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Old 12-24-2016, 03:50 PM
 
4,145 posts, read 3,439,875 times
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Bank branches have been in Harlem since businesses got tax credits from the federal and state governments for investing in busted up urban areas, and this is likely a factor in why Whole Foods is now in Central Harlem. Harlem still is not gentrified. I live there now. In my area there have been recent shootings due to drug turf wars, aside from quality of life issues like loud music and typical things that happen in the hood. And I live in one of the nice parts of Harlem.
wells fargo, was not in harlem until recent years, and only one location. major banks have BEEN in the hood. tax credits or not. who cares. harlem is gentrified. anytime longtime residents, and businesses are being priced out of their own neighborhoods, cant afford to live or work there anymore, and droves of caucasions who were not there before are now living in the neighborhood. it's gentrified. once you see big box retail stores, like h&m and banana republic, red lobster, on harlem's main street. 125th. it's gentrified. now had you said east harlem is not gentrified, you would have known what you were talking about
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Old 12-24-2016, 03:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
A lot of the hood lacks character in a sense...too many auto body shops, fast food (most of which is chains), 99 cent stores, etc., rather than bars, restaurants, clothing stores, etc.
i actually agree
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Old 12-24-2016, 04:55 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellUpInHarlem View Post
wells fargo, was not in harlem until recent years, and only one location. major banks have BEEN in the hood. tax credits or not. who cares. harlem is gentrified. anytime longtime residents, and businesses are being priced out of their own neighborhoods, cant afford to live or work there anymore, and droves of caucasions who were not there before are now living in the neighborhood. it's gentrified. once you see big box retail stores, like h&m and banana republic, red lobster, on harlem's main street. 125th. it's gentrified. now had you said east harlem is not gentrified, you would have known what you were talking about
I live in West Harlem, but I moved out on Dec. 31st (I'm done with my program at Columbia).

White college students, medical residents, and other people jump starting their careers, bartenders, and those with entry level jobs who can barely afford their rooms in Harlem do not make a neighborhood well off. Call me when large numbers of white families are raising their families in Harlem.

The poverty stats for Harlem zones range from about 20% to over 50%.

Mapping Poverty in America - The New York Times

Mind you the threshold of poverty is 23,000 for a family of 4 and 11,000 for an individual. And if that low bar of poverty is the poverty rate, then it let's you know how high the poverty rate of Harlem truly is.

The suburbs and certain parts of lower Manhattan have much lower rates of poverty. Harlem is still the hood and will be for a very long time.

East Harlem residents hope police raids in NYCHA buildings will make community safer | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

NYPD, NYCHA speak out after largest gang raid in NYC history | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

And before you say that's East Harlem, with it's high level of NYCHA projects (Second biggest in the city), here's info on West Harlem's issues

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/05/n...ects.html?_r=0
No Backspace: NYPD Raids Won’t Solve NYCHA’s Violence Problem | City Limits

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/201...ights-teenager

There's always a lot of violence in Grant and the Manhattanville projects.
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Old 12-24-2016, 05:34 PM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,280,911 times
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I live in West Harlem, but I moved out on Dec. 31st (I'm done with my program at Columbia).

White college students, medical residents, and other people jump starting their careers, bartenders, and those with entry level jobs who can barely afford their rooms in Harlem do not make a neighborhood well off. Call me when large numbers of white families are raising their families in Harlem.

The poverty stats for Harlem zones range from about 20% to over 50%.

Mapping Poverty in America - The New York Times

Mind you the threshold of poverty is 23,000 for a family of 4 and 11,000 for an individual. And if that low bar of poverty is the poverty rate, then it let's you know how high the poverty rate of Harlem truly is.

The suburbs and certain parts of lower Manhattan have much lower rates of poverty. Harlem is still the hood and will be for a very long time.

East Harlem residents hope police raids in NYCHA buildings will make community safer | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

NYPD, NYCHA speak out after largest gang raid in NYC history | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

And before you say that's East Harlem, with it's high level of NYCHA projects (Second biggest in the city), here's info on West Harlem's issues

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/05/n...ects.html?_r=0
No Backspace: NYPD Raids Won’t Solve NYCHA’s Violence Problem | City Limits

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/201...ights-teenager

There's always a lot of violence in Grant and the Manhattanville projects.
I think your definition of gentrification is a little off. Your definition of gentrification would be a lagging indicator.

