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Old 11-28-2016, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
1,074 posts, read 495,681 times
Reputation: 817

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
A CUNY degree from Baruch is not going to get you far at firm such as Edward Jones, but it may get one in. I have a family friend who works on Wall street, earned a degree at a community college. His position now requires someone to have graduated at an Ivy League. Wait a minute. You actually think I want a non college educated man named tyquan to work as an investment banker? You think I'm stupiud or something? No. I just want those who are not as educated as a top grad to get a leg up in the employment field. Top firms, will always hire from Ivy Leagues and top private schools.
Sometimes I agree with you but other times I am like "wtf is he talking about?" What field do you work in here in NYC? It's obvious it ain't accounting or finance because if you did you would realize that Baruch (which you are heavily discounting) has the most graduates overall working on Wall Street in accounting, finance and risk roles.

Of course having a Ivy League degree will always give you one foot in the door but for the most part it comes down to experience and internships. Let me speak from experience as a so-called millenial CPA who started out in tax and is now auditing clients big and small in private and gov't. Baruch graduates compete heavily with all of those top schools and is itself one of the top accounting programs in the nation.

NYC is the financial capital of America and probably the world. Which school alumni dominates Big 4 and top public accounting firms here? Baruch. Who do private equity, hedge fund, banks and other financial institutions love to hire? Accountants with strong public accounting background. These people often work in risk, compliance, internal audit, consulting and finance roles to a lesser extent.

Yes, Ivy league schools and top private schools tend to dominate management roles at these companies. Baruch is highly regarded here; the problem I have with the school (not its graduates) is that because of it gov't mandate, it can't be too selective and have too big a student body. However, this only reinforces the competition for top internships at big financial institutions and govt agencies such as the IRS, SEC etc.

I wish you would stop speaking in the abstract about everything.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:18 PM
 
162 posts, read 130,391 times
Reputation: 217
Seems like out-of-towners and immigrants are flowing into the city at a MUCH higher rate than in previous decades. This of course drives up living expenses to untenable levels. Even "way out" on Staten Island, I know MANY people who live at home until they're 30 because they want to stay on the island, but just can't afford a home. It makes no sense to rent if your parents don't mind you at home, so they might as well save up enough for a $100k down payment on a townhouse one day.

We've decided to look out in Jersey, and even there and it seems like you have to go much further away than you used to just to get an ok house in a safe neighborhood. Considering Philly.....
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:27 PM
Status: "I have "a thing" for duplex apartments" (set 7 hours ago)
 
Location: Confines of the 101 Precinct
19,274 posts, read 32,742,854 times
Reputation: 7619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoshanarose View Post
There is no set amount of unemployment/week.
It depends on your last salary.
Yeah but after a certain amount, its capped.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:36 PM
 
162 posts, read 130,391 times
Reputation: 217
I also wonder the effect of all those 20-somethings living a post-college lifestyle in the city with little risk, because their parents help them out, or WOULD help them out if something bad happens. I would assume that they disproportionately drive up rents because they are willing to bid high for very little space.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,880 posts, read 17,443,718 times
Reputation: 7538
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullandre View Post
Sometimes I agree with you but other times I am like "wtf is he talking about?" What field do you work in here in NYC? It's obvious it ain't accounting or finance because if you did you would realize that Baruch (which you are heavily discounting) has the most graduates overall working on Wall Street in accounting, finance and risk roles.

Of course having a Ivy League degree will always give you one foot in the door but for the most part it comes down to experience and internships. Let me speak from experience as a so-called millenial CPA who started out in tax and is now auditing clients big and small in private and gov't. Baruch graduates compete heavily with all of those top schools and is itself one of the top accounting programs in the nation.

NYC is the financial capital of America and probably the world. Which school alumni dominates Big 4 and top public accounting firms here? Baruch. Who do private equity, hedge fund, banks and other financial institutions love to hire? Accountants with strong public accounting background. These people often work in risk, compliance, internal audit, consulting and finance roles to a lesser extent.

