sure what you're trying to say.
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:18 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,579,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Do you realize what you're claiming? Of course no neighborhood is just of one race/ethnicity?

If a neighborhood is not 100% one ethnicity or another then it is diverse? Your argument is flat out wrong. It doesn't make sense.
But on the flip side, you claim that your own neighborhood is not diverse despite it having a good mix of ethnicities.

Your standards for what would make up a diverse neighborhood seem very stringent
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Bingo. And today no one is prohibited from living anywhere. I've recently met welfare whites who live in East New York, and Hispanics or Blacks who live in Chelsea.

True segregation is the state sanctioned segregation of the South where all people of a race where prohibited from being at a place or attending certain schools or having jobs because of their race.

That is not the case with contemporary NY at all. I feel the term segregation is abused. Of course discrimination occurs but this is NOTHING like the pre civil rights era (even the pre civil rights era in NYC).
Yeah and I think some people in this thread keep referring to Manhattan (South of 59th st) too much, even most white people probably couldn't afford to live there and the vast majority of NYC residents don't live there
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Old 10-01-2015, 12:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
But on the flip side, you claim that your own neighborhood is not diverse despite it having a good mix of ethnicities.

Your standards for what would make up a diverse neighborhood seem very stringent
Good mix of ethnicity in what sense? Having a 20% Asian/White population?

Not that I want it or care for it to be any different but the White/Asian population here has virtually no impact apart from living here.

I have a hard time believing it's even 20% White/Asian because I barely see any other White/Asians here apart from the Supers. The other White/Asian folks are probably just like me and my girlfriend. We leave at 7am and come back at 10pm (just to sleep). If we're not at work or at school we're in the City or in Brooklyn.
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