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Old 07-12-2017, 02:36 PM
 
Location: New York
2,581 posts, read 2,675,067 times
Reputation: 736

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
BJ's over there in that neighborhood is one of the busiest in the country. All sorts for income strata shop there.
BJs never worked for me because even when I was married with a kid, I had trouble desiring to buy that much of my food stuffs in bulk. Other than diapers and apple juice, I hardly used it. And then they didn't carry the premium Pamper (at the time), I all but stopped using them and let my membership expire.
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Old 07-12-2017, 03:07 PM
 
Location: New York City
7,129 posts, read 5,504,284 times
Reputation: 4875
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Very disorganized. Often out of items. Typical of a box store in a poorer area. Go to nicer areas of NYC and see the Target stores there. Much better.
Sounds like the Marshalls at the Atlantic Mall in Brooklyn, what a disgusting hell hole. Ghetto people randomly grab stuff and just drop it on the floor and people just kick things on the floor instead of maybe putting it back on the rack
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Old 07-12-2017, 03:12 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,586 posts, read 2,699,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakeJones View Post
Sounds like the Marshalls at the Atlantic Mall in Brooklyn, what a disgusting hell hole. Ghetto people randomly grab stuff and just drop it on the floor and people just kick things on the floor instead of maybe putting it back on the rack
Am thinking along the same lines. Can tell you that this is one thing that stops some of the more high-end places from moving to areas like the South Bronx. More ghetto people, more problems.
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Old 07-12-2017, 03:17 PM
 
753 posts, read 270,213 times
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I think Trader Joe's targets more of a middle-class/professional demographic. Isn't Parkchester more working class/immigrant-oriented? Might not be enough demand there. I think the store's appeal is that it sells natural/organic foods at reasonable prices. It's not really cheap. Perhaps cheaper than other traditional supermarkets, but smaller grocers and ethnic markets fill in the gaps in many working class/immigrant neighborhoods.

It might make more sense in another part of the Bronx (perhaps further north or east?) where the surrounding neighborhoods are more middle-class. Also where there is good parking. There is one Trader Joe's in Queens that seems to be very busy. It's located far away from the subways and geared toward drivers.

And I don't know about Whole Foods in Riverdale. For it to make business sense, it probably needs more than just locals to shop there. What are the surrounding neighborhoods like? Are there enough people from outside Riverdale willing to drive there? Queens doesn't even have a Whole Foods and incomes there are higher overall compared to the Bronx. I think some probably drive out to Long Island. Though many supermarkets also have stepped up their game and broadened their organic selections. There really isn't this huge demand for Whole Foods anymore which is why the chain has been struggling to drive growth in recent years.
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Old 07-12-2017, 03:25 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,586 posts, read 2,699,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MC305 View Post
I think Trader Joe's targets more of a middle-class/professional demographic. Isn't Parkchester more working class/immigrant-oriented? Might not be enough demand there. I think the store's appeal is that it sells natural/organic foods at reasonable prices. It's not really cheap. Perhaps cheaper than other traditional supermarkets, but smaller grocers and ethnic markets fill in the gaps in many working class/immigrant neighborhoods.

It might make more sense in another part of the Bronx (perhaps further north or east?) where the surrounding neighborhoods are more middle-class. Also where there is good parking. There is one Trader Joe's in Queens that seems to be very busy. It's located far away from the subways and geared toward drivers.

And I don't know about Whole Foods in Riverdale. For it to make business sense, it probably needs more than just locals to shop there. What are the surrounding neighborhoods like? Are there enough people from outside Riverdale willing to drive there? Queens doesn't even have a Whole Foods and incomes there are higher overall.
Riverdale's incomes are quite high. It is an upper middle to upper class area without a doubt, and stands quite well with areas of Queens like Neponsit, Douglaston, and Little Neck which have similar median incomes. The private area of Fieldston, one of several estate areas in Riverdale has median incomes over 170k a year, and homes in the millions. Spuyten Duyvil, the southern part of Riverdale has median incomes close to 90k, despite having a sizable elderly population that is retired, and Riverdale itself has a median income over 90k.

Depending on the location, could see shoppers from Inwood coming up to shop there. Those who live west of Broadway could afford it, along with the crowd west of Broadway in Kingsbridge. Could also see people drive down from Westchester. Riverdale is practically in Westchester (10 minutes driving or so) and enough people from Westchester drive down to Riverdale as it is to eat or whatever.
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Old 07-12-2017, 04:32 PM
 
Location: New York
2,581 posts, read 2,675,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Riverdale's incomes are quite high. It is an upper middle to upper class area without a doubt, and stands quite well with areas of Queens like Neponsit, Douglaston, and Little Neck which have similar median incomes. The private area of Fieldston, one of several estate areas in Riverdale has median incomes over 170k a year, and homes in the millions. Spuyten Duyvil, the southern part of Riverdale has median incomes close to 90k, despite having a sizable elderly population that is retired, and Riverdale itself has a median income over 90k.

