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Old 10-10-2015, 04:02 PM
 
23,253 posts, read 16,063,944 times
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http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/11/ny...plan.html?_r=0

So De Blasio is contributing 2.5 billion dollars of city funds to the MTA, while Albany contributes 8.3 billion. The money will be spent on system upgrades, new signals, CBTC (automation of the other subway lines like the L is automated and the 7 and Queens Blvd line are being automated), new trains and buses, Metro North to Penn Station, LIRR to Grand Central, and yes this FUNDS Phase 2 of the Second Avenue subway (extension of Second Avenue Subway to 125th Street and Lexington Avene) as well as the engineering study for phases 3-4 of the Second Avenue subway (the extensions downtown).
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Old 10-10-2015, 05:44 PM
 
18,260 posts, read 11,663,507 times
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Mayor de Boob got school by the union (TWU) who got a nice new contract agreement out of Cuomo and began turning up their heat on Mr. Mayor.

New York City Raises Offer to MTA to Over $2 Billion - WSJ

Unlike previous years when the City could legitimately cry poor mouth, NYC is swimming in money with a vast budget surplus. Mayor de Boob and the City Council have no problem doling out funds to their liberal/progressive causes and supporters but something as fundamental and important as mass transit....

As for de Boob's demands that the City have more control over New York City Transit in return for upping its contribution is the man totally ignorant of past history? The City *HAD* control of the mass transit system and couldn't manage it fiscally any better than the private companies it pushed out. Almost 100% of the improvements you see in the system are the results of MTA capital spending including issuing millions of dollars in debt. Yes the City is flush with cash now but what happens in future if that changes? NYC lobs NYCT back to the state?
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Old 10-10-2015, 05:48 PM
 
4,149 posts, read 3,445,371 times
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look. who cares about the politics. i'm glad it's happening. the east side depends way too much on solely lexington avenue
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Old 10-10-2015, 06:14 PM
 
23,253 posts, read 16,063,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Mayor de Boob got school by the union (TWU) who got a nice new contract agreement out of Cuomo and began turning up their heat on Mr. Mayor.

New York City Raises Offer to MTA to Over $2 Billion - WSJ

Unlike previous years when the City could legitimately cry poor mouth, NYC is swimming in money with a vast budget surplus. Mayor de Boob and the City Council have no problem doling out funds to their liberal/progressive causes and supporters but something as fundamental and important as mass transit....

As for de Boob's demands that the City have more control over New York City Transit in return for upping its contribution is the man totally ignorant of past history? The City *HAD* control of the mass transit system and couldn't manage it fiscally any better than the private companies it pushed out. Almost 100% of the improvements you see in the system are the results of MTA capital spending including issuing millions of dollars in debt. Yes the City is flush with cash now but what happens in future if that changes? NYC lobs NYCT back to the state?
They were hoping to pass the responsibility onto the federal government and Albany. And though the feds and the states could certainly fund more (the federal government and the Port Authority and NY and NJ have agreed to build a new Amtrak tunnel from NJ to NY) with the city government flush with money from business and real estate taxes there is no way the city could get out of it's responsibilities in funding transit infrastructure. De Blasio should have done this from the beginning. How does he think the working class people get around in NYC? And since it is NYC transit, the city and the mayor have a certain amount of responsibility for it's improvements.

After there was an accident in the G train due to decayed infrastructure, the MTA head and the unions slammed it on de Blasio. He could not be seen as letting NYC Transit crumble when the city is flooded with cash and when demands on the transit system are growing. So he had no choice but to give in. In a way this picks off of Bloomberg's work. Bloomberg had the city fund the first new subway station since 1950 (34th Street-Hudson Yards) and it is being paid for by the real estate taxes on the rapidly developing West Side.
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Old 10-10-2015, 06:23 PM
 
18,260 posts, read 11,663,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
They were hoping to pass the responsibility onto the federal government and Albany. And though the feds and the states could certainly fund more (the federal government and the Port Authority and NY and NJ have agreed to build a new Amtrak tunnel from NJ to NY) with the city government flush with money from business and real estate taxes there is no way the city could get out of it's responsibilities in funding transit infrastructure. De Blasio should have done this from the beginning. How does he think the working class people get around in NYC? And since it is NYC transit, the city and the mayor have a certain amount of responsibility for it's improvements.

