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Old 11-30-2016, 08:47 PM
 
36 posts, read 57,990 times
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I am trying to keep my budget under $2500. One of my reasons for accepting the position is to be back in a big city. I have been in AZ for a while now and trying to escape. I live in Phoenix which feels like a giant suburb without much of the hustle/bustle in a city.
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Old 11-30-2016, 08:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hays0023 View Post
I am trying to keep my budget under $2500. One of my reasons for accepting the position is to be back in a big city. I have been in AZ for a while now and trying to escape. I live in Phoenix which feels like a giant suburb without much of the hustle/bustle in a city.
I'm not sure of the rents in the upscale neighborhoods you suggested (Park Slope, Brooklyn Heights, etc.) but I know in my own unhip neighborhood in Queens, the one bedrooms are approaching $2000, so I'm guessing you might end up in a studio in one of those areas if you want to stay below $2500.

If I were coming to NYC for a new job and trying to find the hustle and bustle of the city, then Bay Ridge would not be my first choice, but it might still be a good one to put on your list to look at if you have sticker shock in the other neighborhoods.

In terms of commutes, you can either use Google maps directions (click train icon) or the MTA trip planner. Since you're working in a hospital, you might have weird commute times, so be sure to run through different time options when you check commutes. I would try to stay along the same train line where your job is located. If you go somewhere like Williamsburg, your commute could be too long due to train transfers. Also...the L train is going to be down pretty soon for repairs for a year or a few years, so try to avoid anything that involves the L.
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Old 11-30-2016, 08:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by toast890 View Post
I personally believe it. My quality of life was very low when I was living in Sunset Park along the R train. R train was inconvenient. Too many inconsiderate neighbors who blasted their music at all hours. Littered and dirty sidewalks. When it got windy, the litter would fly and hit you in the face sometimes.

Quality of life was moderate when living in Hell's kitchen. Lots of amenities and easy access to train.. But rush hour traffic noise pollution was bad! Otherwise relatively peaceful . Neighbors were mostly young professionals who were respectful.

Upper East Side -- very high quality of life. Clean sidewalks, great groceries. Just a tad... boring. Residential yet highly commercialized.

Park Slope and Brooklyn Heights -- the greatest. My favorite neighborhoods. Nothing bad to say.
Yes, it makes a big difference. I wish I could live in an amazing, clean, vibrant neighborhood with all the amenities that suit me. But...I'm not made of money
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:06 PM
 
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Good to know about the L train - one I was looking at was right near a stop....WHEW!!!
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by hays0023 View Post
Good to know about the L train - one I was looking at was right near a stop....WHEW!!!
I just looked it up and the beginning of the project is still two years away. Still, it's something to be aware of.
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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And even when the L isn't shut down, it still sucks. But anyway, I'll go:

Forest Hills: quiet, suburban, but decent subway access. I lived here as a kid and I feel like it was a good place to live as a kid. I don't really care to ever live there again though, or at least for the time being.

2 Bridges (FiDi/Chinatown area): very convienient location. Good for when I was in college + didn't mind sharing really small spaces (even for NYC standards) with roommates. I don't miss my apartment here but I really miss the location. I miss being able to walk to Canal st for cheap food, + Chinatown in general, SoHo, and LES for weekend nights. The apartment was small, old, and dirty tho.

Carroll Gardens: really nice neighborhood. So quiet + peaceful. I got lucky and was able to rent a room from my friends condo for cheap. We had an amazing roof where you could see the Statue of Liberty. This was definitely the highest quality my life has been since moving out of my parents house. I felt a little out of place though as an early 20s single person. There are so many families here.

(South) Williamsburg: this is where I live now and have been for a little over a year. I love it. I never hung out in Williamsburg before, but I ended up moving here to take a job off the L train in Brooklyn after finding a suspiciously good deal on Craigslist. I thought it would be really annoying, but I actually love it, and all the neighborhoods around it (Bushwick, Greenpoint) The nightlife is really great, and the area is mostly young people. I love the street art and the grittiness, and there's always something going on. And I love the waterfront areas and the bridge. The bridge is my favorite part of the neighborhood, and the Williamsburg bridge has become my favorite bridge. It's a much more pleasant walk than the Brooklyn bridge (less crowded/touristy, more space, separate bike+pedestrian), and I love that it's covered in graffiti the whole way, and that it goes to LES. I'm also a quick subway ride away from EV, WV, Meatpacking.
But the downside is that I live in a really old, small building under the JMZ and it's really loud. I'm used to it though.
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Old 12-01-2016, 03:28 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,574,584 times
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Originally Posted by hays0023 View Post
I am getting ready to move to Brooklyn for a job at Lutheran Hospital and was going to try and live closer to the hospital in Sunset Park. OP is it that bad? Other thoughts that I have had were Park Slope, Brooklyn Heights, or bite the bullet and commute from Williamsburg.

Does anyone have thoughts on a bit longer of a commute to Lutheran for improved quality of life?
Park Slope, Brooklyn Heights, and Williamsburg are very expensive.

I honestly don't think Sunset Park is bad, get a feel of the neighborhood for yourself.
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Old 12-01-2016, 07:44 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
2,459 posts, read 1,820,309 times
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quality of life is absolutely affected by the neighborhood you live in. I remember reading a while back about how people in the South Bronx don't have access to fresh fruits and vegetables - only the frozen types from the supermarkets. They are also bombarded by pollution and asthma.

Me personally, working in midtown has improved my diet and overall health as I have daily access to a gym and good food. There are hardly any gyms up where I live, except for the low quality ones.
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Old 12-01-2016, 08:00 AM
 
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I lived in Dumbo from 2007 to 2015. It was already gentrified by the artist when I moved in as part of the yuppie wave. Loved it for many years, especially the earlier years. But then after the different Brooklyn Bridge Parks and Piers started opening up and the hordes of tourists starting pouring in, QOL went downhill. Sold my condo and moved to the quiet suburbs.
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Old 12-01-2016, 08:31 AM
 
1,032 posts, read 995,435 times
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I've only lived in a few neighborhoods.

Throggs Neck (Bronx) - grew up here and have been back and forth many times over the years, and while I enjoyed that, as an adult commuting to Manhattan, I'd never do it again. Public transportation options are weak and take forever. Attitudes are not very modern (lots of racists), and very little in the way of nightlife/shopping/restaurants.

Upper East Side - lived here 3 separate times and I loved it. Yep, it's boring. But that was one of the things I liked about it. It was nice and quiet for real life, if I wanted noise and excitement, it was super easy and quick to get to.

Lower East Side - never again. Noisy, dirty, where I was was too far from anything interesting to be of value, and also far from the subway.

Astoria (current) - I'm pretty happy here. I'm in a quieter part of the neighborhood, on a mostly residential street. Sometimes street noise can be a little loud but it's not constant. I can park my car decently easily. I can be at my mom's house in the Bronx in 15 minutes. My commute is about 35 minutes door to door on one train. I'm not able to leave NYC yet, so this will do for now. I don't think I would want to live in Manhattan again, because I've remembered how much I like being a driver. (Unless I was making about $300k....that would change my mind haha). Hoping to not move again until I either buy something (unlikely here) or leave altogether - destination still TBD though.
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