Depending on the location, could see shoppers from Inwood coming up to shop there. Those who live west of Broadway could afford it, along with the crowd west of Broadway in Kingsbridge. Could also see people drive down from Westchester. Riverdale is practically in Westchester (10 minutes driving or so) and enough people from Westchester drive down to Riverdale as it is to eat or whatever.


With all due respect, I am buying an apartment in Parkchester. In order to pay both the mortgage and maintenance, I have to make above the median income, which I do. I'm not considered low-income by any stretch of the imagination. My needs are slightly higher in that I am divorced so I need two bedrooms, one for me, one for my kid. Poor people would not be able to finance my purchase.

So whatever was, is no longer. I also see that the prices for apartments similar to mine have gone up by 40% in the past three years. If only I had the foresight to by sooner. I suspect some of you older Bronx residents paid significantly less for your dwelling in a more Tony area than I am paying now.

My point is I think you misread the demographic. My building is filled with teachers, contractors and many solid union people. Well not the cream of the elite, they certainly have money to spend. And that will continue as housing costs continue to soar. To sum up, if you were poor or even low income, you could not afford Parkchester.
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Old 07-12-2017, 04:45 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,586 posts, read 2,699,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roseba View Post
With all due respect, I am buying an apartment in Parkchester. In order to pay both the mortgage and maintenance, I have to make above the median income, which I do. I'm not considered low-income by any stretch of the imagination. My needs are slightly higher in that I am divorced so I need two bedrooms, one for me, one for my kid. Poor people would not be able to finance my purchase.

So whatever was, is no longer. I also see that the prices for apartments similar to mine have gone up by 40% in the past three years. If only I had the foresight to by sooner. I suspect some of you older Bronx residents paid significantly less for your dwelling in a more Tony area than I am paying now.

My point is I think you misread the demographic. My building is filled with teachers, contractors and many solid union people. Well not the cream of the elite, they certainly have money to spend. And that will continue as housing costs continue to soar. To sum up, if you were poor or even low income, you could not afford Parkchester.
Have never said Parkchester was poor. Am aware of it being a working class to middle class area. Am thinking you're quoting the wrong person.

Can tell you that where I live, a single individual needs to earn around 80k for loft apartments, and am certain I'll be paying more than you when I purchase in the next few years. If going for a true one bedroom or whatever, 100k is not out of the question. Am thinking Parkchester isn't there yet with such prices, and certainly not the South Bronx. The difference with Parkchester and where I live is for say $1800, can get a two bedroom or whatever (*BELOW* $1800 in most cases), where as $1800-2000 is the standard for a studio or a one bedroom and then some. Have seen studios at $1900. Land ain't cheap in my area that's for sure!

Last edited by pierrepont7731; 07-12-2017 at 05:00 PM..
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Old 07-12-2017, 05:56 PM
 
165 posts, read 74,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Am here to say that Aldi's is just like Trader Joe's. "Healthy" food without the mark-up. It's very no frills though. Only their brand with limited variety and the country of origin may be suspect. I want to know where my food is sourced/coming from, and I prefer local, organic food. Like Trader Joe's, Aldi's is very secretive about where some of their food comes from (something *A LOT* of people like to overlook because the prices are so low), which means you don't know what sort of quality you're getting despite their claims of offering high quality. Now on some items they will list the country of origin, and some items are from the U.S. and organic (am thinking about this organic cereal that is amazing that my girlfriend buys from Trader Joe's), but there are plenty of things that they don't label at all.

The GF shops at Trader Joe's sometimes on the Upper West Side when she wants a break from WF or Fairway since she lives in Manhattan and I must admit things taste good overall, but I still won't endorse them because of their secrecy. Some things I find suspect and refuse to eat that are in her fridge, so I either do without or buy them up at WF or whatever.
Aldi's and Trader Joe's are the same owners.....
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Old 07-12-2017, 05:59 PM
 
165 posts, read 74,478 times
Reputation: 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Am in agreement. Have always wondered how that Target is doing over by the MNRR station in the South Bronx. Target shoppers tend to be more well heeled. Can admit to shopping in Target myself for Method soap and other organic household items that are cheaper than WF, like Tom's toothpaste or whatever. However, have heard that the Target in the South Bronx is a *** show for lack of a better word. Has to be another thing considered... How have places like Starbucks and Chiptole fared thus far in the South Bronx? If the answer is well, then perhaps other establishments could be considered.
All of Target's Bronx locations are doing very well.... Just ask them.
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Old 07-12-2017, 05:59 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,565,327 times
Reputation: 5949
Damn, this thread turned so boring
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