Yes, Ivy league schools and top private schools tend to dominate management roles at these companies. Baruch is highly regarded here; the problem I have with the school (not its graduates) is that because of it gov't mandate, it can't be too selective and have too big a student body. However, this only reinforces the competition for top internships at big financial institutions and govt agencies such as the IRS, SEC etc.

I wish you would stop speaking in the abstract about everything.
Yo. Go find a girlfriend. I know that already my friend. Sorry if I angered you.

Last edited by Bronxguyanese; 11-28-2016 at 09:02 PM..
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Old 11-28-2016, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
1,074 posts, read 495,681 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
Yo. Go find a girlfriend. I know that already my friend. Sorry if I angered you.
lol @ anger, why you type all of that trash if you know already? Women aren't my problem. My current issue if finding listings/resources for foreclosed properties in Brooklyn.
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Old 11-28-2016, 10:16 PM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullandre View Post
Sometimes I agree with you but other times I am like "wtf is he talking about?" What field do you work in here in NYC? It's obvious it ain't accounting or finance because if you did you would realize that Baruch (which you are heavily discounting) has the most graduates overall working on Wall Street in accounting, finance and risk roles.

Of course having a Ivy League degree will always give you one foot in the door but for the most part it comes down to experience and internships. Let me speak from experience as a so-called millenial CPA who started out in tax and is now auditing clients big and small in private and gov't. Baruch graduates compete heavily with all of those top schools and is itself one of the top accounting programs in the nation.

NYC is the financial capital of America and probably the world. Which school alumni dominates Big 4 and top public accounting firms here? Baruch. Who do private equity, hedge fund, banks and other financial institutions love to hire? Accountants with strong public accounting background. These people often work in risk, compliance, internal audit, consulting and finance roles to a lesser extent.

Yes, Ivy league schools and top private schools tend to dominate management roles at these companies. Baruch is highly regarded here; the problem I have with the school (not its graduates) is that because of it gov't mandate, it can't be too selective and have too big a student body. However, this only reinforces the competition for top internships at big financial institutions and govt agencies such as the IRS, SEC etc.

I wish you would stop speaking in the abstract about everything.
Bronxguyanese is basically trying to say it has become impossible for the majority of people who would be considered working class or even middle class to have what most Americans would consider quality of life. Years ago, a person without any college degree, but who worked hard could expect to get their own apartment. Now unless they may not even be able to get their OWN ROOM unless they move to the fringes out the city.

He is saying that unless you're rich, you basically need to be in some sort of welfare housing to get buy in NYC. It's not 100% true, but there's a lot of truth too it. NYC has become a city where the average person just can't have a decent quality of life. To have any quality of life in any DECENT neighborhood, especially if one has children you would need to be making well into the six digits (100k is far too low).
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Old 11-29-2016, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Bronx
14,880 posts, read 17,443,718 times
Reputation: 7538
Quote:
Originally Posted by slapshotbob99 View Post
Seems like out-of-towners and immigrants are flowing into the city at a MUCH higher rate than in previous decades. This of course drives up living expenses to untenable levels. Even "way out" on Staten Island, I know MANY people who live at home until they're 30 because they want to stay on the island, but just can't afford a home. It makes no sense to rent if your parents don't mind you at home, so they might as well save up enough for a $100k down payment on a townhouse one day.

