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Old 12-11-2016, 03:25 PM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,288,115 times
Reputation: 2834

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Why are they "total AHs"?


Why don't you just live and let live, in other words mind your business.


It isn't for you to say how anyone else should spend their money/their living situations. Is anyone coming to you each month and asking for anything?


Recent college graduates/young adults have been living in roommate situations for decades. It was the same in the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's, 1950's.... By the 1990's there was even a famous sitcom on television (Friends), about the thing.


Face it unless you have lived in NYC all your life *and* have some juice (family connections or just plain luck), you need to earn > 75k to find an apartment in Manhattan. Going by the 40x rule one needs to earn about $150k per to qualify for that apartment mentioned in NYT.


Yes, one of those young adults probably could find *something* in Yorkville on Third Avenue or east for around $2,100 or so. Such an apartment would likely be a small studio (perhaps renovated recently) in a tenement walk up or small elevator building. Ditto goes for things further north above 96th street onto Harlem, Morningside Heights, Inwood, etc...


But here is a news flash for you; not everyone wants to live "uptown". Besides as the article makes clear these young adults aren't "rent poor"; they just do not seem willing to blow 3/4 or more of their monthly income on rent, a very wise decision IMHO.


Right now Manhattan below 14th Street and certainly from Houston Street to the Financial District is *HOT*. So much so the NYT did a huge piece on the area last Sunday. In short the vibe and all things young people like are now downtown.


As for "rents going up", again you don't know what you're talking about.
http://ny.curbed.com/2016/12/8/13882...klyn-manhattan


Market rents are a fact of supply and demand. Right now there is plenty of supply (and more coming online) but demand is slowing (a bit). Thus landlords are offering concessions or whatever that reduce the rent. The fact landlords are offering concessions instead of just lowering rents proves your theory wrong; these "transplants" or others taking market rate housing aren't having any affect on rents going "up".
Your argument makes no sense just like these asshats.

The fact that you don't understand why some landlords are offering "concessions" shows your ignorance of the market. Landlords are offering "concessions" in order to keep average rents up. It's not because their buildings are in danger of high vacancy rates.


Have you ever heard of a minimum advertised price? It's sort of like that. The higher the advertised average rent price, the healthier the market is for landlords/management agencies. Another example is a retailer running a "sale" but the week before increasing the prices.

The "concessions" that these landlords are offering are looking for idiots like those in the article. They'll jack up the price of a 1 bedroom by $500/month and then offer a month for free. Asshats not from NYC don't know any better because they probably grew up in more honest surroundings.



Claiming that it was the same in the 20's, 50's , etc. is dishonest. It's simply not true. Four adults in a single bedroom was never the norm unless it was due to poverty

If you claim it is, then you're a fool.
Quote:
Originally Posted by incaita View Post
troll pieces?
Yes, the NYT real estate section is notorious for these type of pieces. It's a troll piece.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:14 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
No one can't hate the Transplants on these ones. They are just trying to get by and do more by living in appealing area. I while having less space and privacy. The real problems here are landlords for making rents not so affordable, however being an landlord in nyc is an expensive ordeal. Two tranplants do not live in far flung neighborhoods. I. Have a coworker from California. I told him, if I was from California and I moved to nyc. I would have to live in an hip area like Williamsburg. You won't be cool living in a Jamaica Queens.

The best way for rents to come down is probably world war 3 were transplants fear moving to NYC due to concerns of Chinese or Russian warheads destroying everything centered in the. Manhattan ground zero.

Two. Let employers create job offices near college campuses so that tranplants won't move to nyc. Rents will drop down.
Trying to live in the most hip area when you cannot afford it is STUPID.

At a certain time you need to consider middle and old age. If you are spending all your money on rent, will you be able to afford to buy? Are you going to move up in your career? If you keep paying expensive rents, what happens to you when you have to retire?

Mind you if you've come to NYC to go to college or do some internship or something else for your career, you may not be vested in the city long term and that is fine. But any transplant that is considering living in NYC permanently needs to get out of living in the coolest neighborhoods and doing the coolest things just because.

Employers creating jobs ner college campuses? NYC itself has lots of college campuses. Employers don't need to specifically create jobs near college campuses. It's up to college graduates to exercise GOOD judgement and not be STUPID and TRENDY.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:15 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
How can you blame the landlords? These fools do this to themselves. This is not "just trying to get by" behavior. These are asshats who don't want to let go of the college lifestyle.

Call a spade a spade. They're morons.

Compare what the general outlook is on immigrants who live multiple families to a unit to these asshats.
Don't get caught up in the white hype.
Agreed. I would rep you but the system won't let me.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:17 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Is Williamsburg even "hip" anymore?
You're right about that. Williamsburg is solidly gentrified, and you would either need to be rich or have a solid professional job to live there. The original people called hipsters can't even afford Williamsburg, they move into Bedstuy or Bushwick, or even East New York.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:22 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Why are they "total AHs"?


Why don't you just live and let live, in other words mind your business.


It isn't for you to say how anyone else should spend their money/their living situations. Is anyone coming to you each month and asking for anything?


Recent college graduates/young adults have been living in roommate situations for decades. It was the same in the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's, 1950's.... By the 1990's there was even a famous sitcom on television (Friends), about the thing.


Face it unless you have lived in NYC all your life *and* have some juice (family connections or just plain luck), you need to earn > 75k to find an apartment in Manhattan. Going by the 40x rule one needs to earn about $150k per to qualify for that apartment mentioned in NYT.


