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Old 10-12-2015, 10:09 AM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,886 posts, read 7,839,277 times
Reputation: 3000

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TSopp77 View Post
they are savages that is why most of them are poor. It's not politicians it's not bankers telling them to **** on the elevator and speak like an idiot.
Right ....
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:20 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,104,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
It's not a joke.

The picture shown is Isaac Homes and Holmes Towers on First Avenue between 91st and 95th Street, Yorkville, UES.
I doubt that the residents have benefitted by the opening of Whole Foods, Fairway, Starbucks, and bank branches all over the neighborhood, the typical amenities of gentrification.

Closing a Dollar Store to open a Starbucks is NOT an improvement for the poor and elderly (Stanley Isaac Houses is largely senior citizens...even houses a senior center.)
Wonderful pizzeria with $8 lasagna large enough to feed 3 adults across the street (at 94th) was driven out of business.

The thriving business next door is a new children's Fencing Academy for little Tiffany, Throckmorton and their tiny, rich friends. Never saw any senior grannies wielding their epées. (not many black kids either.)
The worst poor neighborhoods historically often did not have grocery stores at all, and residents had to eat crappy food in bodegas that cost far more than Whole Foods.

So yes poor people do benefit from Whole Foods and Fairway opening up in their neighborhoods as they have better food options. These grocery stores do take food stamps.

And believe it or not poor people in housing projects have jobs, so they can walk to Fairways, Whole Foods, Starbucks, and bank branches and apply for and receive work there. Many poor people in housing projects work in retail or grocery stores.
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:31 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,104,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
This past couple of days I have been watching and reading articles about gentrification in legacy cities such as NYC, DC and SF. This is another article that speaks the truth about the current situation of inequality in NYC.

First off I want to say is that gentrification in NYC only benefits a certain number of people. If one does not have a college degree from a 4 year university, has a business or does not own a property and located in immediate areas of the city, these folks will have problems to maintain their lively hoods in such areas. Folks wont be able to compete against the new comers, and face the wrath of being priced out or being marginalized by those with higher income.

I often find it amazing how gentrification can hug and circumnavigate around the housing projects, creating a tale of two cities scenario. Property across the street from housing projects are cheaper forcing landlords to sell for a quick buck or two. But the most important of these that are in inner city gentrifying neighborhoods where property is more desirable around or near housing projects for folks or businesses to buy into. NYCHA residents do not earn enough money to enjoy the spoils of gentrification. They also do not have the academic, and skills to obtain certain jobs that the gentry are employed in. If lucky enough NYCHA residents may enjoy benefits of new establishments and to a certain degree safer streets outside of the housing projects.

Big problem for NYCHA residents will be food, how can they shop for food in gentry neighborhoods if low income and affordable super markets vanish? Along with the rising costs of certain services who do not like to cater to NYCHA residents to fear of safety and lack of money of residents.

The big problem for the gentry will still be crime to a certain degree, but also public schools which are mainly attended by children who live in NYCHA. The gentry may support a magnet or charter school built in their neighborhoods, if not private school or move back to suburbia.

I don't know what the city wants to do with NYCHA, if its going to be served for housing for the affordable, low income. What NYCHA needs to do is pay those with adequate incomes and that still reside in NYCHA to leave via a buyout of $5000. Or if the city wants to improve NYCHA, projects in gentry neighborhoods should be sold off and converted into first time homeowners or coops.

Overall this study shows that a tale of two cities exist and is not going anywhere anytime soon. The study is also a waste of money and could have been done easily and cheaply by interviewing NYCHA residents willing to volunteer. Or by using a CUNY school to allow a class to have a case study on the basis of gentrification around the housing projects.

The next mayor of NYC needs to do something face or come up with an idea that can help out the average, but at the same time not scaring the crap out of fiscal conservatives that live in Manhattan and two-faced apologetic liberals that live in Manhattan and immediate areas of Western Queens, Upper Manhattan, Western Brooklyn, Southern tip of the South Bronx. The city needs to find a way on how to create talent for its locals from academics to athletics and everything inbetween instead of attracting talent from elsewhere. Also try to find away to keep local businesses going belly up to larger entities. But again commercial rent space is no joke either. Everyone is worried about affordable rent to live, but what about affordable rent to maintain businesses?
Bingo. Notice the city has been totally silent on affordable rent for businesses. You do know why don't you?

The generous subsidies de Blasio is giving to the poor do depend on a high tax base. De Blasio is giving repairs to NYCHA, but the money to support and maintain NYCHA has to come from somewhere. All the real estate taxes for starters, plus de Blasio has continued Bloomberg's practice for leasing out NYCHA land to developers. This tax revenue by the city and state are also why de Blasio and Cuomo could fund the MTA Capital program.