After there was an accident in the G train due to decayed infrastructure, the MTA head and the unions slammed it on de Blasio. He could not be seen as letting NYC Transit crumble when the city is flooded with cash and when demands on the transit system are growing. So he had no choice but to give in. In a way this picks off of Bloomberg's work. Bloomberg had the city fund the first new subway station since 1950 (34th Street-Hudson Yards) and it is being paid for by the real estate taxes on the rapidly developing West Side.

There has been no final agreement on funding for the new Hudson River rail tunnel project. The Obama administration is attempting to fast track the initial work (environmental review, etc...) but the federal government nor anyone else has backed any concrete fiscal plan. Officials Want to Accelerate New Hudson River Tunnel Plans - Transportation Watch - Curbed NY

USDOT To Streamline $20B Hudson River Tunnel Project - Law360

Obama waited a bit late in the game to wake-up and push this legacy infrastructure project. He and by extension the current transportation secretary will be gone in a little over a year. In 2016 a new POTUS and Congress will be elected and there are no promises one or both will be in favor of giving the ten billion or more that would pay for half this project. That is the number Christie and Cuomo are aiming to get.

This being NY and NJ along with recent grand infrastructure project history such as the Big Dig tells us that what is predicted to cost 20 billion now will probably end up one-half or even twice that amount when all is said and done.
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Old 10-10-2015, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
1,073 posts, read 494,149 times
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It's about time they strike a compromise. I'm hoping the signals upgrade will provide tangible benefits in the near future because I hate coming from work and being stuck on overcrowded 4/5 trains.
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Old 10-10-2015, 07:08 PM
 
2,178 posts, read 1,722,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bullandre View Post
It's about time they strike a compromise. I'm hoping the signals upgrade will provide tangible benefits in the near future because I hate coming from work and being stuck on overcrowded 4/5 trains.
Your best bet would be to hope that the SAS gets opened asap. The Lex isn't receiving CBTC anytime soon.
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Old 10-11-2015, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,143 posts, read 26,425,454 times
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Grateful for Phase 2, but I doubt I will live to ride it up to ALDI's (117th.) Figure 20 years?

But I pray that increased concentration on Phase 2 doesn't do anything to slow down Phase 1.
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Old 10-11-2015, 12:39 PM
 
23,253 posts, read 16,063,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
Grateful for Phase 2, but I doubt I will live to ride it up to ALDI's (117th.) Figure 20 years?

But I pray that increased concentration on Phase 2 doesn't do anything to slow down Phase 1.
Phase 1 is nearly done and on schedule to open up end of next year. For Phase 2 they have to do complete the new engineering study BEFORE they actually do the construction work. Actually this not only funds Phase 2, but does the engineering studies for phases 3-4. But it will likely take another 5 years before the MTA capital budget can ask for funding for phases 3-4.

So of course none of this slows done the almost DONE, fully funded phase 1.
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Old 10-11-2015, 04:53 PM
 
6,909 posts, read 9,034,068 times
Reputation: 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
There has been no final agreement on funding for the new Hudson River rail tunnel project. The Obama administration is attempting to fast track the initial work (environmental review, etc...) but the federal government nor anyone else has backed any concrete fiscal plan. Officials Want to Accelerate New Hudson River Tunnel Plans - Transportation Watch - Curbed NY

USDOT To Streamline $20B Hudson River Tunnel Project - Law360

Obama waited a bit late in the game to wake-up and push this legacy infrastructure project. He and by extension the current transportation secretary will be gone in a little over a year. In 2016 a new POTUS and Congress will be elected and there are no promises one or both will be in favor of giving the ten billion or more that would pay for half this project. That is the number Christie and Cuomo are aiming to get.

This being NY and NJ along with recent grand infrastructure project history such as the Big Dig tells us that what is predicted to cost 20 billion now will probably end up one-half or even twice that amount when all is said and done.
My recommendation would be to simply not fund it and let it die. It does not look like people want it badly enough, most especially New Yorkers. When the TZ Bridge is upgraded, commuters can just bus from across the Hudson and catch the Metro North in Tarrytown.
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