Yes, one of those young adults probably could find *something* in Yorkville on Third Avenue or east for around $2,100 or so. Such an apartment would likely be a small studio (perhaps renovated recently) in a tenement walk up or small elevator building. Ditto goes for things further north above 96th street onto Harlem, Morningside Heights, Inwood, etc...


But here is a news flash for you; not everyone wants to live "uptown". Besides as the article makes clear these young adults aren't "rent poor"; they just do not seem willing to blow 3/4 or more of their monthly income on rent, a very wise decision IMHO.


Right now Manhattan below 14th Street and certainly from Houston Street to the Financial District is *HOT*. So much so the NYT did a huge piece on the area last Sunday. In short the vibe and all things young people like are now downtown.


As for "rents going up", again you don't know what you're talking about.
http://ny.curbed.com/2016/12/8/13882...klyn-manhattan


Market rents are a fact of supply and demand. Right now there is plenty of supply (and more coming online) but demand is slowing (a bit). Thus landlords are offering concessions or whatever that reduce the rent. The fact landlords are offering concessions instead of just lowering rents proves your theory wrong; these "transplants" or others taking market rate housing aren't having any affect on rents going "up".
Of course people can LIVE wherever they want to and spend there money wherever they want to.

However, I've hung out at various places around the city for years. The trendiest people who bragged about living in the hottest neighborhoods often did not have the careers to sustain it, and often had to leave NYC in utter defeat the way Eastboundanddown chick described them. It's not smart or good for your long term future to spend disproportionate amounts of money on rent. And what are these fools closed to downtown? BARS! Spend all your money on RENT just to live close to BARS, when the reality is there is ALCOHOL and DRUGS everywhere.

Don't get me wrong, ANYONE can SPEND their money as they chose, but there is no reason to glorify extremely poor decisions as something WONDERFUL.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:28 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Your argument makes no sense just like these asshats.




Claiming that it was the same in the 20's, 50's , etc. is dishonest. It's simply not true. Four adults in a single bedroom was never the norm unless it was due to poverty

If you claim it is, then you're a fool.


Yes, the NYT real estate section is notorious for these type of pieces. It's a troll piece.
Back in the early 20th century, a lot of recent immigrants (mainly from Europe)were poor and lived in overcrowded tenements). Of course as people worked and moved up socioeconomically they moved on to better circumstances.

As for the concessions, sales in clothing stores are like that. Retailers will jack up the price by 40% and then say 15% off in order to get people to buy. So it's still 25% more expensive than it would have been. In the case of the lease, the free month given just entices people into signing overpriced leases for the next year or two.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:31 AM
 
23,265 posts, read 16,096,003 times
Reputation: 8543
I ultimately agree with Wawaweewa. As long as people are willing to pay outrageous sums of money to live like rats, real estate prices in NYC are going to remain as. As soon as the people mentioned in the article get tired of it and move on, the next bunch of kids will move in to replace them.

And it's not that they can't get good paying jobs back home. NYC is a cool destination, so it's cool to say you've lived in NYC for a couple of years and after it's done you'll have a lot of stories to tell people back home.

If more housing where built in NYC, you'd just have more people coming it and the city would be back where it is now. The only way to decrease prices is to decrease demand.
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:12 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,447 posts, read 2,280,526 times
Reputation: 4911
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I ultimately agree with Wawaweewa. As long as people are willing to pay outrageous sums of money to live like rats, real estate prices in NYC are going to remain as. As soon as the people mentioned in the article get tired of it and move on, the next bunch of kids will move in to replace them.

And it's not that they can't get good paying jobs back home. NYC is a cool destination, so it's cool to say you've lived in NYC for a couple of years and after it's done you'll have a lot of stories to tell people back home.

If more housing where built in NYC, you'd just have more people coming it and the city would be back where it is now. The only way to decrease prices is to decrease demand.
That's a very unintelligent and backward way to fix a problem.

If you have a business that has growing demand, the right way to deal with that is to increase capacity, not tell customers that we don't want your business, now go away. If a bus line has more and more passengers, you add more buses, not tell the passengers to go take a taxi.

Your way of dealing with growth and success is destined to fail. Even in the same post, you say there will always be new kids moving in to replace the ones that leave, so essentially, there will never be a decrease in demand. Yeah and a nuclear bomb going off will make NYC real estate even cheaper.

You post so much and quite a bit of it is just nonsense. Of course, you like to get the last word in so I'm sure you'll come back with something just as nonsensical.
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:40 AM
 
2,928 posts, read 1,194,223 times
Reputation: 3281
Transplants are and arent the problem. They are just moving into the wrong areas!

These rents are being jacked up. every time some one moves, the legal rent goes up on rent controlled,stabilized apartments. These realtors are pushing the rent up as well, cause they just have to give themselves a raise. Then you have these new apartments that command a high rent.

And finally that home owner with the nerve to charge $1800 a month rent for a basement apartment in Astoria and LIC. WTH!

The closer you are to the city, the most rent you pay. I cant imagine paying $2000 a month of rent for a 20x20 apartment in Manhattan.

But the hard facts , people are paying.
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Old 12-12-2016, 09:53 AM
 
Location: NYC
11,832 posts, read 7,718,890 times
Reputation: 12819
This been happening for decades, how is it another New troll piece.

When I started out, I was sharing a Chelsea apt back then for $600 with another roomie. His rent was only $900 for the 2 bedroom and I was paying for most of his rent. Today you have the unthinkable that people would split a single bedroom 3-4 ways.

That's normally what an illegal immigrant is doing.
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