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View Poll Results: Do you have the New Yawk accent?
Yes 39 50.00%
No 39 50.00%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-13-2008, 12:09 PM
DAS
 
2,227 posts, read 3,533,547 times
Reputation: 865
There are older Black people in the Bronx that grew up in areas that Jewish people still resided in during the 1930's and 40's and they sound like Rangel too. This is not uncommon.
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Old 02-13-2008, 03:48 PM
 
124 posts, read 290,597 times
Reputation: 42
I didn't think I had a Brooklyn accent... until I moved out of Brooklyn.
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:20 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 2,054,981 times
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I'm from Queens, and lived on Long Island. Yes, I have an accent.
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Old 02-14-2008, 12:05 PM
 
31 posts, read 82,650 times
Reputation: 28
Everyone has an accent. There is no such thing as 'no accent' and even if there were a 'normal' way to pronounce words, it would be the Queen's English - certainly no American accent. Even people from Omaha, who apparently have a neutral accent, still sound American. It's very self centered to think you talk 'normally' and other people talk funny. Some NY-ers do have an NY accent - others may have a 'standard/neutral American accent'. Both are accents. You could possibly argue that you don't have a REGIONAL accent
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Old 04-25-2008, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Rochester Hills, MI
578 posts, read 1,734,143 times
Reputation: 277
Quote:
Originally Posted by BklynGal2476 View Post
I didn't think I had a Brooklyn accent... until I moved out of Brooklyn.
That's funny. I just read an article written by a Sociolinguist, and she was saying that "people from Michigan think they dont have an accent"....refuting that, she mentioned that there is NO such thing as "no accent".
As listening was my career for many years (being a transcriptionist) stenographer, you catch accents from around the USA, as well as from around the World. I enjoy the lilt and difference of many kinds of people, ethnicities, and cultures.
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Old 04-25-2008, 09:30 PM
 
181 posts, read 571,735 times
Reputation: 55
I'm from Texas. I have a Texas accent I'm sure, although most people who meet me don't think I have any accent at all. But in part I think that's because people NOT from Texas expect it to be like something from an episode of "Dallas."
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Old 04-26-2008, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Far Away From Poor People
11 posts, read 929 times
Reputation: 10
No I don't, I notice most people who do come from, how can I be nice "working" class households. Sophistication is very high over on my end.
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Old 04-26-2008, 07:35 AM
 
96 posts, read 265,435 times
Reputation: 26
i think the major thing is that people from NYC area talk WAAAAAAAY too fast. I spent 3 months out west, and nearly every single person I had more than a 5 minute talk with would go "Whoa you need to slow down I'm missing everything!". And then people would normally know instantly I was from NY. Crazy...
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Old 04-26-2008, 07:40 AM
 
96 posts, read 265,435 times
Reputation: 26
the funny thing too is that even though I grew up in the Bronx and Yonkers, both my parents were raised in Brooklyn and I still talk the way they do. It's crazy how you develop a way to say things when you're very young. I can't say some words correctly still. I remember getting crap for it in college in speech classes, and that could be frustrating. In the real world sounding "real" has helped me more than sounding "right".
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Old 04-26-2008, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Now in Houston!
923 posts, read 2,371,840 times
Reputation: 630
I actually confused my assistant this week with my Upstate accent. I asked him to contact a person named "Aaron" and he thought I mean "Erin". "Aaron" and "Erin" are pronounced the same in my dialect, (technically referred to by linguists as "Inland Northern") since we tend to flatten out our A's and sometimes pronounce them with a slight "E" inflection.
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