We've decided to look out in Jersey, and even there and it seems like you have to go much further away than you used to just to get an ok house in a safe neighborhood. Considering Philly.....
I agree with this. I remember reading an article that states plenty of black, Hispanic and to a certain degree white native new Yorkers are moving out of the city in record numbers. On the flip side, educated whites and Asians are moving into the city as well in record numbers. I posted it on another form thread before. I will have to look for it. The majority of white folks moving into the city tend to be very educated and hold a degree compared to the average American outside of NYC limits. Also you are right about saving up money and living with parents until ready to move. One of my good friends is an police officer. He could not afford anything in NYC for years. He saved up, and is moving 2 hours away from the city like plenty of other city civil workers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by slapshotbob99 View Post
I also wonder the effect of all those 20-somethings living a post-college lifestyle in the city with little risk, because their parents help them out, or WOULD help them out if something bad happens. I would assume that they disproportionately drive up rents because they are willing to bid high for very little space.
Simple economics. When demand goes up, prices goes up with it. I work in real estate and plenty of Transplants do use parents as guarantors in order to obtain a lease for apartments. Managing and maintaining a multi level property is an expensive ordeal. Lawyers have to be paid, property taxes have to be paid, building utilities, insurances, electricity, elevator fees and repairs has to be paid, as well as fines, lawsuits, damages that insurance does not cover and etc. The reason why Transplants live in Washington heights Mott Haven, Harlem, Astoria, LIC, Sunnyside, Greenpoint, Williamsburg, Bushwick, Bedstuy, Parkslope, Fort Green, Clinton Hill, and such is that these folks want to be close to job centers of Midtown and Downtown Manhattan. Call me when you hear about Transplants moving to Coney Island, Jamaica Queens, Coop City, or New Dorp.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Bronxguyanese is basically trying to say it has become impossible for the majority of people who would be considered working class or even middle class to have what most Americans would consider quality of life. Years ago, a person without any college degree, but who worked hard could expect to get their own apartment. Now unless they may not even be able to get their OWN ROOM unless they move to the fringes out the city.

He is saying that unless you're rich, you basically need to be in some sort of welfare housing to get buy in NYC. It's not 100% true, but there's a lot of truth too it. NYC has become a city where the average person just can't have a decent quality of life. To have any quality of life in any DECENT neighborhood, especially if one has children you would need to be making well into the six digits (100k is far too low).
Thanks NYwriterdude. Even though what I said was a rant. Some of it is true and I was trying to be realistic. I did not get a chance to correct myself. Right now, I have to say folks who live in NYCHA, rent control and rent stabilized apartments are pretty lucky.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bullandre View Post
lol @ anger, why you type all of that trash if you know already? Women aren't my problem. My current issue if finding listings/resources for foreclosed properties in Brooklyn.
Good. Now you are speaking my language. Help me find a property. Like antinmby. I'm sorry I angered you, but I was being realistic. I must have pushed a nerve to make you upset at me, because what I said probably hurt, just like how it hurt antinimby, and I'm sorry if I attacked the Anglo/Wasp/judeo capitalism system of your industry. I'm on the ground in NYC, and I meet all sorts of people, from all walks of life and such. I deal with high end and low end people on a daily basis, and me I'm just a middle man in a cog that is NYC. NYC is a premier city, and as a premier city, certain people wont flow here like how they used to a generation ago. For some its a good thing, but for others its a bad thing. If trying to fix the MTA is hard enough, how about trying to fix our public education system so that children can get a leg up in the competitive nature of NYC. This past month we saw how middle America broke the backs of NYC, San Francisco, DC, Ivy League town Boston, Film center LA just by using the power of the vote and electing Donald Trump. Just be thankful that corporate elite of Wall Street, and DC neoliberals/neocons screwed over Bernie Sanders for nomination. Boy oh boy. If Bernie was elected. Wall street would have tanked, and plenty of foreign investment will flee from NYC like a pack of rabid dogs. In matter of fact, all New Yorkers including myself should be thankful. All I want is for those that be, to assist New Yorkers with employment, and job training. That's it. Not for top position, no, never. Top positions require work, experience and commitment to a company.
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Old 11-29-2016, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,880 posts, read 17,443,718 times
Reputation: 7538
Here is a link to a Quinnipiac poll. Half of the poll voters can afford nyc, while the other half can and want to stay. Large number or blacks prefer to leave NYC in this poll. This shows the reality of economics if black Americans in NYC. While hispanics and whites came in 2nd and 3rd. On the bright side, some in the poll say they enjoy thr quality of life in nyc.

https://poll.qu.edu/new-york-city/re...ReleaseID=2404
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Old 11-29-2016, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
1,074 posts, read 495,681 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Bronxguyanese is basically trying to say it has become impossible for the majority of people who would be considered working class or even middle class to have what most Americans would consider quality of life. Years ago, a person without any college degree, but who worked hard could expect to get their own apartment. Now unless they may not even be able to get their OWN ROOM unless they move to the fringes out the city.

