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Old 09-24-2015, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Bronx
16,030 posts, read 18,535,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
Also it is not uncommon in nYC for a neighborhood to have several groups but they basically don't interact at all. Take Parkchester in the Bronx for instance. The pakistanis/bengalis don't interact at all with the black and latino residents. Where I live now in Belmont there are Mexicans, a transient mostly white student population, a few dominicans and Pr, a few blacks, albanians, and a few old school italians here and there. While there is some interaction among some of the groups it is still pretty segregated in terms of how much the communities mingle.
This is very true. HIstocially at most you have 2 ethnic or racial groups in a neighborhood in NYC. Historically the most diverse neighborhood in NYC might have been Hells Kitchen which at one point was home to an Irish majority and large Italian, Puerto Rican minority and Eastern European minority. The only thing that everyone had in common was faith. Everyone was Catholic.
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Old 09-24-2015, 10:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
Also it is not uncommon in nYC for a neighborhood to have several groups but they basically don't interact at all. Take Parkchester in the Bronx for instance. The pakistanis/bengalis don't interact at all with the black and latino residents. Where I live now in Belmont there are Mexicans, a transient mostly white student population, a few dominicans and Pr, a few blacks, albanians, and a few old school italians here and there. While there is some interaction among some of the groups it is still pretty segregated in terms of how much the communities mingle.
That might be true but more so for immigrants
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Old 09-24-2015, 10:34 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
It seems to be a somewhat common opinion on here that NYC is segregated but I don't see how anyone can think that

Outside of Staten Island, most neighborhoods have sizeable populations of at least two (but usually more) racial/ethnic groups

And many neighborhoods are incredibly diverse
Because they are "NYC haters" and they are jealous.
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Old 09-24-2015, 10:45 AM
 
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Is Crown Heights considered diverse? On paper, maybe, but one group tends to live here, another lives over there. Washington Heights and Inwood also have a geographical divide (less stark perhaps, but still).

Then some neighborhoods may be diverse temporarily because they are "in transition" - one group is moving in or moving out... The process may continue for a long time, but the end result may not be one of diversity.
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Old 09-24-2015, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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The better question is how many neighborhoods are truly diverse in the full sense? Communities freely mingle, support each others businesses, etc. Kids come up together, etc. I'd like to hear some examples.
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Old 09-24-2015, 11:02 AM
 
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It's a combination of socioeconomics and consumer taste. Nobody tells people they have to anywhere any more. They just often prefer to live near others they have the most in common with.
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Old 09-24-2015, 01:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
The better question is how many neighborhoods are truly diverse in the full sense? Communities freely mingle, support each others businesses, etc. Kids come up together, etc. I'd like to hear some examples.
I'd say Ridgewood, Woodhaven, Forest Hills, Jamaica Hills, Briarwood and Woodside are all truly diverse neighborhoods with the exception of black people.
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Old 09-24-2015, 02:02 PM
 
Location: USA
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Unofficially, but it's not like that everywhere, especially manhattan.
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Old 09-24-2015, 02:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
That might be true but more so for immigrants
No, it is true everywhere in NYC.

How many of the Blacks living on the UES/Yorkville do you think get into our very best homes in that area? Obama, Al Roker and a few others with some sort of rock star status, but otherwise the further west you go towards the Park only minorities you see going into those buildings/homes are via the service door.

Same in parts of Staten Island. Blacks, Asians, Latino/Hispanics can buy a home say on the South Shore, Todt Hill or whatever, but that does not mean their neighbors will invite them over for cake and coffee. Oh they may be polite and say "good morning" or some such but that is far is it often goes.

While there is still a good share of working class/Archie Bunker type racism in NYC a bulk of it now is the more liberal/Democratic/progressive nonsense. That is "we don't discriminate based upon color or race; long as you are "like" us you are welcome". That means having the same sort of educational and social background along with career, money and so forth.

A AA co-worker has lived on the UES for over twenty years and one day a woman stopped her on the street. Now she has known this woman for ages but wasn't prepared for this query; the woman busted out with "do you know of a *girl* looking for work or are you looking to take on anyone new?" At first the Black woman didn't understand but it soon was made clear; the other woman assumed she was some sort of domestic help after all why else would she be on the UES?

The African-American co-worker went on to say she gets that sort of thing all the time ever since she moved on up so to speak. Persons working for this or that political campaign or even the candidates themselves from *both* parties ignore/pass over her when on the street pressing the flesh. She thinks it is because they assume she doesn't live on the UES (the domestic help thing again) and thus cannot vote so why bother. When she walks around the streets or avenues of UES by and large whites will not give way, she has to move around them, even young persons/children. Many barely acknowledge her presence but continue talking on their phones, between themselves or whatever.

Just read some of the comments about "affordable housing" in particular placing such families in luxury buildings and how NYC is "segregated" becomes clear. No one busts out with naming various races but there is a code.
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Old 09-24-2015, 06:33 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,471,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
No, it is true everywhere in NYC.

How many of the Blacks living on the UES/Yorkville do you think get into our very best homes in that area? Obama, Al Roker and a few others with some sort of rock star status, but otherwise the further west you go towards the Park only minorities you see going into those buildings/homes are via the service door.

Same in parts of Staten Island. Blacks, Asians, Latino/Hispanics can buy a home say on the South Shore, Todt Hill or whatever, but that does not mean their neighbors will invite them over for cake and coffee. Oh they may be polite and say "good morning" or some such but that is far is it often goes.

While there is still a good share of working class/Archie Bunker type racism in NYC a bulk of it now is the more liberal/Democratic/progressive nonsense. That is "we don't discriminate based upon color or race; long as you are "like" us you are welcome". That means having the same sort of educational and social background along with career, money and so forth.

A AA co-worker has lived on the UES for over twenty years and one day a woman stopped her on the street. Now she has known this woman for ages but wasn't prepared for this query; the woman busted out with "do you know of a *girl* looking for work or are you looking to take on anyone new?" At first the Black woman didn't understand but it soon was made clear; the other woman assumed she was some sort of domestic help after all why else would she be on the UES?

The African-American co-worker went on to say she gets that sort of thing all the time ever since she moved on up so to speak. Persons working for this or that political campaign or even the candidates themselves from *both* parties ignore/pass over her when on the street pressing the flesh. She thinks it is because they assume she doesn't live on the UES (the domestic help thing again) and thus cannot vote so why bother. When she walks around the streets or avenues of UES by and large whites will not give way, she has to move around them, even young persons/children. Many barely acknowledge her presence but continue talking on their phones, between themselves or whatever.

Just read some of the comments about "affordable housing" in particular placing such families in luxury buildings and how NYC is "segregated" becomes clear. No one busts out with naming various races but there is a code.
A few things

Staten Island is the worst example for NYC, it has less than 1/16th of NYC's population and is kind of isolated from the rest of the city

And someone who is truly liberal would not look down on a minority for being of a lower social class

And it is quite common for people who either grew up with other ethnic groups or at least interacts with them through schools, workplace, etc. to have diverse friend groups. That is definitely the case with me, and I live in Long Island, which has a reputation for being segregated. Long Island is relatively segregated but there are many exceptions and it's becoming less segregated.
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