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Old 12-30-2016, 07:59 PM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,281,941 times
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
That's the most obvious inequity in the city. The segregation in the school system is another. Who are the majority of students in public schools, and who are the majority of the students in private schools? CUNY (public) is probably majority minority. Not so for Columbia, NYU, and other private universities in the city. Obviously they wanted to reduce crowding for people who live on the UES, so they get phase one of the Second Avenue Subway. Because East Siders have to ride the subway to midtown and downtown (still going to be overcrowded), Cuomo and Penderast are now pushing for ways to reduce costs for phases 2-4.
Think about it though. The city survived and thrived without the SAS for close to a century? The UES isn't exactly exploding in population or development.

Building out infrastructure in the outlying boroughs (where the majority of NY'ers actually live) would bring higher IRR's/NPV's for the city from a strictly financial viewpoint.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:01 PM
 
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A lot of people in outer borough areas with poor subway coverage have cars, though. Much fewer people who will be affected by the SAS do.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by iammax View Post
A lot of people in outer borough areas with poor subway coverage have cars, though. Much fewer people who will be affected by the SAS do.
Nonsensical argument. Many have cars because they have too. Busses have become a disaster. Just as an example. When I was a kid going to school, the B3 from Bergen Beach to Ave U Q-train took around 30 minutes. That same bus not regularly takes close 45 min and in the evening, easily an hour.
Bring subway access and many will leave their cars at home. I guarantee it.

UES's made it seem like they had no access to a subway at all. It's as if the Lexington line was in another state.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:19 PM
 
23,250 posts, read 16,056,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Think about it though. The city survived and thrived without the SAS for close to a century? The UES isn't exactly exploding in population or development.

Building out infrastructure in the outlying boroughs (where the majority of NY'ers actually live) would bring higher IRR's/NPV's for the city from a strictly financial viewpoint.
It inconveniences them to be so overcrowded and that mostly white, well off neighborhood had the political and economic clout to push phase one of the Second Avenue Subway through. And when the MTA contractors were dragging their feet, they had Cuomo crack the whip to finally force them to finish phase one. Now they are seriously push through cost reduction for phases 2-4, for the subway to be truly useful to the UES it needs to go the full length of Manhattan to reduce crowding on the Lex.

LIRR is being built to Grand Central, while Metro North is being built to Penn Station (also benefits mostly well off white suburbanites who cannot be inconvenienced). The only outer borough projects that possibly might happen are de Blasio's BQE connector (connecting well off white East River waterfront properties), a new rail system in Staten Island, and the Rockaway Beach LIRR reactivation (that would help the Rockaways develop and make it more convenient for beach goers to spend money in the city). Areas in the outer boroughs with horrible crowded trains (7 train, Queens Blvd Line) get no new subway proposals as those areas serve poor minorities/immigrants and there's nothing to be gained by the city for proposing trains there, plus they lack economic and political clout.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:21 PM
 
23,250 posts, read 16,056,508 times
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Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Nonsensical argument. Many have cars because they have too. Busses have become a disaster. Just as an example. When I was a kid going to school, the B3 from Bergen Beach to Ave U Q-train took around 30 minutes. That same bus not regularly takes close 45 min and in the evening, easily an hour.
Bring subway access and many will leave their cars at home. I guarantee it.

UES's made it seem like they had no access to a subway at all. It's as if the Lexington line was in another state.
Plus there are buses that go up and down Lex, 3rd, and 2nd Avenues. With that said the Lex was overcrowded and I do think they needed a new subway line, but using that measure the Bronx needs a train to replace the 3rd Avenue El because the 2 and 5 are horribly crowded. Where is this new line? Or a new line to reduce crowding on the 7 train? Or the Queens Blvd line?
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:21 PM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,281,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
It inconveniences them to be so overcrowded and that mostly white, well off neighborhood had the political and economic clout to push phase one of the Second Avenue Subway through. And when the MTA contractors were dragging their feet, they had Cuomo crack the whip to finally force them to finish phase one. Now they are seriously push through cost reduction for phases 2-4, for the subway to be truly useful to the UES it needs to go the full length of Manhattan to reduce crowding on the Lex.

LIRR is being built to Grand Central, while Metro North is being built to Penn Station (also benefits mostly well off white suburbanites who cannot be inconvenienced). The only outer borough projects that possibly might happen are de Blasio's BQE connector (connecting well off white East River waterfront properties), a new rail system in Staten Island, and the Rockaway Beach LIRR reactivation (that would help the Rockaways develop and make it more convenient for beach goers to spend money in the city). Areas in the outer boroughs with horrible crowded trains (7 train, Queens Blvd Line) get no new subway proposals as those areas serve poor minorities/immigrants and there's nothing to be gained by the city for proposing trains there, plus they lack economic and political clout.
Spot on.

There's a lot to be gained in the outer boroughs but the politicians answer to those with $'s. The inefficiencies for the city's economy wrought by lack of subway access in the outer boroughs is huge.

There's a reason traffic congestion is at all time highs in BK and Queens. It takes 30 minutes to drive a mile in many parts of BK and Queens. It's that bad.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:34 PM
 
23,250 posts, read 16,056,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Spot on.

There's a lot to be gained in the outer boroughs but the politicians answer to those with $'s. The inefficiencies for the city's economy wrought by lack of subway access in the outer boroughs is huge.

There's a reason traffic congestion is at all time highs in BK and Queens. It takes 30 minutes to drive a mile in many parts of BK and Queens. It's that bad.
Plus Bloomberg did things to discourage driving in Manhattan (people with $$$ complained). Bike lanes, taking up former lanes in streets to plant trees and flowers, making certain sections of whole streets pedestrian plazas, etc. The city council approved it, but congestion tolls were shot down in the state assembly.

This stuff was not done in the outer boroughs.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:44 PM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,281,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Plus Bloomberg did things to discourage driving in Manhattan (people with $$$ complained). Bike lanes, taking up former lanes in streets to plant trees and flowers, making certain sections of whole streets pedestrian plazas, etc. The city council approved it, but congestion tolls were shot down in the state assembly.

This stuff was not done in the outer boroughs.
To be fair to Bloomberg I think most of the traffic in Manhattan is commercial/pass through.

I don't think that even residents with money in Manhattan drove (their own vehicles) much.
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Old 12-30-2016, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
1,073 posts, read 493,734 times
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Originally Posted by LIS123 View Post

Take the voter ID laws. For those laws to be racist, there would have to be different levels of proof of identity required between blacks and whites in the statute (with the burden of proof higher for blacks than white). That's not the case, but those who oppose voter ID laws still claim they're racist.
This is a simplistic and uninformed reasoning. These laws are about voter suppression and RACE is a central part of it. It would serve you well to research why most Southern states started requiring voter ID for elections. North Carolina for example was sued recently over their voter ID law, please read up on the documents that were released during discovery.
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Old 12-30-2016, 11:35 PM
 
4,582 posts, read 5,810,017 times
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Originally Posted by MaryJayne NYC View Post
Since you are so good with stats, why don't you look up which race is most likely to sexually abuse children? Given the stats, all mothers should be very weary of white men, but of course, this is not the case. People treat white men as individuals and do not label ALL white men as child predators.

White men are no more likely to sexually abuse a child than a black man.

White folks are much more likely to call the cops on their predators. Black folks are much less likely to call the cops. That gives the illusion that white men sexually abuse children at a higher rate, when in fact they don't.

Some studies show that black children are molested at a higher rate. Probably due to the predator having less fear of getting caught by the law.
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