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Old 09-24-2015, 06:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
Also it is not uncommon in nYC for a neighborhood to have several groups but they basically don't interact at all. Take Parkchester in the Bronx for instance. The pakistanis/bengalis don't interact at all with the black and latino residents. Where I live now in Belmont there are Mexicans, a transient mostly white student population, a few dominicans and Pr, a few blacks, albanians, and a few old school italians here and there. While there is some interaction among some of the groups it is still pretty segregated in terms of how much the communities mingle.
This depends on the layout of the neighborhood. I hang out in both the East and West Village and I notice plenty of social diversity amongst bar going-club going crowd. Ditto among students at universities.

Suburban style communities in parts of the outer boroughs may be different.

But as others noted the Blacks and Latinos belong to different groups, so it's not like they were all one group.
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Old 09-24-2015, 06:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
That might be true but more so for immigrants
Correct. More so for recent immigrants. A South Asian who can barely speak English cannot interact much with a LATINO who can't speak English.

Now if you're dealing with their children who grow up in the US, that may very well be a different story. Immigrants who have poor language skills of course want to be around their countrymen, but as these people learn English they do not limit themselves to ethnic neighborhoods.

A lot of Asians for example who moved up socioeconomically and attended good schools may live in Manhattan (and not Chinatown). Different population from Asians who can't speak English and are poorly educated.

Pretty much anyone who can afford to wants to live in or near Manhattan. This is people of all races and if you have the money you will find ways to make it work. No money then it's bye bye.

The true color of NYC is green.
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Old 09-24-2015, 07:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
This depends on the layout of the neighborhood. I hang out in both the East and West Village and I notice plenty of social diversity amongst bar going-club going crowd. Ditto among students at universities.

Suburban style communities in parts of the outer boroughs may be different.

But as others noted the Blacks and Latinos belong to different groups, so it's not like they were all one group.
I agree with you there, I've seen that myself

I agree with you on that too, it seems like the suburban areas are more likely to be segregated than urban ones (the largely black communities in Southeast Queens, the largely white communities throughout Staten Island, etc.)

And yeah of course, Puerto Ricans are racially and culturally different from Mexicans, for instance
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Old 09-24-2015, 07:53 PM
 
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https://www.lewrockwell.com/2010/11/...negadehistory/

This article talks about how mafia owned nightclubs have done a lot of integration/race relations and for gay rights. The nightlife has historically been owned by organized crime but they provided places for diverse groups of people to interact with each other, do business with each other, date or marry each other, etc.

Suburban style spaces which often do not like nightclubs or places around have far fewer opportunities for people from different backgrounds to meet each other.
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Old 09-25-2015, 01:02 PM
 
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Valley Stream NY is closest town in NYC area to the % breakdown of race in the USA. It has near perfect mix, white, Asian, black Spanish etc.
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Old 09-25-2015, 01:07 PM
 
Location: USA
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I only deal with people who are not prejudice. The rest of ya can jump off a cliff.
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Old 09-25-2015, 11:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNYC View Post
DIVERSE when money is flowing into businesses. After 5pm people go back to their respective ethnic groups.
This.
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Old 09-26-2015, 11:30 AM
 
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Some of the responses here clearly show me that either people don't get out much to other parts of NYC (which is true even for many native NYC'ers) or have a skewed definition of diversity.

It's akin to claiming that one gets their daily serving of fruits by drinking sugar laden Juice.

I'll keep on posting this graph:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...-map.html?_r=0

Zoom out to where the entirety of NYC can be seen. The big picture view is much more important in this case. This is raw data, it doesn't lie.
If the City was truly diverse we wouldn't have HUGE clusters of blue, orange, red, and green dots.

As a few others have pointed out, some neighborhood are only "diverse" because they're going through periods of transition. Some old white folks who are in the neighborhood from a few decades back does not make it diverse.
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Old 09-26-2015, 12:55 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Some of the responses here clearly show me that either people don't get out much to other parts of NYC (which is true even for many native NYC'ers) or have a skewed definition of diversity.

It's akin to claiming that one gets their daily serving of fruits by drinking sugar laden Juice.

I'll keep on posting this graph:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...-map.html?_r=0

Zoom out to where the entirety of NYC can be seen. The big picture view is much more important in this case. This is raw data, it doesn't lie.
If the City was truly diverse we wouldn't have HUGE clusters of blue, orange, red, and green dots.

As a few others have pointed out, some neighborhood are only "diverse" because they're going through periods of transition. Some old white folks who are in the neighborhood from a few decades back does not make it diverse.
The neighborhoods in transition are diverse and anyone who can afford to or wants to stay in said neighborhoods can.

What basically happens in those cases is that not everyone can fit into Manhattan below 59th Street so a lot of people have no choice but to move uptown or to places like Jackson Heights or Bedstuy.

But parts of Manhattan that are completely gentrified still remain diverse. Believe it or not some non whites have money and can live in nice places. The poor ones in public housing are not displaced by gentrification.
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Old 09-26-2015, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,779 posts, read 17,397,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Some of the responses here clearly show me that either people don't get out much to other parts of NYC (which is true even for many native NYC'ers) or have a skewed definition of diversity.

It's akin to claiming that one gets their daily serving of fruits by drinking sugar laden Juice.

I'll keep on posting this graph:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...-map.html?_r=0

Zoom out to where the entirety of NYC can be seen. The big picture view is much more important in this case. This is raw data, it doesn't lie.
If the City was truly diverse we wouldn't have HUGE clusters of blue, orange, red, and green dots.

As a few others have pointed out, some neighborhood are only "diverse" because they're going through periods of transition. Some old white folks who are in the neighborhood from a few decades back does not make it diverse.
Could be borderline areas are probably diverse.
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