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Old 10-07-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Ridgewood, NY
3,039 posts, read 5,735,093 times
Reputation: 1566

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightRabbit View Post
Sure, if you wait for the usual market forces, it could be years or never for ENY to change noticeably.

But the current city administration now seems to be making a huge deal over ENY.

I can't compare histories, but look what happened when Lincoln Center came into being. It was like an unstoppable force of nature. Those times won't be repeated, of course, but sometimes there are focal points on specific neighborhoods, with a lot of political will to change them. Those things happen faster.

I don't know tons here, just that there have been many city-sponsored public meetings about the Broadway Junction station, rezoning, affordable housing newbuilds, making Atlantic Ave a rejuvenated "industrial corridor" to create trade jobs for nearby residents to have a middleclass life, and more. Commutes to office jobs in downtown Brooklyn offices would be very doable using existing train lines.
I'll agree in part that there's been a lot of buzz about ENY recently, but it's more about building affordable housing for the local population. Now again, that's what is being said but on paper, this plan is really about establishing a location for affordable housing in the city.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/poli...icle-1.2384959

"The plan also includes a new school and improvements to parks and streets. But it has already drawn criticism from some activists who say many people who live there won’t be able to afford the new apartments and residents who fear new development will usher in gentrification.

De Blasio stressed that 80% of the affordable apartments will be set aside for families making no more than $46,000 a year."


https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/201...-east-new-york


"East New York is the first neighborhood targeted for rezoning under de Blasio's plan to create or preserve 200,000 units of affordable housing over a decade. There will be at least 1,200 units over the next few years in East New York, mostly for families making no more than $46,000 per year.
But the fear from some in the neighborhood is that the new development, including buildings of at least 8 stories on Pitkin Avenue and other corridors, will change the face of the neighborhood, draw in people with higher incomes, and displace long-time residents of moderate and lower incomes.
De Blasio told the crowd that wasn't going to happen.
"I’m just not going to watch while hard working...people are displaced. I don’t find that acceptable at all. Our city government can ensure that working people have a place to live in their own neighborhoods," said the mayor.
"We have to make sure that, even when things are changing, hardworking people are protected," he added."
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Old 10-07-2015, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY (Crown Heights/Weeksville)
996 posts, read 944,451 times
Reputation: 1091
From the plan: "Ensure at least 50% of new housing built is affordable to low- and moderate-income residents."

Who's the market for the other ~50% of new housing builds?

"...criticism from some activists who say many people who live there won’t be able to afford the new apartments and residents who fear new development will usher in gentrification."

To me, the critics are off-base here. Everyone doesn't have to afford every apartment in a neighborhood, as long as there's enough supply at every income level not to displace current residents. Change is always threatening, but this sounds like change that will benefit current residents. There's language in the plan that protects the very lowest income housing in place now.

The criticism I'm also sympathetic to is from people who want to ensure more housing for the middle-class, above the levels of $46K / Affordable Housing, in ENY.

So..to me, it's crucial to know: is that other ~50% of new housing builds aimed for the middle class or the wealthy? Huge wealth gaps living in close proximity is just heartache, Manhattan style. Brooklyn should do something different.

Last edited by BrightRabbit; 10-07-2015 at 04:09 PM..
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Old 10-07-2015, 04:05 PM
 
60 posts, read 44,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anon1 View Post

"We have to make sure that, even when things are changing, hardworking people are protected," he added."
Just realized the importance of reading between the lines....wow
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Old 10-07-2015, 08:08 PM
 
18,288 posts, read 11,673,706 times
Reputation: 11936
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightRabbit View Post
Sure, if you wait for the usual market forces, it could be years or never for ENY to change noticeably.

But the current city administration now seems to be making a huge deal over ENY.

I can't compare histories, but look what happened when Lincoln Center came into being. It was like an unstoppable force of nature. Those times won't be repeated, of course, but sometimes there are focal points on specific neighborhoods, with a lot of political will to change them. Those things happen faster.

I don't know tons here, just that there have been many city-sponsored public meetings about the Broadway Junction station, rezoning, affordable housing newbuilds, making Atlantic Ave a rejuvenated "industrial corridor" to create trade jobs for nearby residents to have a middleclass life, and more. Commutes to office jobs in downtown Brooklyn offices would be very doable using existing train lines.

Lincoln Center area was different. The creation of that space was more about picking low hanging fruit to create a new arts center area for Manhattan than anything else. It just so happened urban renewal/slum clearance was in full swing and once Robert Moses was brought on board the fate of that area was sealed.

An Urban Journey From Slum to Cultural Acropolis - NYTimes.com

Lincoln Square and San Juan Hill (as the area was then called/known) did have its share of violence (mostly between the Blacks of San Juan Hill area between the Italians to the north and Irish to the south (a la West Side Story), but it was also a rich and vibrant neighborhood.

