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Old 07-16-2017, 12:08 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,594 posts, read 2,718,211 times
Reputation: 2825

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Dude. I just presented to you an article that the NYT ran that presents multiple examples of what you deem illegal. Furthermore, it was presented in a positive light.

The city doesn't seem to give a ****. Meaning it's either not illegal or the law in this case is worth ****. Either way, it doesn't matter. This is the norm in NYC and it's a major reason why rents are they way they are.

One bedrooms are now catering to 3 or 4 income households. When you look at it that way, rents don't seem outrageous at all. Rents seem in line with what the market will bear.
Am in disagreement. Clearly stated what was done was legal. Said that others likely don't follow the rules as to how to legally split rooms up or whatever.
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Old 07-16-2017, 12:13 AM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,292,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Am in disagreement. Clearly stated what was done was legal. Said that others likely don't follow the rules as to how to legally split rooms up or whatever.
All the examples were legal?

Quote:
Dave Delaney, 34, knew the compromises required by a jerry-built bedroom all too well. In his early 20s, he lived for five years with three buddies in a two-bedroom apartment on East 57th Street and Third Avenue. The group divided the living room into three bedrooms, two of which faced the windows while a third (his bedroom) faced the apartment’s interior. One of the real bedrooms was used as a living room; the other was taken by the fourth roommate, who paid extra for it.

“It was brutal,” Mr. Delaney said. “You could literally hear a pin drop in another room. It turned into us all having to go to bed at the same time. It was basically like we were living in the same room but we couldn’t see each other.”

Because he had no window and no ventilation, it got so hot in Mr. Delaney’s room that he had to keep his door wide open at night. When it became unbearable, he bought a portable air-conditioner and carved a hole in his wall for the exhaust hose. The common areas would heat up, but Mr. Delaney’s room was perfectly chilled.
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/09/r...l?mcubz=2&_r=0
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Old 07-16-2017, 12:18 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,594 posts, read 2,718,211 times
Reputation: 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
Or course they are. What about all of the ones that don't make the Times?
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Old 07-16-2017, 12:24 AM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,292,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
Or course they are. What about all of the ones that don't make the Times?
I agree. Can you forward me all the instances you can find of NYC DOB enforcing the laws?

I'm telling you that the city doesn't care in most instances. Especially when the landlord is politically connected or large enough.

The City knows there's a housing shortage on NYC so it is not in their interest to enforce the law in this case.
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Old 07-16-2017, 12:32 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
7,594 posts, read 2,718,211 times
Reputation: 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by wawaweewa View Post
I agree. Can you forward me all the instances you can find of NYC DOB enforcing the laws?

I'm telling you that the city doesn't care in most instances. Especially when the landlord is politically connected or large enough.

The City knows there's a housing shortage on NYC so it is not in their interest to enforce the law in this case.
Am thinking it's a Catch 22. Don't enforce it and you'll have landlords jacking up the rents even more. Enforce it and more people likely will be homeless. To the OP, just stay home if you can't find a decent paying job to afford the rent. Living like a squatter isn't worth it.
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Old 07-16-2017, 07:00 AM
 
755 posts, read 271,972 times
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The 40x rule is not everywhere. I've seen a fair amount of listings in the outer boroughs that will say lower numbers like 30x rent or just "good income, good credit". In any event, without a steady job, most landlords are probably not going to take you. Look at subletting rooms instead. I've actually seen flyers on lampposts and ads on bulletin boards in ethnic markets that advertise rooms for as low as the $600-700 range. Though these are often written in other languages so they may only be looking for people of the same ethnicity/nationality. If you ask your friends, I'm sure you can find websites where people list rooms. Craigslist is one but I know there are others.

Temporary walls are definitely common. And legal in many cases. I used to live in a converted 3-bedroom in Manhattan. It was originally a 2-bedroom but part of the living room was sectioned off with a temporary wall. The converted bedroom was a decent size and had windows. And we still had a decent-sized common area to fit a couch and a TV (although not enough space for a dining table). However, throughout the city, there were some walls that were not legal and management companies had been cracking down according to this NY Times article from a few years ago. The Fall of Temporary Apartment Walls - The New York Times

Quote:
As the city aggressively enforces a long existent but widely ignored code, walls are falling across Manhattan, radically altering the housing landscape for scores of young professionals. Thousands of renters are being told that the walls that have been put up over the years without approval from the Department of Buildings must come down. And new renters are being informed that if they wish to divide a space, they will need to rely on bookshelves or partial walls that don’t reach the ceiling.

