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Old 12-17-2016, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,780 posts, read 17,397,072 times
Reputation: 7508

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With high costs of living in NYC of both owning and renting. Renters and buyers are now looking else where for affordability, while remaining close to the city and still having a some what city lifestyle. A few months ago while I was in DC visiting. In the hotel lobby I came across a policy maker. This policy maker where I wont share his name told me that the future of America will be the suburbs and not the cities. I said why? He said the cities have become too expensive, and will remain expensive places to live maybe for another decade or two. Cities might experience an market crash similar to what main street felt during the recession, it might be the only way prices may fall. But only time will tell. Also cities due to cost do not have high quality life, homelessness, crowded schools and transportation are issues that can not be solve.

I'm no big fan of the NYT and I'm happy they got embarrassed during the election for riding the Hillary *****. Now I came across an article about urban suburbs, and how people are relocating to Long Island in new developments built near the Long Island Rail Road. These developments offer more space, and half the money of costs compared to living in hip areas of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Whats your take on this, and will more developments like this pop up in the NYC area. Will such developments force landlords to lower rents, and maybe new developments in the city to lower ownership prices in prime areas to keep buyers interest alive?

http://www.bing.com/cr?IG=F088630D96...p=DevEx,5021.1
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:24 PM
 
3,700 posts, read 2,485,824 times
Reputation: 2614
Thank you for not injecting your usual amount of misogyny into this post :/
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:25 PM
 
3,700 posts, read 2,485,824 times
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oh wait, you kinda sorta DID
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:51 PM
 
7,549 posts, read 7,974,415 times
Reputation: 8017
It's not going to happen.

Long Islanders block these types of developments. They are not any cheaper than the ones in the outer boroughs. Also, it's a matter of age and lifestyle cycle. The Urban millennials will grow up and want a house with a backyard for their own kids. It's already happening to the older Millenials who are not upper middle class. It's cheaper to buy a house than stay in Manhattan with kids.
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:59 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,133 posts, read 5,940,379 times
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Only way to accommodate a bigger population in metro New York is to build up -- whether in the city or the 'burbs. It's smartest to build near train stops (transit oriented development) though that's not always possible. There's still a lot of NIMBY in many suburbs but I think we'll see less and less of it, not because neighbors love their single family low-rise nabes, but because businesses in the area will be pressing for (relatively) affordable places to live for their workers. And multi family housing with a some typical urban amenities will help attract the workers they want.
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Old 12-17-2016, 05:23 PM
 
849 posts, read 451,498 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
It's not going to happen.

Long Islanders block these types of developments. They are not any cheaper than the ones in the outer boroughs. Also, it's a matter of age and lifestyle cycle. The Urban millennials will grow up and want a house with a backyard for their own kids. It's already happening to the older Millenials who are not upper middle class. It's cheaper to buy a house than stay in Manhattan with kids.
I don't know about Long Island, but when I visit my parents in Ossining I see new 30 story apartment buildings near the train station in many towns that I pass along in Metro North, especially Tarrytown and Ossining.

The suburbs are definitely booming, or at least construction is.
The problem is the rents in these buildings are often close to as much as they are in some middle-cost areas in the city... 2500 for a nice 1br, etc. So my guess is they will build a lot of luxury apartments for people fleeing high city costs but they won't get as many takers as they think.
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Old 12-17-2016, 05:41 PM
 
18,242 posts, read 11,645,412 times
Reputation: 11850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
It's not going to happen.

Long Islanders block these types of developments. They are not any cheaper than the ones in the outer boroughs. Also, it's a matter of age and lifestyle cycle. The Urban millennials will grow up and want a house with a backyard for their own kids. It's already happening to the older Millenials who are not upper middle class. It's cheaper to buy a house than stay in Manhattan with kids.


Not no more they aren't, or rather can.


Garden City was sued (and lost) by blacks and their supporters over their property laws restricting multi family housing development. If you think it will end there, you are wrong.


Judge rules Garden City must create affordable housing | News 12 Long Island


https://lawyerscommittee.org/press-r...eering-policy/


http://www.newsday.com/long-island/t...ties-1.7818810


Meanwhile Obama and his housing administration has been busting (or attempting to) the suburbs by telling them they must build "affordable" and or multi-family housing.


Westchester housing deal: What's next, if anything=


Construction begins on Rye Brook affordable housing=




Saratoga Springs affordable housing meeting draws crowd - Times Union
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Old 12-17-2016, 05:54 PM
 
9,313 posts, read 13,839,731 times
Reputation: 9354
Transit-oriented development is a big fad now, both among regulators (that's going to be tempered at least somewhat in the Trump administration) and among actual buyers: the New Jersey forum trifecta is schools, NYC transportation, and downtown area. But there's only so much you can do, even in an area as centralized as this one, and I don't think TOD will take significant pressure off city prices.
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
3,057 posts, read 6,135,657 times
Reputation: 1229
Spring Valley, New York: A wasteland if there ever was one, but is the location of the Pescack Line last stop, and multiple bus lines. A major transit hub, for sure!

Middletown and Newburgh have not-so-good reputations!

Mount Vernon: West is better than the East. But two Metro North Lines do go through the city! But them taxes, and the no longer so great high school.....!

New Rochelle: I prefer New Rochelle over Mount Vernon. PJ's are only, for the most part, on one block. But them taxes.....!

And I'll believe it when I see it when Westchester builds 'affordable housing' across the county!

And speaking of taxes, how much will they be if urban suburbs are the future, as suburban populations grow.....?
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Bronx
14,780 posts, read 17,397,072 times
Reputation: 7508
Quote:
Originally Posted by scatman View Post
Spring Valley, New York: A wasteland if there ever was one, but is the location of the Pescack Line last stop, and multiple bus lines. A major transit hub, for sure!

Middletown and Newburgh have not-so-good reputations!

Mount Vernon: West is better than the East. But two Metro North Lines do go through the city! But them taxes, and the no longer so great high school.....!

New Rochelle: I prefer New Rochelle over Mount Vernon. PJ's are only, for the most part, on one block. But them taxes.....!

And I'll believe it when I see it when Westchester builds 'affordable housing' across the county!

And speaking of taxes, how much will they be if urban suburbs are the future, as suburban populations grow.....?
Suburbs are not cheap. In matter of fact NYC, DC, Boston and San Francisco have some of the most expensive area suburbs in the country. It's just that only recently cities like DC sf and nyc were able to match suburbs in cost and price.
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