He is saying that unless you're rich, you basically need to be in some sort of welfare housing to get buy in NYC. It's not 100% true, but there's a lot of truth too it. NYC has become a city where the average person just can't have a decent quality of life. To have any quality of life in any DECENT neighborhood, especially if one has children you would need to be making well into the six digits (100k is far too low).
I understood the point he was making, I just find the whole school issue as overgeneralizing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
I agree with this. I remember reading an article that states plenty of black, Hispanic and to a certain degree white native new Yorkers are moving out of the city in record numbers. On the flip side, educated whites and Asians are moving into the city as well in record numbers. I posted it on another form thread before. I will have to look for it. The majority of white folks moving into the city tend to be very educated and hold a degree compared to the average American outside of NYC limits. Also you are right about saving up money and living with parents until ready to move. One of my good friends is an police officer. He could not afford anything in NYC for years. He saved up, and is moving 2 hours away from the city like plenty of other city civil workers.




Simple economics. When demand goes up, prices goes up with it. I work in real estate and plenty of Transplants do use parents as guarantors in order to obtain a lease for apartments. Managing and maintaining a multi level property is an expensive ordeal. Lawyers have to be paid, property taxes have to be paid, building utilities, insurances, electricity, elevator fees and repairs has to be paid, as well as fines, lawsuits, damages that insurance does not cover and etc. The reason why Transplants live in Washington heights Mott Haven, Harlem, Astoria, LIC, Sunnyside, Greenpoint, Williamsburg, Bushwick, Bedstuy, Parkslope, Fort Green, Clinton Hill, and such is that these folks want to be close to job centers of Midtown and Downtown Manhattan. Call me when you hear about Transplants moving to Coney Island, Jamaica Queens, Coop City, or New Dorp.




Thanks NYwriterdude. Even though what I said was a rant. Some of it is true and I was trying to be realistic. I did not get a chance to correct myself. Right now, I have to say folks who live in NYCHA, rent control and rent stabilized apartments are pretty lucky.




Good. Now you are speaking my language. Help me find a property. Like antinmby. I'm sorry I angered you, but I was being realistic. I must have pushed a nerve to make you upset at me, because what I said probably hurt, just like how it hurt antinimby, and I'm sorry if I attacked the Anglo/Wasp/judeo capitalism system of your industry. I'm on the ground in NYC, and I meet all sorts of people, from all walks of life and such. I deal with high end and low end people on a daily basis, and me I'm just a middle man in a cog that is NYC. NYC is a premier city, and as a premier city, certain people wont flow here like how they used to a generation ago. For some its a good thing, but for others its a bad thing. If trying to fix the MTA is hard enough, how about trying to fix our public education system so that children can get a leg up in the competitive nature of NYC. This past month we saw how middle America broke the backs of NYC, San Francisco, DC, Ivy League town Boston, Film center LA just by using the power of the vote and electing Donald Trump. Just be thankful that corporate elite of Wall Street, and DC neoliberals/neocons screwed over Bernie Sanders for nomination. Boy oh boy. If Bernie was elected. Wall street would have tanked, and plenty of foreign investment will flee from NYC like a pack of rabid dogs. In matter of fact, all New Yorkers including myself should be thankful. All I want is for those that be, to assist New Yorkers with employment, and job training. That's it. Not for top position, no, never. Top positions require work, experience and commitment to a company.
Brethren, I do know the situation sucks for people especially those stuck in the middle income bands -- they don't make enough to live comfortably, yet they don't qualify for most govt programs and benefits. It forces people to get creative and seek out a secondary source of income.

As a minority from the Caribbean, I don't care for the capitalist system you refer too. As a matter of fact, I'm disgusted with the greed and corruption of the system. Also, I'm turned off by the stupid liberal policies of NYC. We have a mayor (whom I don't hate) encouraging Central American kids to move here into the school system, which is already suffering. We have the Feds who are allowing dirty foreign money to skew the real estate industry. Local law that mandates NYC govt to provide housing for everyone. Pure madness.

The plan is to leave this place soon.
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