U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-26-2015, 01:09 PM
 
3,327 posts, read 3,487,061 times
Reputation: 2843

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
The neighborhoods in transition are diverse and anyone who can afford to or wants to stay in said neighborhoods can.

What basically happens in those cases is that not everyone can fit into Manhattan below 59th Street so a lot of people have no choice but to move uptown or to places like Jackson Heights or Bedstuy.

But parts of Manhattan that are completely gentrified still remain diverse. Believe it or not some non whites have money and can live in nice places. The poor ones in public housing are not displaced by gentrification.
You're wrong. Flat out.

Of course there are non Whites/Asians that can afford to live in Manhattan. However, they are so few in numbers that they are statistically insignificant. My family and I joke that when tourists come to NYC, they must fly away believing that NYC is 90% White beause the only minorities they see in Manhattan are those working in retail.

If you remove the populations of the projects/rent controlled tenants in Manhattan, the White population would easily top 85%. That's what's slowly happening anyway.

Those living in Jackson Heights or Bed Stuy aren't there because there's no room Manhattan below 59th. That's laughable. They're there because they can't afford it. It's not between Bed-Stuy and Manhattan for them. It's between Bed-Stuy or another cheaper but inaccessible (vis-a-vis public transportation) place in Brooklyn or Queens.

I grew up in this City and going on my 30th year now. NYC neighborhoods were always heavily segregated as far as I could remember. The city as a whole is a melting pot because of it's relatively small size (high density) but the neighborhoods themselves are not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-26-2015, 03:33 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,504,597 times
Reputation: 6083
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
You're wrong. Flat out.

Of course there are non Whites/Asians that can afford to live in Manhattan. However, they are so few in numbers that they are statistically insignificant. My family and I joke that when tourists come to NYC, they must fly away believing that NYC is 90% White beause the only minorities they see in Manhattan are those working in retail.

If you remove the populations of the projects/rent controlled tenants in Manhattan, the White population would easily top 85%. That's what's slowly happening anyway.

Those living in Jackson Heights or Bed Stuy aren't there because there's no room Manhattan below 59th. That's laughable. They're there because they can't afford it. It's not between Bed-Stuy and Manhattan for them. It's between Bed-Stuy or another cheaper but inaccessible (vis-a-vis public transportation) place in Brooklyn or Queens.

I grew up in this City and going on my 30th year now. NYC neighborhoods were always heavily segregated as far as I could remember. The city as a whole is a melting pot because of it's relatively small size (high density) but the neighborhoods themselves are not.
Well that's a dumb joke because I see plenty of diversity in Midtown and Lower Manhattan

Granted, most of the minorities don't live there but then again neither do most of the white people

And that map you keep posting does not prove your point, there are areas which seem pretty segregated but many, likely the majority, would reveal a good mix of ethnicities in a given area whether or not that area is "in transition"

Any area with a sizeable population of at least two, especially three ethnic groups is diverse

Woodhaven, Briarwood, Bayside, Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Kensington, Coney Island, and many other neighborhoods definitely fit the definition of diverse
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:03 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,885 posts, read 8,190,142 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post

I grew up in this City and going on my 30th year now. NYC neighborhoods were always heavily segregated as far as I could remember. The city as a whole is a melting pot because of it's relatively small size (high density) but the neighborhoods themselves are not.
Agree, same experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:06 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,885 posts, read 8,190,142 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Well that's a dumb joke because I see plenty of diversity in Midtown and Lower Manhattan

Granted, most of the minorities don't live there but then again neither do most of the white people
Is it the case that you have no idea what this thread is about ?

Hint: It's not about tourists or people "diversifying" an area because they work there and appear for the moment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Glendale NY
4,841 posts, read 8,202,980 times
Reputation: 3523
"Segregated" neighborhoods are more interesting, and are also a lot more tight knit then so called "diverse" neighborhoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:19 PM
 
20,562 posts, read 13,584,770 times
Reputation: 14205
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoomDan515 View Post
"Segregated" neighborhoods are more interesting, and are also a lot more tight knit then so called "diverse" neighborhoods.
Yeah, gotta know who has extra pitchforks in case of an emergency.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:35 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,885 posts, read 8,190,142 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Yeah, gotta know who has extra pitchforks in case of an emergency.....
Well ... how not ?
A euphemism but true enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:40 PM
 
24,069 posts, read 17,474,477 times
Reputation: 9125
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
You're wrong. Flat out.

Of course there are non Whites/Asians that can afford to live in Manhattan. However, they are so few in numbers that they are statistically insignificant. My family and I joke that when tourists come to NYC, they must fly away believing that NYC is 90% White beause the only minorities they see in Manhattan are those working in retail.

If you remove the populations of the projects/rent controlled tenants in Manhattan, the White population would easily top 85%. That's what's slowly happening anyway.

Those living in Jackson Heights or Bed Stuy aren't there because there's no room Manhattan below 59th. That's laughable. They're there because they can't afford it. It's not between Bed-Stuy and Manhattan for them. It's between Bed-Stuy or another cheaper but inaccessible (vis-a-vis public transportation) place in Brooklyn or Queens.

I grew up in this City and going on my 30th year now. NYC neighborhoods were always heavily segregated as far as I could remember. The city as a whole is a melting pot because of it's relatively small size (high density) but the neighborhoods themselves are not.
The map you provided showed decent numbers of Blacks and Hispanics in the Lower East Side and Hells a Kitchen. Blacks are supposed to be 12 of the national population. A census track in midtown east was 3 percent black. That is statistically significant and a number of tracks in Manhattan below 59 th street showed statistically significant percentages of Blacks and Hispanics. Lower Manhattan is so expensive because a lot of people are bidding for a small supply of housing. In short there isn't much room for new housing ( and zoning regulations prevent much talk new housing).

Those people moving to JH and BS are moving there because there isn't enough room for them in lower Manhattan. The lack of space and high demand as made prices go through the roof.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:45 PM
 
24,069 posts, read 17,474,477 times
Reputation: 9125
I think this thread is full of unattractive people with poor social skills. Minorities are very active participants of the life of lower Manhattan. Do you ever go to social places like restaurants, bars, etc? The gyms, stores, etc?

Living in a neighborhood does not restrict your social life to said neighborhood. Anyone who can afford lower Manhattan can live there if they want to. It isn't segregation!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-26-2015, 06:51 PM
 
24,069 posts, read 17,474,477 times
Reputation: 9125
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Well that's a dumb joke because I see plenty of diversity in Midtown and Lower Manhattan

Granted, most of the minorities don't live there but then again neither do most of the white people

And that map you keep posting does not prove your point, there are areas which seem pretty segregated but many, likely the majority, would reveal a good mix of ethnicities in a given area whether or not that area is "in transition"

Any area with a sizeable population of at least two, especially three ethnic groups is diverse

Woodhaven, Briarwood, Bayside, Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Kensington, Coney Island, and many other neighborhoods definitely fit the definition of diverse
None of those neighborhoods were entirely of a certain group. NYC is segregated by socioeconomic a not a race. A white person on welfare will have to move the Bronx. A Hispanic person with enough money can buy in Midtown.

Person making 50k or so will have to consider neighborhoods like Jackson Heights or Bedstuy regardless of race because that is where they can afford to live.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top