It's like claiming that Williamsburg only gentrified when million dollar+ lofts started to be built when in fact it gentrified 10-15 years earlier.

When people like me were/are looking to live in Harlem, it's ****ing gentrified my friend.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:05 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
I think your definition of gentrification is a little off. Your definition of gentrification would be a lagging indicator.

It's like claiming that Williamsburg only gentrified when million dollar+ lofts started to be built when in fact it gentrified 10-15 years earlier.

When people like me were/are looking to live in Harlem, it's ****ing gentrified my friend.
That's exactly when I considered Williamsburg truly gentrified into a desirable neighborhood. When those million dollar lofts were built out of warehouses and other industrial buildings. This really took off when real estate rebounded after the financial crisis.

Harlem is nowhere near a Williamsburg or LIC.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:11 PM
 
3,700 posts, read 2,485,824 times
Reputation: 2614
quote:
once you see big box retail stores, like h&m and banana republic, red lobster, on harlem's main street. 125th. it's gentrified.

LOL

corny ass chain stores, half of which are factory outlets? Sorry, that's still hood shopping.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
2,285 posts, read 1,273,837 times
Reputation: 1049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquarius37 View Post
quote:
once you see big box retail stores, like h&m and banana republic, red lobster, on harlem's main street. 125th. it's gentrified.

LOL

corny ass chain stores, half of which are factory outlets? Sorry, that's still hood shopping.
By the way, you can quote a post by pressing the "QUOTE" button underneath it. You don't have to write "quote:" and copy the post.
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Old 12-25-2016, 08:09 AM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,280,911 times
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
That's exactly when I considered Williamsburg truly gentrified into a desirable neighborhood. When those million dollar lofts were built out of warehouses and other industrial buildings. This really took off when real estate rebounded after the financial crisis.

Harlem is nowhere near a Williamsburg or LIC.
If you wait for million dollar condos as signs of gentrification then you're way behind the curve.
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Old 12-25-2016, 10:06 AM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,049,776 times
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Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
If you wait for million dollar condos as signs of gentrification then you're way behind the curve.
Not really. Harlem is still a ghetto, with major issues that poor neighborhoods have. Some white people who can't afford nicer neighborhoods moving into doesn't change that.

New York Times, DNAInfo, and other news sources exaggerate both the demographic change and the amenities in Harlem.

And they downplay the crime, noise, busted up poorly maintained buildings, etc.

There was more than one shooting very close to my BLOCK! I see the kids out on the street getting arrested for this thing and that thing (to get it out soon). I on my way to classes at Columbia l passed the NYCHA's every day, and yeah Harlem has SROs, shelters, and other social service housing which means the neighborhood has a huge poor population which will not go away anytime soon.

There are good deals on people purchasing co-ops or Brownstones, and those prices are going up, but let's not pretend that's anywhere near enough to completely transform the neighborhood.

I'm also a 6'2" bearded black guy. While I do come and go at any hour of the night, I can't say all groups of people will necessarily feel comfortable doing this in the neighborhood. Particularly because in Harlem fashion one will find large groups of people hanging outside, especially when it is warm. I do think that there are some white people who can tolerate this, but there are others who can't. In short, Harlem is not completely gentrifying any time soon.

On the West side you do get some nice stores, bars, restaurants, but this is because of the neighborhood academic institutions.
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Old 12-25-2016, 12:10 PM
 
849 posts, read 451,498 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I'm also a 6'2" bearded black guy. While I do come and go at any hour of the night, I can't say all groups of people will necessarily feel comfortable doing this in the neighborhood. Particularly because in Harlem fashion one will find large groups of people hanging outside, especially when it is warm. I do think that there are some white people who can tolerate this, but there are others who can't. In short, Harlem is not completely gentrifying any time soon.
This is true, and I am often surprised at the people who refuse to do it... I'm a big (white) dude and I walk around a lot, mostly from east harlem to/from city college, often late-ish around 8 or 9... I don't care, nobody harasses me, I mind my own business. Yeah sometimes I get glares but so what. Meanwhile my super liberal family who pride themselves on being tolerant and understanding will take the bus three blocks because they don't want to walk along 125th street where it's full of witnesses anyway. Frankly I found that kind of funny.
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