“The impact has already been dramatic,” said Gordon Golub, the senior managing director for rentals at Citi Habitats. “Landlords are all trying to come to some sort of conclusion as to what they are going to do in allowing any walls or a different sort of wall that might go up, and it is affecting brokers and customers.”

Manhattan apartments are as varied as the roommates who decide to share a place. Because of this, there are no rules that apply universally. But in all cases, temporary walls must not block exit routes or interfere with the ventilation and sprinkler systems. And there are minimum requirements for room size.
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Old 07-16-2017, 07:41 AM
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11,386 posts, read 9,883,222 times
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Sounds like the OP is going to be in for quite the shock.
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:37 AM
 
3,333 posts, read 3,292,689 times
Reputation: 2834
Quote:
Originally Posted by MC305 View Post
The 40x rule is not everywhere. I've seen a fair amount of listings in the outer boroughs that will say lower numbers like 30x rent or just "good income, good credit". In any event, without a steady job, most landlords are probably not going to take you. Look at subletting rooms instead. I've actually seen flyers on lampposts and ads on bulletin boards in ethnic markets that advertise rooms for as low as the $600-700 range. Though these are often written in other languages so they may only be looking for people of the same ethnicity/nationality. If you ask your friends, I'm sure you can find websites where people list rooms. Craigslist is one but I know there are others.

Temporary walls are definitely common. And legal in many cases. I used to live in a converted 3-bedroom in Manhattan. It was originally a 2-bedroom but part of the living room was sectioned off with a temporary wall. The converted bedroom was a decent size and had windows. And we still had a decent-sized common area to fit a couch and a TV (although not enough space for a dining table). However, throughout the city, there were some walls that were not legal and management companies had been cracking down according to this NY Times article from a few years ago. The Fall of Temporary Apartment Walls - The New York Times
Article is from 2010, shortly after the financial crisis. With demand depressed, landlords had an incentive to break up multi roommate apartments and try to create more demand.

The article celebrating the "creativity" of multiple roommates in 1 and 2 bedroom apartments is from 2016. There's plenty of demand now and far too little supply. There's an incentive for landlords to encourage multiple roommates and drive up rents.
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:53 AM
 
10,644 posts, read 20,793,559 times
Reputation: 8186
Quote:
Originally Posted by MC305 View Post
The 40x rule is not everywhere. I've seen a fair amount of listings in the outer boroughs that will say lower numbers like 30x rent or just "good income, good credit". In any event, without a steady job, most landlords are probably not going to take you. Look at subletting rooms instead. I've actually seen flyers on lampposts and ads on bulletin boards in ethnic markets that advertise rooms for as low as the $600-700 range. Though these are often written in other languages so they may only be looking for people of the same ethnicity/nationality. If you ask your friends, I'm sure you can find websites where people list rooms. Craigslist is one but I know there are others.

Temporary walls are definitely common. And legal in many cases. I used to live in a converted 3-bedroom in Manhattan. It was originally a 2-bedroom but part of the living room was sectioned off with a temporary wall. The converted bedroom was a decent size and had windows. And we still had a decent-sized common area to fit a couch and a TV (although not enough space for a dining table). However, throughout the city, there were some walls that were not legal and management companies had been cracking down according to this NY Times article from a few years ago. The Fall of Temporary Apartment Walls - The New York Times
Sorry this is off topic, but could you tell me how you are copying and pasting from the NY Times? I am using a laptop, not ipad. The new NY Times site doesn't seem to allow me to copy and paste text. Thanks!
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Old 07-16-2017, 09:08 AM
 
3,510 posts, read 1,811,429 times
Reputation: 1639
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
In such a case, boyfriend was not on the lease. Am wondering how you could say landlord wouldn't have cared as if you can just have anyone move in that isn't on the lease.
Exactly, my boyfriend/husband wasn't on the lease. I don't see why the landlord would have cared.
In addition, everyone knew my boyfriend was living there. Including the super, who knew us and came to fix a things on occasion.
In fact, after we got married, I likely mentioned "my husband" to the landlord a few times. But he never cared that my husband "wasn't on the lease."
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