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Old 09-27-2015, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Queens, NY
436 posts, read 410,120 times
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I think we're all well-aware of how the city has changed during the Bloomberg years for those not fortunate enough to have a large income. Was he a net-positive for the two groups cited in the topic title, or are they worse off than before?
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Old 09-27-2015, 09:47 AM
 
791 posts, read 1,211,128 times
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Worse off by far. He is not the worst guy in the world (certainly not evil hearted like Drool-iani) but when it comes to ordinary folk, he just doesn't get it.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:27 AM
 
544 posts, read 1,313,674 times
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What he did to improve the lifestyle (so to speak) of NYers, such as those targeted at health and exercise, certainly benefits more of the people you refer to than the more wealthy.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:42 AM
 
1,417 posts, read 1,697,464 times
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Bloomberg presided over the transition of the city from a place with a strong working class heritage, to a playground for wealthy elites. As a construction worker I can say that we had tons of work...and everyone had long commutes because the city was too expensive. I remained in the 5 boros and am viewed by co workers as an eccentric.
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Old 09-27-2015, 01:59 PM
 
23,254 posts, read 16,063,944 times
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City services like 311 was created by Bloomberg. He used technology to improve city services.

Gentrification and the expansion of national chains gave New Yorkers better shopping and food options.
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Old 09-27-2015, 02:41 PM
 
8,218 posts, read 8,501,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacier Azure View Post
I think we're all well-aware of how the city has changed during the Bloomberg years for those not fortunate enough to have a large income. Was he a net-positive for the two groups cited in the topic title, or are they worse off than before?


I think worse off, definitely - however, as much as I came to dislike Bloomberg, that can't all be blamed on him. Obviously, the problems were national.

Can't help but wonder, though, if NYWriterDude has any idea how incompetent 311 is overall, and how it has actively hindered citizens from reaching the right people.

(And now that I think of it, please note my reasonable response, despite my dislike - unlike the people who hate DeBlasio, who seem beyond reason.)
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:10 PM
 
23,254 posts, read 16,063,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
I think worse off, definitely - however, as much as I came to dislike Bloomberg, that can't all be blamed on him. Obviously, the problems were national.

Can't help but wonder, though, if NYWriterDude has any idea how incompetent 311 is overall, and how it has actively hindered citizens from reaching the right people.

(And now that I think of it, please note my reasonable response, despite my dislike - unlike the people who hate DeBlasio, who seem beyond reason.)
I have used 311 many times and it was much easier than looking up whatever number from the white pages.

It never hindered me from reaching the right people and overall it has been pretty popular.

The city has budget surpluses because of Bloomberg. Bloomberg got more diverse corporate investment in the city.

The city's educational institutions expanded quite a bit in the Bloomberg era.
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:27 PM
 
9,955 posts, read 8,445,983 times
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Bloomberg certainly didn't do anything to slow down the increasing COL in NYC, but he wasn't the cause of it.

There had been factors that had been preventing wholesale gentrification in the city for a few decades before the end of the twentieth century. Think in terms of the collapse of the industrial economy in the city, the 70s financial crisis, the rampant crime, the rent laws, etc.. Through the 90s, these were all in one way or another dealt with. By the time Bloomberg got into office, NYC had become a highly desirable place to live, and for demographic groups for whom it really hadn't been previously (think we'll of parents with children.) So the working class just had more and richer competition for city resources, and they couldn't, and still can't compete.

Bloomberg didn't do anything to change that situation, was happy to let it continue, and did everything possible to help it along. But, of course, this was the proper thing for him to do.
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:32 PM
 
8,218 posts, read 8,501,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I have used 311 many times and it was much easier than looking up whatever number from the white pages.

It never hindered me from reaching the right people and overall it has been pretty popular.

The city has budget surpluses because of Bloomberg. Bloomberg got more diverse corporate investment in the city. The city's educational institutions expanded quite a bit in the Bloomberg era.

You're so funny. The reason 311 was easier is because with the advent of 311, the telephone directory stopped printing city government numbers. The telephone directory used to have much more information than they provide to 311.

Maybe you ask them simple questions, so you haven't had problems. Some day when you have nothing better to do, ask them something like, "What number in the Department of Buildings should I call to ask about the requirements for buzzers and intercoms?" or "Where should I call in the Finance department to get an overview of the rebates available for co-ops and condos?" 311 is great for people who know nothing about NYC and have only the most basic issues, like filing a no-heat complaint.
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Old 09-27-2015, 04:02 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,886 posts, read 7,827,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post

Maybe you ask them simple questions, so you haven't had problems. Some day when you have nothing better to do, ask them something like, "What number in the Department of Buildings should I call to ask about the requirements for buzzers and intercoms?" or "Where should I call in the Finance department to get an overview of the rebates available for co-ops and condos?" 311 is great for people who know nothing about NYC and have only the most basic issues, like filing a no-heat complaint.
Agree, as do many people.
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