In cities without gentrification and that have a declining tax base like Detroit, the poor have it all the worse because there is no investment in amenities, no one wants to live there, and there is no tax base to support any programs in including ultimately the fire department in the cops.

With that said I agree the city needs to have a k-12 educational system that enables students from across the city to be able to compete with suburban kids for higher education.

For the gentry private schools and charter schools are already created so they don't have to send their kids to poor schools that are poorly run. Or if they sent their kids to a public school en masse they have the political pull to fix it.

What you said about the existing poor people in neighborhoods under transition is very true and is a result of the decades old neglect of urban education and the extreme marginalization of some communities, in part due to race and recent immigration status.
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Old 10-12-2015, 12:36 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
6,043 posts, read 6,091,039 times
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I would just give everyone who lives in NYCHA the deed to their apartment and then abolish the whole system. Turn them into co-ops and let the market determine who stays and who sells. NYCHA is financially a sinking boat anchor anyway. Something big needs to be done. I bet a bunch of them would sell and run...only having stayed this long for lack of options.
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Old 10-12-2015, 12:39 PM
 
Location: West Harlem
6,886 posts, read 7,839,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanAdventurer View Post
Something big needs to be done.
Indeed. Completely agree.
It will need to involve stopping predatory real estate investors in their tracks.
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Old 10-12-2015, 01:23 PM
 
4,168 posts, read 3,461,703 times
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This particular study is talking about the Issac Towers, which actually is minuscule and very tame in crime to the rest of the developments that NYCHA manages. It's in good Caucasian neighborhood. The UES has been considered to be upper crust for a while, and hasn't seen the true effects of gentrification. I don't understand why they picked this development. I feel the study would have yielded significantly different responses and results, if it were done in a NYCHA project where gentrification really impacted.
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Old 10-12-2015, 02:57 PM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,104,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanAdventurer View Post
I would just give everyone who lives in NYCHA the deed to their apartment and then abolish the whole system. Turn them into co-ops and let the market determine who stays and who sells. NYCHA is financially a sinking boat anchor anyway. Something big needs to be done. I bet a bunch of them would sell and run...only having stayed this long for lack of options.
Actually if the buildings were maintained well enough a lot of them would stay. Many Manhattan, Western Queens, and Western Brooklyn projects are in prime locations. Though if they were turned into co-ops, old people whose kids had moved on to other places would likely sell their parents co-ops when they died and cash out.

Your idea isn't a bad idea. The city would still need low income housing to house the elderly and disabled. However that does not need to be in Manhattan. I would support your plan for Manhattan projects, Western Queens, and Western Brooklyn projects.
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Old 10-12-2015, 03:08 PM
 
4,918 posts, read 5,536,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Actually if the buildings were maintained well enough a lot of them would stay. Many Manhattan, Western Queens, and Western Brooklyn projects are in prime locations. Though if they were turned into co-ops, old people whose kids had moved on to other places would likely sell their parents co-ops when they died and cash out.

Your idea isn't a bad idea. The city would still need low income housing to house the elderly and disabled. However that does not need to be in Manhattan. I would support your plan for Manhattan projects, Western Queens, and Western Brooklyn projects.
Who do you think urinates in and vandalizes the buildings? Its the people who live there! Its not like middle class folks take a detour on their way to/from work to **** in the stairwells/elevators of these buildings.
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Old 10-12-2015, 03:12 PM
 
119 posts, read 76,128 times
Reputation: 84
I believe the average NYCHA rent is around $450.00. If these properties were made into coops, the maintenance fees would necessarily have to be significantly higher. This isn't even taking into consideration the many needed, extensive repairs--just ordinary expenses like taxes, water, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Actually if the buildings were maintained well enough a lot of them would stay. Many Manhattan, Western Queens, and Western Brooklyn projects are in prime locations. Though if they were turned into co-ops, old people whose kids had moved on to other places would likely sell their parents co-ops when they died and cash out.

Your idea isn't a bad idea. The city would still need low income housing to house the elderly and disabled. However that does not need to be in Manhattan. I would support your plan for Manhattan projects, Western Queens, and Western Brooklyn projects.
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Old 10-12-2015, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
20,181 posts, read 26,480,657 times
Reputation: 9049
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSopp77 View Post
Yes and what is your point? Beggars can't be choosers. If they dont like living in a nice neighborhood hit the road moochers. Do you these people have any pride or self respect?

My point is that the quoted article was spot on, not a joke in any sense of the word. Gentrification does not confer any benefits on those in nearby public housing projects.
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