Sad thing was that the poor, working and middle class residents (mostly white but other races as well with San Juan Hill being mostly blacks) along with businesses were no match for the high toned ideals of slum clearance. The City decided it needed a cultural arts center that was compact and easily accessible to whites from the suburbs via highways or transit. In short order the area was condemned and that was that: American Civilization: From the Slum to the Center: Robert Moses and the Creation of Lincoln Center

https://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.c...incoln-center/

Ironically it is because of Lincoln Square, Upper West Side slum clearance district, and several others you won't see any vast and or huge change in East New York anytime soon if ever. Urban renewal developed a very bad name after Robert Moses got through with it and communities learned how to fight back against it.

Bill de Boob and rezone all of ENY that he likes, but those living there aren't going to move of their own accord without a fight. That means the area will largely remain what it is for decade or decades to come.

Last edited by BugsyPal; 10-07-2015 at 08:23 PM..
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Old 10-07-2015, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Glendale NY
4,841 posts, read 7,864,784 times
Reputation: 3503
The area south of Linden Blvd has been building up a lot lately.
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Old 10-09-2015, 06:19 AM
 
60 posts, read 44,452 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoomDan515 View Post
The area south of Linden Blvd has been building up a lot lately.
Yes alot going on there, even a new out door mall, but wouldn't the lack of good public transportation pose a problem for that area ??
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Old 10-09-2015, 09:51 AM
 
23,262 posts, read 16,076,440 times
Reputation: 8543
De Blasio talks about putting thousands of apartments for affordable housing in East New York, and he has put more money for welfare for homeless people. Where do you think they are going to go?

To East New York, Brownsville, and neighboring parts of Brooklyn.

Translation East New York is still a dumping ground for the city and it isn't getting better and there is totally no danger of gentrification. Any whites moving in are probably welfare whites and junkies. Just because white people show up in an area does not mean that they are well off. Whites can be poor too.
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Old 10-09-2015, 04:32 PM
 
1,007 posts, read 581,169 times
Reputation: 861
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
De Blasio talks about putting thousands of apartments for affordable housing in East New York, and he has put more money for welfare for homeless people. Where do you think they are going to go?

To East New York, Brownsville, and neighboring parts of Brooklyn.

Translation East New York is still a dumping ground for the city and it isn't getting better and there is totally no danger of gentrification. Any whites moving in are probably welfare whites and junkies. Just because white people show up in an area does not mean that they are well off. Whites can be poor too.
Rents in ENY are now way higher than most areas of the bronx, and rival Queens or Harlem. Just look at the rebranding of Starret City as "Spring Creek Towers" they have been raising rent indefinately for the past five years at a rate of almost 5% a year! ! bedrooms are now almost $1300! and thats a subsidized housing complex
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Old 10-09-2015, 05:02 PM
 
1,957 posts, read 1,047,639 times
Reputation: 768
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
De Blasio talks about putting thousands of apartments for affordable housing in East New York, and he has put more money for welfare for homeless people. Where do you think they are going to go?

To East New York, Brownsville, and neighboring parts of Brooklyn.

Translation East New York is still a dumping ground for the city and it isn't getting better and there is totally no danger of gentrification. Any whites moving in are probably welfare whites and junkies. Just because white people show up in an area does not mean that they are well off. Whites can be poor too.
Yes, just because affordable housing is being built in an area does not mean gentrification.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoogeyDownDweller View Post
Rents in ENY are now way higher than most areas of the bronx, and rival Queens or Harlem. Just look at the rebranding of Starret City as "Spring Creek Towers" they have been raising rent indefinately for the past five years at a rate of almost 5% a year! ! bedrooms are now almost $1300! and thats a subsidized housing complex
Rents always go up. Whether they will go down is just debatable. Gentrifier type people will not go to these areas because they are too far out, a much longer commute from core areas of the city, and these areas have less to offer in terms of almost everything. I honestly think its impossible for a place like NYC to completely gentrify.
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Old 10-10-2015, 09:44 AM
 
60 posts, read 44,452 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
De Blasio talks about putting thousands of apartments for affordable housing in East New York, and he has put more money for welfare for homeless people. Where do you think they are going to go?

To East New York, Brownsville, and neighboring parts of Brooklyn.

Translation East New York is still a dumping ground for the city and it isn't getting better and there is totally no danger of gentrification. Any whites moving in are probably welfare whites and junkies. Just because white people show up in an area does not mean that they are well off. Whites can be poor too.


There are times where i think that it can go this way ( and it may very well be going this way) but when i see posts like this i dont know what to think any more ....

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/11/re...pace.html?_r=0
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